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Changes to Feature Film Fund

Montreal, October 23, 2006—Telefilm Canada today released key changes to the Canada Feature Film Fund (CFFF) for the English-language market, following consultations with the CFFF Working Group for the English market. Changes are to go into effect for 2007-2008. The English Working Group—composed of 18 Telefilm and industry representatives in production, distribution, exhibition and broadcasting, and from unions, guilds and government—has been working intensively since May of this year to bring the Fund more in step with market realities. Telefilm is also working with a French Working Group on creating counterpart solutions.

“We count on the industry, through the Canada Feature Film Fund Working Groups, to find the best way for our programs to be relevant and in line with the industry’s needs,” said Wayne Clarkson, Telefilm Canada’s Executive Director.

“By collaborating with the two Working Groups, we are ensuring that the CFFF is more efficient and effective, responds to the specific needs of the English- and French-language markets and continues to support a diversity of films.

“On the English side, the industry’s new synergy is starting to pay off; we are definitely on a kind of cinematic roll with the recent success of Water, Bon Cop, Bad Cop and Trailer Park Boys: The Movie. And the best part is we still have a lot of good movies to come this year.”

Changes to the English CFFF guidelines for 2007-2008 The latest changes for the English market follow on the heels of other initiatives this year to build success for English-language cinema. Of note, Telefilm eliminated national deadlines for English-language projects. The elimination of deadlines better allowed the industry to work with Telefilm in developing their projects, and allowed the Corporation to better recognize the specific challenges of deal-making in this language market.

In addition, Telefilm worked with the industry through the Feature Film Focus Group and Creative Immersion this year to help foster a more collaborative environment for success in the English-language market.

1. Production performance envelopes will be awarded to the top 15% of films earning a minimum of $500,000 in box office

The new threshold, which is more in step with market realities for English Canadian cinema, will encourage new players to access the envelope system.

2. Introduction of performance development envelopes of up to $150,000

Companies achieving success at the box office, but not earning a sufficient envelope for ensuing production (less than $750,000), will receive the benefits of an envelope for use in the development of subsequent projects. This change both maximizes the efficiency of the production performance envelopes—by ensuring that production performance envelopes are large enough to significantly contribute to production financing—and provides greater autonomy for producers not reaching this bar to develop new projects.

3. Eligible feature-length documentaries now qualify for production performance envelopes of up to $1 million

This move recognizes the performance of Canadian feature-length documentaries that achieve success at the domestic box office. This is in line with the recommendation by the Standing Committee that a revised feature film policy recognize long-form documentaries.

4. Greater autonomy for distributors to commit resources based on market realities

Telefilm will award distribution envelopes to all qualifying companies by eliminating the previous minimum cut-off of $500,000 for marketing activities.

Developing and promoting the Canadian audiovisual industry Telefilm Canada is a federal cultural agency dedicated to the development and promotion of the Canadian audiovisual industry. Telefilm provides financial support to the private sector to create distinctively Canadian productions that appeal to domestic and international audiences. The Corporation also administers the funding programs of the Canadian Television Fund.

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Headline, Industry News

Changes to Feature Film Fund

Montreal, October 23, 2006—Telefilm Canada today released key changes to the Canada Feature Film Fund (CFFF) for the English-language market, following consultations with the CFFF Working Group for the English market. Changes are to go into effect for 2007-2008. The English Working Group—composed of 18 Telefilm and industry representatives in production, distribution, exhibition and broadcasting, and from unions, guilds and government—has been working intensively since May of this year to bring the Fund more in step with market realities. Telefilm is also working with a French Working Group on creating counterpart solutions.

“We count on the industry, through the Canada Feature Film Fund Working Groups, to find the best way for our programs to be relevant and in line with the industry’s needs,” said Wayne Clarkson, Telefilm Canada’s Executive Director.

“By collaborating with the two Working Groups, we are ensuring that the CFFF is more efficient and effective, responds to the specific needs of the English- and French-language markets and continues to support a diversity of films.

“On the English side, the industry’s new synergy is starting to pay off; we are definitely on a kind of cinematic roll with the recent success of Water, Bon Cop, Bad Cop and Trailer Park Boys: The Movie. And the best part is we still have a lot of good movies to come this year.”

Changes to the English CFFF guidelines for 2007-2008 The latest changes for the English market follow on the heels of other initiatives this year to build success for English-language cinema. Of note, Telefilm eliminated national deadlines for English-language projects. The elimination of deadlines better allowed the industry to work with Telefilm in developing their projects, and allowed the Corporation to better recognize the specific challenges of deal-making in this language market.

