Jun 25, 2019
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CBC/Radio-Canada shares its views

OTTAWA, Sept. 28 /CNW Telbec/ – CBC/Radio-Canada yesterday filed its submission with the CRTC for its Television Policy Review, which is a crucial part of setting out Canada’s broadcast policy for the 21st century.

"CBC/Radio-Canada must be able to adapt to the realities of the fast-changing broadcasting environment," said Robert Rabinovitch, President and CEO of CBC/Radio-Canada. "We welcome this opportunity to weigh in with our perspective and, in so doing, take part in the dialogue that will give shape to the policy and regulatory framework within which all broadcasters will evolve, thereby ensuring the Canadian broadcasting system remains as robust as it is resilient."

CBC/Radio-Canada believes that Canadians will be well-served if their broadcast system is equipped to respond to the opportunities and challenges posed by new communications technologies and shifting consumer habits.

The issues that the CRTC is dealing with in this review cut to the core of the matter. The Commission has asked conventional broadcasters about the future of over-the-air reception in a digital environment. Very few Canadians continue to rely on over-the-air signals for their television viewing. As a result, CBC/Radio-Canada has recommended a hybrid cable, satellite and over-the-air model for the CRTC’s consideration that recognizes this new reception reality.

Conventional broadcasters – both public and private – are the main contributors to the Canadian broadcasting system. Unfortunately, all these broadcasters rely heavily on advertising revenues to support Canadian

television programming, and this revenue source is now weakening and faces an uncertain future. Therefore, CBC/Radio-Canada is proposing that the CRTC establish conventional broadcaster eligibility for subscription revenues.

"The strength of the system depends on a healthy public broadcaster that is able to connect Canadians through compelling Canadian content," added Rabinovitch. "Some of the issues that will be discussed – over-the-air

distribution and subscription revenues in particular – are fundamental to conventional broadcasters’ ability to contend with the changing needs of Canadians. We look forward to the hearings in November."

CBC/Radio-Canada’s submission is available at

www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/submissions. Fact sheets on over-the-air transmission and subscription revenues are also available at the same address.

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Headline, Industry News

CBC/Radio-Canada shares its views

OTTAWA, Sept. 28 /CNW Telbec/ – CBC/Radio-Canada yesterday filed its submission with the CRTC for its Television Policy Review, which is a crucial part of setting out Canada’s broadcast policy for the 21st century.

"CBC/Radio-Canada must be able to adapt to the realities of the fast-changing broadcasting environment," said Robert Rabinovitch, President and CEO of CBC/Radio-Canada. "We welcome this opportunity to weigh in with our perspective and, in so doing, take part in the dialogue that will give shape to the policy and regulatory framework within which all broadcasters will evolve, thereby ensuring the Canadian broadcasting system remains as robust as it is resilient."

CBC/Radio-Canada believes that Canadians will be well-served if their broadcast system is equipped to respond to the opportunities and challenges posed by new communications technologies and shifting consumer habits.

The issues that the CRTC is dealing with in this review cut to the core of the matter. The Commission has asked conventional broadcasters about the future of over-the-air reception in a digital environment. Very few Canadians continue to rely on over-the-air signals for their television viewing. As a result, CBC/Radio-Canada has recommended a hybrid cable, satellite and over-the-air model for the CRTC’s consideration that recognizes this new reception reality.

Conventional broadcasters – both public and private – are the main contributors to the Canadian broadcasting system. Unfortunately, all these broadcasters rely heavily on advertising revenues to support Canadian

television programming, and this revenue source is now weakening and faces an uncertain future. Therefore, CBC/Radio-Canada is proposing that the CRTC establish conventional broadcaster eligibility for subscription revenues.

"The strength of the system depends on a healthy public broadcaster that is able to connect Canadians through compelling Canadian content," added Rabinovitch. "Some of the issues that will be discussed – over-the-air

distribution and subscription revenues in particular – are fundamental to conventional broadcasters’ ability to contend with the changing needs of Canadians. We look forward to the hearings in November."

CBC/Radio-Canada’s submission is available at

www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/submissions. Fact sheets on over-the-air transmission and subscription revenues are also available at the same address.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Headline, Industry News

CBC/Radio-Canada shares its views

OTTAWA, Sept. 28 /CNW Telbec/ – CBC/Radio-Canada yesterday filed its submission with the CRTC for its Television Policy Review, which is a crucial part of setting out Canada’s broadcast policy for the 21st century.

"CBC/Radio-Canada must be able to adapt to the realities of the fast-changing broadcasting environment," said Robert Rabinovitch, President and CEO of CBC/Radio-Canada. "We welcome this opportunity to weigh in with our perspective and, in so doing, take part in the dialogue that will give shape to the policy and regulatory framework within which all broadcasters will evolve, thereby ensuring the Canadian broadcasting system remains as robust as it is resilient."

CBC/Radio-Canada believes that Canadians will be well-served if their broadcast system is equipped to respond to the opportunities and challenges posed by new communications technologies and shifting consumer habits.

The issues that the CRTC is dealing with in this review cut to the core of the matter. The Commission has asked conventional broadcasters about the future of over-the-air reception in a digital environment. Very few Canadians continue to rely on over-the-air signals for their television viewing. As a result, CBC/Radio-Canada has recommended a hybrid cable, satellite and over-the-air model for the CRTC’s consideration that recognizes this new reception reality.

Conventional broadcasters – both public and private – are the main contributors to the Canadian broadcasting system. Unfortunately, all these broadcasters rely heavily on advertising revenues to support Canadian

television programming, and this revenue source is now weakening and faces an uncertain future. Therefore, CBC/Radio-Canada is proposing that the CRTC establish conventional broadcaster eligibility for subscription revenues.

"The strength of the system depends on a healthy public broadcaster that is able to connect Canadians through compelling Canadian content," added Rabinovitch. "Some of the issues that will be discussed – over-the-air

distribution and subscription revenues in particular – are fundamental to conventional broadcasters’ ability to contend with the changing needs of Canadians. We look forward to the hearings in November."

CBC/Radio-Canada’s submission is available at

www.cbc.radio-canada.ca/submissions. Fact sheets on over-the-air transmission and subscription revenues are also available at the same address.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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