Nov 24, 2020
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21st Annual Gemini Awards

RICHMOND, B.C. (CP) _ A behind-the-scenes television drama about a madcap Shakespearean theatre festival captured three more Gemini Awards Saturday night.

"Slings and Arrows," which chronicles life at the fictional New Burbage Theatre Festival, won best dramatic series.

Mark McKinney and Martha Burns were also honoured for best performances by an actor and actress in a continuing leading role for their work on the program. For the first time in its 21-year history, the awards for the best in Canadian television were handed outside Toronto – at the River Rock Casino in Richmond, B.C. The break with tradition aimed to inject new energy into the Geminis, which also featured a live performance by Lukas Rossi, the Canadian-born winner of Rock Star: Supernova.

The wins for "Slings and Arrows," broadcast on the Movie Network, brought the show’s total Gemini tally this year up to six. The program also won awards for best direction, best writing and best performance by an actress in a supporting role, in an award ceremony last month in Toronto.

"What separated this show from a number of other shows is the number of theatre actors along with the television and movie actors," producer Sari Friedland said backstage.

Dramatic biographies about two Canadian political legends were shut out of Saturday night’s awards, losing the best dramatic mini-series honour to Liftetime’s "Human Trafficking," a four-hour drama about the scourge of sexual slavery.

"Prairie Giant: The Tommy Douglas Story" and "Trudeau II: Maverick in the Making," had also been nominated in the category.

It’s the second year in a row that a drama about modern-day slavery has captured the award _ last year, CBC’s "Sex Traffic" won in the same category.

But Canadiana took the day in the comedy: CTV’s hit sitcom "Corner Gas" got the nod for best comedy program or series and the gang from classic favourite "This Hour Has 22 Minutes" won for best ensemble performance in a comedy program or series.

"As a cast on a show like that, it really is all about the writers, we just bring it, wear a mustache, put on a hat," said Shawn Majunder in accepting the award.

He admitted backstage he and co-star Mark Critch didn’t think they were going to win _ which is why he and Critch forgot to thank Cathy Jones and Gavin Crawford, their other two cast members on stage.

CBC’s comedy "Hatching, Matching and Dispatching," about the Furey’s family’s adventures offering wedding, funeral and ambulance services to one Newfoundland town, won for best writing in a comedy or variety program or series for best writing in a comedy or variety program or series.

The mini-series "One Dead Indian" walked away with multiple awards, clinching the honours for best direction and best writing in a dramatic program or mini-series.

The TV movie traces the events that led up to the Sept. 6, 1995, shooting of Dudley George in Ontario’s Ipperwash Provincial Park and the subsequent trial of the provincial police officer charged in his death.

Two inspirational tales of sports heroes coming back from serious illness and injury were also recognized on Saturday.

Tom McCamus won best performance by an actor in a leading role in a dramatic program or mini-series for his portrayal of Canada’s favourite hockey dad, Walter Gretzky, in CBC’s "Waking Up Wally: The Walter Gretzky Story."

And Wendy Crewson was honoured for her work playing Lorraine Evanshen, the wife of Canadian Football League Hall-of-Famer, Terry Evanshen, who lost his memory after a car crash. She won best performance by an actress in a leading role in a dramatic program or mini-series.

Crewson said she hoped she did justice to the character but admitted it was hard making the performance as full as possible within the time constaints of television programs.

The National Film Board’s "House Calls" won the Donald Brittain Award for Best Social/Political Documentary Program. The film follows Dr. Mark Nowaczynski on his quest to maintain the tradition of in-home medical care.

For the second year in a row, CityLine’s Marilyn Denis nabbed the Viewers’ Choice Award for best lifestyle host. The winner of that award was chosen via internet voting on the Gemini awards website over the last several weeks. Throughout the show, viewers were treated to vignettes of each of the nominees in that category poking fun at their off-screen screen alter-egos.

Also for the second year in a row, Global TV’s Kevin Newman won best news anchor, though the best newscast award was given to "CBC News: The National" in October’s award ceremony. CTV News declined to participate in this year’s awards, saying the nomination process wasn’t worth their time.

"CTV news does some outstanding work, it would have been nice to be in competition with them," said Newman, backstage after his win.

But CBC stalwart Ron MacLean did win for best host or interviewer in a sports program or sportscast for "Hockey Day in Canada."

