Nov 24, 2020
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Canadian TV drama crisis

Toronto – ACTRA welcomes the chance to address the crisis in Canadian television drama with the CRTC’s review of its regulatory framework for over-the-air television. ACTRA’s submission calls for regulations to guarantee a minimum level of Canadian drama on our public airwaves.

"Though late in coming, it is at this time possible for the CRTC to stop the freefall of Canadian drama on television," said Richard Hardacre, ACTRA’s National President. "We have continually called for a review and a regulatory shift since 2000. We call on the CRTC to require that private broadcasters invest in Canadian drama, Canadian jobs and Canadian culture."

This fall’s CRTC review is one of the most important investigations into Canadian TV drama since the 1999 Television Policy came into force. That policy eliminated expenditure requirements for Canadian private broadcasters and expanded the definition of priority programming to include cheaper fare, such as variety shows and entertainment magazine programs. Since the changes, Canadian private broadcaster’s spending on American programming has risen from 27% of revenue to an all-time high of 35%, while spending on Canadian drama has dropped to 3.2% of ad revenue, the lowest percentage in eight years, according to CRTC’s own reports.

"We are not alone in our view that Canadian drama is critically important to the future of Canadian television. Drama is the most popular genre of TV programming and Canadian dramatic programming is central to our cultural sovereignty," added Hardacre.

ACTRA is making a written submission to the CRTC, as well as contributing to the Coalition of Canadian Audio-visual Union’s (CCAU)submission. These submissions identify key policy objectives to solve the crisis in English-Canadian television drama. In addition, ACTRA has asked to make an appearance at the CRTC’s public hearings.

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Headline, Industry News

Canadian TV drama crisis

Toronto – ACTRA welcomes the chance to address the crisis in Canadian television drama with the CRTC’s review of its regulatory framework for over-the-air television. ACTRA’s submission calls for regulations to guarantee a minimum level of Canadian drama on our public airwaves.

"Though late in coming, it is at this time possible for the CRTC to stop the freefall of Canadian drama on television," said Richard Hardacre, ACTRA’s National President. "We have continually called for a review and a regulatory shift since 2000. We call on the CRTC to require that private broadcasters invest in Canadian drama, Canadian jobs and Canadian culture."

This fall’s CRTC review is one of the most important investigations into Canadian TV drama since the 1999 Television Policy came into force. That policy eliminated expenditure requirements for Canadian private broadcasters and expanded the definition of priority programming to include cheaper fare, such as variety shows and entertainment magazine programs. Since the changes, Canadian private broadcaster’s spending on American programming has risen from 27% of revenue to an all-time high of 35%, while spending on Canadian drama has dropped to 3.2% of ad revenue, the lowest percentage in eight years, according to CRTC’s own reports.

"We are not alone in our view that Canadian drama is critically important to the future of Canadian television. Drama is the most popular genre of TV programming and Canadian dramatic programming is central to our cultural sovereignty," added Hardacre.

ACTRA is making a written submission to the CRTC, as well as contributing to the Coalition of Canadian Audio-visual Union’s (CCAU)submission. These submissions identify key policy objectives to solve the crisis in English-Canadian television drama. In addition, ACTRA has asked to make an appearance at the CRTC’s public hearings.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

Canadian TV drama crisis

Toronto – ACTRA welcomes the chance to address the crisis in Canadian television drama with the CRTC’s review of its regulatory framework for over-the-air television. ACTRA’s submission calls for regulations to guarantee a minimum level of Canadian drama on our public airwaves.

"Though late in coming, it is at this time possible for the CRTC to stop the freefall of Canadian drama on television," said Richard Hardacre, ACTRA’s National President. "We have continually called for a review and a regulatory shift since 2000. We call on the CRTC to require that private broadcasters invest in Canadian drama, Canadian jobs and Canadian culture."

This fall’s CRTC review is one of the most important investigations into Canadian TV drama since the 1999 Television Policy came into force. That policy eliminated expenditure requirements for Canadian private broadcasters and expanded the definition of priority programming to include cheaper fare, such as variety shows and entertainment magazine programs. Since the changes, Canadian private broadcaster’s spending on American programming has risen from 27% of revenue to an all-time high of 35%, while spending on Canadian drama has dropped to 3.2% of ad revenue, the lowest percentage in eight years, according to CRTC’s own reports.

"We are not alone in our view that Canadian drama is critically important to the future of Canadian television. Drama is the most popular genre of TV programming and Canadian dramatic programming is central to our cultural sovereignty," added Hardacre.

ACTRA is making a written submission to the CRTC, as well as contributing to the Coalition of Canadian Audio-visual Union’s (CCAU)submission. These submissions identify key policy objectives to solve the crisis in English-Canadian television drama. In addition, ACTRA has asked to make an appearance at the CRTC’s public hearings.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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