Dec 04, 2020
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Dixie Chicks documentary gets warm welcome at Toronto film fest

TORONTO (CP)_Tell these feisty chicks to "shut up and sing" and they’ll make a movie. The Dixie Chicks have rebounded from death threats, stinging political attacks and radio station battles with "Shut Up and Sing," a moving documentary that debuted this week at the Toronto International Film Festival.

It was three years ago that front woman Natalie Maines told a London audience that the Texas band was embarrassed U.S. President George W. Bush was from their home state. Since then, the trio has weathered a firestorm of controversy to create a new album, discover new fans, have a couple of babies and embark on a new tour. But Maines said Wednesday she has not changed her tune about the president.

"Everything that has happened since then is more of a disgrace and watching all the footage from Hurricane Katrina is unbelievable," Haines told a packed news conference as cameras snapped shots of her and bandmates Martie Maguire and Emily Robison.

"He has been a disaster."

In fact, the touching film not only repeats her controversial statement but adds fuel to the fire with yet another expletive-laden slam that Haines admits made her pause once she realized it had been caught on camera.

"I was being myself and that’s what a documentary is about," Haines said of the scene.

"When I first saw that I kind of went, ‘Uhnhh!,"’ she said, as if gasping for air. "But I don’t think at this stage I’m pissing off any new people."

The diminutive blond drew no ire from enthusiastic audiences that screened the film during the festival. An early press screening Monday drew spontaneous applause and laughter, while a ritzy gala screening ended with a standing ovation. The film, directed by Oscar-winner Barbara Kopple with Cecilia Peck, daughter of late film legend Gregory Peck, drew its most ardent approval in one scene where the band’s handlers propose dropping U.S. cities from a poor-selling tour and adding Canadian ones instead. "Kamloops, Moose Jaw…. Any town with a hockey arena," one suggests in the film as hoots of approval emerge from the audience.

Haines said Wednesday the band has a new appreciation for Canadian fans, who stood by the country trio while others in the United States tossed CDs in the trash at the behest of a right-wing campaign.

"Yes, thank God for Canada," said Haines, noting the band found political support from countries around the world. "It’s a little surprising that the U.S. hasn’t necessarily caught on yet."

"It was encouraging to have the premiere of this film in a country where what happened to the Dixie Chicks could never happen here," added Peck, repeating comments made at the gala screening earlier in the week.

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Front Page, Industry News

Dixie Chicks documentary gets warm welcome at Toronto film fest

TORONTO (CP)_Tell these feisty chicks to "shut up and sing" and they’ll make a movie. The Dixie Chicks have rebounded from death threats, stinging political attacks and radio station battles with "Shut Up and Sing," a moving documentary that debuted this week at the Toronto International Film Festival.

It was three years ago that front woman Natalie Maines told a London audience that the Texas band was embarrassed U.S. President George W. Bush was from their home state. Since then, the trio has weathered a firestorm of controversy to create a new album, discover new fans, have a couple of babies and embark on a new tour. But Maines said Wednesday she has not changed her tune about the president.

"Everything that has happened since then is more of a disgrace and watching all the footage from Hurricane Katrina is unbelievable," Haines told a packed news conference as cameras snapped shots of her and bandmates Martie Maguire and Emily Robison.

"He has been a disaster."

In fact, the touching film not only repeats her controversial statement but adds fuel to the fire with yet another expletive-laden slam that Haines admits made her pause once she realized it had been caught on camera.

"I was being myself and that’s what a documentary is about," Haines said of the scene.

"When I first saw that I kind of went, ‘Uhnhh!,"’ she said, as if gasping for air. "But I don’t think at this stage I’m pissing off any new people."

The diminutive blond drew no ire from enthusiastic audiences that screened the film during the festival. An early press screening Monday drew spontaneous applause and laughter, while a ritzy gala screening ended with a standing ovation. The film, directed by Oscar-winner Barbara Kopple with Cecilia Peck, daughter of late film legend Gregory Peck, drew its most ardent approval in one scene where the band’s handlers propose dropping U.S. cities from a poor-selling tour and adding Canadian ones instead. "Kamloops, Moose Jaw…. Any town with a hockey arena," one suggests in the film as hoots of approval emerge from the audience.

Haines said Wednesday the band has a new appreciation for Canadian fans, who stood by the country trio while others in the United States tossed CDs in the trash at the behest of a right-wing campaign.

"Yes, thank God for Canada," said Haines, noting the band found political support from countries around the world. "It’s a little surprising that the U.S. hasn’t necessarily caught on yet."

"It was encouraging to have the premiere of this film in a country where what happened to the Dixie Chicks could never happen here," added Peck, repeating comments made at the gala screening earlier in the week.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Dixie Chicks documentary gets warm welcome at Toronto film fest

TORONTO (CP)_Tell these feisty chicks to "shut up and sing" and they’ll make a movie. The Dixie Chicks have rebounded from death threats, stinging political attacks and radio station battles with "Shut Up and Sing," a moving documentary that debuted this week at the Toronto International Film Festival.

It was three years ago that front woman Natalie Maines told a London audience that the Texas band was embarrassed U.S. President George W. Bush was from their home state. Since then, the trio has weathered a firestorm of controversy to create a new album, discover new fans, have a couple of babies and embark on a new tour. But Maines said Wednesday she has not changed her tune about the president.

"Everything that has happened since then is more of a disgrace and watching all the footage from Hurricane Katrina is unbelievable," Haines told a packed news conference as cameras snapped shots of her and bandmates Martie Maguire and Emily Robison.

"He has been a disaster."

In fact, the touching film not only repeats her controversial statement but adds fuel to the fire with yet another expletive-laden slam that Haines admits made her pause once she realized it had been caught on camera.

"I was being myself and that’s what a documentary is about," Haines said of the scene.

"When I first saw that I kind of went, ‘Uhnhh!,"’ she said, as if gasping for air. "But I don’t think at this stage I’m pissing off any new people."

The diminutive blond drew no ire from enthusiastic audiences that screened the film during the festival. An early press screening Monday drew spontaneous applause and laughter, while a ritzy gala screening ended with a standing ovation. The film, directed by Oscar-winner Barbara Kopple with Cecilia Peck, daughter of late film legend Gregory Peck, drew its most ardent approval in one scene where the band’s handlers propose dropping U.S. cities from a poor-selling tour and adding Canadian ones instead. "Kamloops, Moose Jaw…. Any town with a hockey arena," one suggests in the film as hoots of approval emerge from the audience.

Haines said Wednesday the band has a new appreciation for Canadian fans, who stood by the country trio while others in the United States tossed CDs in the trash at the behest of a right-wing campaign.

"Yes, thank God for Canada," said Haines, noting the band found political support from countries around the world. "It’s a little surprising that the U.S. hasn’t necessarily caught on yet."

"It was encouraging to have the premiere of this film in a country where what happened to the Dixie Chicks could never happen here," added Peck, repeating comments made at the gala screening earlier in the week.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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