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

21st Annual Gemini Awards

RICHMOND, B.C. (CP) _ A behind-the-scenes television drama about a madcap Shakespearean theatre festival captured three more Gemini Awards Saturday night.

"Slings and Arrows," which chronicles life at the fictional New Burbage Theatre Festival, won best dramatic series.

Mark McKinney and Martha Burns were also honoured for best performances by an actor and actress in a continuing leading role for their work on the program. For the first time in its 21-year history, the awards for the best in Canadian television were handed outside Toronto – at the River Rock Casino in Richmond, B.C. The break with tradition aimed to inject new energy into the Geminis, which also featured a live performance by Lukas Rossi, the Canadian-born winner of Rock Star: Supernova.

The wins for "Slings and Arrows," broadcast on the Movie Network, brought the show’s total Gemini tally this year up to six. The program also won awards for best direction, best writing and best performance by an actress in a supporting role, in an award ceremony last month in Toronto.

"What separated this show from a number of other shows is the number of theatre actors along with the television and movie actors," producer Sari Friedland said backstage.

Dramatic biographies about two Canadian political legends were shut out of Saturday night’s awards, losing the best dramatic mini-series honour to Liftetime’s "Human Trafficking," a four-hour drama about the scourge of sexual slavery.

"Prairie Giant: The Tommy Douglas Story" and "Trudeau II: Maverick in the Making," had also been nominated in the category.

It’s the second year in a row that a drama about modern-day slavery has captured the award _ last year, CBC’s "Sex Traffic" won in the same category.

But Canadiana took the day in the comedy: CTV’s hit sitcom "Corner Gas" got the nod for best comedy program or series and the gang from classic favourite "This Hour Has 22 Minutes" won for best ensemble performance in a comedy program or series.

"As a cast on a show like that, it really is all about the writers, we just bring it, wear a mustache, put on a hat," said Shawn Majunder in accepting the award.

He admitted backstage he and co-star Mark Critch didn’t think they were going to win _ which is why he and Critch forgot to thank Cathy Jones and Gavin Crawford, their other two cast members on stage.

CBC’s comedy "Hatching, Matching and Dispatching," about the Furey’s family’s adventures offering wedding, funeral and ambulance services to one Newfoundland town, won for best writing in a comedy or variety program or series for best writing in a comedy or variety program or series.

The mini-series "One Dead Indian" walked away with multiple awards, clinching the honours for best direction and best writing in a dramatic program or mini-series.

The TV movie traces the events that led up to the Sept. 6, 1995, shooting of Dudley George in Ontario’s Ipperwash Provincial Park and the subsequent trial of the provincial police officer charged in his death.

Two inspirational tales of sports heroes coming back from serious illness and injury were also recognized on Saturday.

Tom McCamus won best performance by an actor in a leading role in a dramatic program or mini-series for his portrayal of Canada’s favourite hockey dad, Walter Gretzky, in CBC’s "Waking Up Wally: The Walter Gretzky Story."

And Wendy Crewson was honoured for her work playing Lorraine Evanshen, the wife of Canadian Football League Hall-of-Famer, Terry Evanshen, who lost his memory after a car crash. She won best performance by an actress in a leading role in a dramatic program or mini-series.

Crewson said she hoped she did justice to the character but admitted it was hard making the performance as full as possible within the time constaints of television programs.

The National Film Board’s "House Calls" won the Donald Brittain Award for Best Social/Political Documentary Program. The film follows Dr. Mark Nowaczynski on his quest to maintain the tradition of in-home medical care.

For the second year in a row, CityLine’s Marilyn Denis nabbed the Viewers’ Choice Award for best lifestyle host. The winner of that award was chosen via internet voting on the Gemini awards website over the last several weeks. Throughout the show, viewers were treated to vignettes of each of the nominees in that category poking fun at their off-screen screen alter-egos.

Also for the second year in a row, Global TV’s Kevin Newman won best news anchor, though the best newscast award was given to "CBC News: The National" in October’s award ceremony. CTV News declined to participate in this year’s awards, saying the nomination process wasn’t worth their time.

"CTV news does some outstanding work, it would have been nice to be in competition with them," said Newman, backstage after his win.