In addition, Telefilm worked with the industry through the Feature Film Focus Group and Creative Immersion this year to help foster a more collaborative environment for success in the English-language market.

1. Production performance envelopes will be awarded to the top 15% of films earning a minimum of $500,000 in box office

The new threshold, which is more in step with market realities for English Canadian cinema, will encourage new players to access the envelope system.

2. Introduction of performance development envelopes of up to $150,000

Companies achieving success at the box office, but not earning a sufficient envelope for ensuing production (less than $750,000), will receive the benefits of an envelope for use in the development of subsequent projects. This change both maximizes the efficiency of the production performance envelopes—by ensuring that production performance envelopes are large enough to significantly contribute to production financing—and provides greater autonomy for producers not reaching this bar to develop new projects.

3. Eligible feature-length documentaries now qualify for production performance envelopes of up to $1 million

This move recognizes the performance of Canadian feature-length documentaries that achieve success at the domestic box office. This is in line with the recommendation by the Standing Committee that a revised feature film policy recognize long-form documentaries.

4. Greater autonomy for distributors to commit resources based on market realities

Telefilm will award distribution envelopes to all qualifying companies by eliminating the previous minimum cut-off of $500,000 for marketing activities.

Developing and promoting the Canadian audiovisual industry Telefilm Canada is a federal cultural agency dedicated to the development and promotion of the Canadian audiovisual industry. Telefilm provides financial support to the private sector to create distinctively Canadian productions that appeal to domestic and international audiences. The Corporation also administers the funding programs of the Canadian Television Fund.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

Changes to Feature Film Fund

Montreal, October 23, 2006—Telefilm Canada today released key changes to the Canada Feature Film Fund (CFFF) for the English-language market, following consultations with the CFFF Working Group for the English market. Changes are to go into effect for 2007-2008. The English Working Group—composed of 18 Telefilm and industry representatives in production, distribution, exhibition and broadcasting, and from unions, guilds and government—has been working intensively since May of this year to bring the Fund more in step with market realities. Telefilm is also working with a French Working Group on creating counterpart solutions.

“We count on the industry, through the Canada Feature Film Fund Working Groups, to find the best way for our programs to be relevant and in line with the industry’s needs,” said Wayne Clarkson, Telefilm Canada’s Executive Director.

“By collaborating with the two Working Groups, we are ensuring that the CFFF is more efficient and effective, responds to the specific needs of the English- and French-language markets and continues to support a diversity of films.

“On the English side, the industry’s new synergy is starting to pay off; we are definitely on a kind of cinematic roll with the recent success of Water, Bon Cop, Bad Cop and Trailer Park Boys: The Movie. And the best part is we still have a lot of good movies to come this year.”

Changes to the English CFFF guidelines for 2007-2008 The latest changes for the English market follow on the heels of other initiatives this year to build success for English-language cinema. Of note, Telefilm eliminated national deadlines for English-language projects. The elimination of deadlines better allowed the industry to work with Telefilm in developing their projects, and allowed the Corporation to better recognize the specific challenges of deal-making in this language market.

In addition, Telefilm worked with the industry through the Feature Film Focus Group and Creative Immersion this year to help foster a more collaborative environment for success in the English-language market.

1. Production performance envelopes will be awarded to the top 15% of films earning a minimum of $500,000 in box office

The new threshold, which is more in step with market realities for English Canadian cinema, will encourage new players to access the envelope system.

2. Introduction of performance development envelopes of up to $150,000

Companies achieving success at the box office, but not earning a sufficient envelope for ensuing production (less than $750,000), will receive the benefits of an envelope for use in the development of subsequent projects. This change both maximizes the efficiency of the production performance envelopes—by ensuring that production performance envelopes are large enough to significantly contribute to production financing—and provides greater autonomy for producers not reaching this bar to develop new projects.

3. Eligible feature-length documentaries now qualify for production performance envelopes of up to $1 million

This move recognizes the performance of Canadian feature-length documentaries that achieve success at the domestic box office. This is in line with the recommendation by the Standing Committee that a revised feature film policy recognize long-form documentaries.

4. Greater autonomy for distributors to commit resources based on market realities

Telefilm will award distribution envelopes to all qualifying companies by eliminating the previous minimum cut-off of $500,000 for marketing activities.

Developing and promoting the Canadian audiovisual industry Telefilm Canada is a federal cultural agency dedicated to the development and promotion of the Canadian audiovisual industry. Telefilm provides financial support to the private sector to create distinctively Canadian productions that appeal to domestic and international audiences. The Corporation also administers the funding programs of the Canadian Television Fund.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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