Nov 24, 2020
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0-3 in latest CFTPA press release

TORONTO – Those with a score-keeping bent got their money’s worth from the latest CFTPA press release – a statement with three things to say, all at variance with the truth.

Just to begin, the CFTPA claims that ACTRA agreed to bargain on the basis of a "bargaining roadmap" developed by the CFTPA. This is at precise variance from the truth. In fact CFTPA lead bargainer John Barrack’s principal contribution to developing a roadmap has been to repeatedly ask "what do you want to do next?” Bargaining got underway this past week on the basis of a detailed bargaining outline proposed by ACTRA and grudgingly accepted by the CFTPA.

The CFTPA mourns the fact that bargaining has been disrupted by legal proceedings. The CFTPA itself initiated that disruption, by serving ACTRA with an ultimatum demanding that ACTRA agree to the CFTPA’s view that it is not subject to any law.

This letter was served on ACTRA at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 7, giving ACTRA ultimatums and demanding a response by 3:00 p.m. Friday, December 8.

ACTRA responded to this legal provocation with a counter brief.

Mr. Barrack then announced that negotiations would likely not now go forward, after ACTRA lead bargainer Stephen Waddell offered to continue bargaining as scheduled next week. Mr. Barrack’s conduct suggests he is deliberately seeking to provoke an industrial dispute.

Finally, the CFTPA offers a summary of its view that producers in Canada are not subject to the law. The CFTPA is claiming that producers outside of Quebec are not subject to law because, as the CFTPA acknowledges, producers in the province of Quebec ARE subject to law. This makes no sense. 

The bargaining relationship between producers and ACTRA under the national IPA has existed for approximately 40 years, through successive terms. The CFTPA seems to want to ruin this relationship.

More than 50,000 Canadians working in Canada’s $4-billion film and television industry are facing serious potential disruption because of the CFTPA’s bargaining tactics. ACTRA hopes that the CFTPA will see the light, and will bargain a renewed IPA with ACTRA on the dates already scheduled this week.

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Headline, Industry News

0-3 in latest CFTPA press release

TORONTO – Those with a score-keeping bent got their money’s worth from the latest CFTPA press release – a statement with three things to say, all at variance with the truth.

Just to begin, the CFTPA claims that ACTRA agreed to bargain on the basis of a "bargaining roadmap" developed by the CFTPA. This is at precise variance from the truth. In fact CFTPA lead bargainer John Barrack’s principal contribution to developing a roadmap has been to repeatedly ask "what do you want to do next?” Bargaining got underway this past week on the basis of a detailed bargaining outline proposed by ACTRA and grudgingly accepted by the CFTPA.

The CFTPA mourns the fact that bargaining has been disrupted by legal proceedings. The CFTPA itself initiated that disruption, by serving ACTRA with an ultimatum demanding that ACTRA agree to the CFTPA’s view that it is not subject to any law.

This letter was served on ACTRA at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 7, giving ACTRA ultimatums and demanding a response by 3:00 p.m. Friday, December 8.

ACTRA responded to this legal provocation with a counter brief.

Mr. Barrack then announced that negotiations would likely not now go forward, after ACTRA lead bargainer Stephen Waddell offered to continue bargaining as scheduled next week. Mr. Barrack’s conduct suggests he is deliberately seeking to provoke an industrial dispute.

Finally, the CFTPA offers a summary of its view that producers in Canada are not subject to the law. The CFTPA is claiming that producers outside of Quebec are not subject to law because, as the CFTPA acknowledges, producers in the province of Quebec ARE subject to law. This makes no sense. 

The bargaining relationship between producers and ACTRA under the national IPA has existed for approximately 40 years, through successive terms. The CFTPA seems to want to ruin this relationship.

More than 50,000 Canadians working in Canada’s $4-billion film and television industry are facing serious potential disruption because of the CFTPA’s bargaining tactics. ACTRA hopes that the CFTPA will see the light, and will bargain a renewed IPA with ACTRA on the dates already scheduled this week.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

0-3 in latest CFTPA press release

TORONTO – Those with a score-keeping bent got their money’s worth from the latest CFTPA press release – a statement with three things to say, all at variance with the truth.

Just to begin, the CFTPA claims that ACTRA agreed to bargain on the basis of a "bargaining roadmap" developed by the CFTPA. This is at precise variance from the truth. In fact CFTPA lead bargainer John Barrack’s principal contribution to developing a roadmap has been to repeatedly ask "what do you want to do next?” Bargaining got underway this past week on the basis of a detailed bargaining outline proposed by ACTRA and grudgingly accepted by the CFTPA.

The CFTPA mourns the fact that bargaining has been disrupted by legal proceedings. The CFTPA itself initiated that disruption, by serving ACTRA with an ultimatum demanding that ACTRA agree to the CFTPA’s view that it is not subject to any law.

This letter was served on ACTRA at 4:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 7, giving ACTRA ultimatums and demanding a response by 3:00 p.m. Friday, December 8.

ACTRA responded to this legal provocation with a counter brief.

Mr. Barrack then announced that negotiations would likely not now go forward, after ACTRA lead bargainer Stephen Waddell offered to continue bargaining as scheduled next week. Mr. Barrack’s conduct suggests he is deliberately seeking to provoke an industrial dispute.

Finally, the CFTPA offers a summary of its view that producers in Canada are not subject to the law. The CFTPA is claiming that producers outside of Quebec are not subject to law because, as the CFTPA acknowledges, producers in the province of Quebec ARE subject to law. This makes no sense. 

The bargaining relationship between producers and ACTRA under the national IPA has existed for approximately 40 years, through successive terms. The CFTPA seems to want to ruin this relationship.

More than 50,000 Canadians working in Canada’s $4-billion film and television industry are facing serious potential disruption because of the CFTPA’s bargaining tactics. ACTRA hopes that the CFTPA will see the light, and will bargain a renewed IPA with ACTRA on the dates already scheduled this week.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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