But CBC stalwart Ron MacLean did win for best host or interviewer in a sports program or sportscast for "Hockey Day in Canada."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

21st Annual Gemini Awards

RICHMOND, B.C. (CP) _ A behind-the-scenes television drama about a madcap Shakespearean theatre festival captured three more Gemini Awards Saturday night.

"Slings and Arrows," which chronicles life at the fictional New Burbage Theatre Festival, won best dramatic series.

Mark McKinney and Martha Burns were also honoured for best performances by an actor and actress in a continuing leading role for their work on the program. For the first time in its 21-year history, the awards for the best in Canadian television were handed outside Toronto – at the River Rock Casino in Richmond, B.C. The break with tradition aimed to inject new energy into the Geminis, which also featured a live performance by Lukas Rossi, the Canadian-born winner of Rock Star: Supernova.

The wins for "Slings and Arrows," broadcast on the Movie Network, brought the show’s total Gemini tally this year up to six. The program also won awards for best direction, best writing and best performance by an actress in a supporting role, in an award ceremony last month in Toronto.

"What separated this show from a number of other shows is the number of theatre actors along with the television and movie actors," producer Sari Friedland said backstage.

Dramatic biographies about two Canadian political legends were shut out of Saturday night’s awards, losing the best dramatic mini-series honour to Liftetime’s "Human Trafficking," a four-hour drama about the scourge of sexual slavery.

"Prairie Giant: The Tommy Douglas Story" and "Trudeau II: Maverick in the Making," had also been nominated in the category.

It’s the second year in a row that a drama about modern-day slavery has captured the award _ last year, CBC’s "Sex Traffic" won in the same category.

But Canadiana took the day in the comedy: CTV’s hit sitcom "Corner Gas" got the nod for best comedy program or series and the gang from classic favourite "This Hour Has 22 Minutes" won for best ensemble performance in a comedy program or series.

"As a cast on a show like that, it really is all about the writers, we just bring it, wear a mustache, put on a hat," said Shawn Majunder in accepting the award.

He admitted backstage he and co-star Mark Critch didn’t think they were going to win _ which is why he and Critch forgot to thank Cathy Jones and Gavin Crawford, their other two cast members on stage.

CBC’s comedy "Hatching, Matching and Dispatching," about the Furey’s family’s adventures offering wedding, funeral and ambulance services to one Newfoundland town, won for best writing in a comedy or variety program or series for best writing in a comedy or variety program or series.

The mini-series "One Dead Indian" walked away with multiple awards, clinching the honours for best direction and best writing in a dramatic program or mini-series.

The TV movie traces the events that led up to the Sept. 6, 1995, shooting of Dudley George in Ontario’s Ipperwash Provincial Park and the subsequent trial of the provincial police officer charged in his death.

Two inspirational tales of sports heroes coming back from serious illness and injury were also recognized on Saturday.

Tom McCamus won best performance by an actor in a leading role in a dramatic program or mini-series for his portrayal of Canada’s favourite hockey dad, Walter Gretzky, in CBC’s "Waking Up Wally: The Walter Gretzky Story."

And Wendy Crewson was honoured for her work playing Lorraine Evanshen, the wife of Canadian Football League Hall-of-Famer, Terry Evanshen, who lost his memory after a car crash. She won best performance by an actress in a leading role in a dramatic program or mini-series.

Crewson said she hoped she did justice to the character but admitted it was hard making the performance as full as possible within the time constaints of television programs.

The National Film Board’s "House Calls" won the Donald Brittain Award for Best Social/Political Documentary Program. The film follows Dr. Mark Nowaczynski on his quest to maintain the tradition of in-home medical care.

For the second year in a row, CityLine’s Marilyn Denis nabbed the Viewers’ Choice Award for best lifestyle host. The winner of that award was chosen via internet voting on the Gemini awards website over the last several weeks. Throughout the show, viewers were treated to vignettes of each of the nominees in that category poking fun at their off-screen screen alter-egos.

Also for the second year in a row, Global TV’s Kevin Newman won best news anchor, though the best newscast award was given to "CBC News: The National" in October’s award ceremony. CTV News declined to participate in this year’s awards, saying the nomination process wasn’t worth their time.

"CTV news does some outstanding work, it would have been nice to be in competition with them," said Newman, backstage after his win.

But CBC stalwart Ron MacLean did win for best host or interviewer in a sports program or sportscast for "Hockey Day in Canada."

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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