Nov 25, 2020
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Headline, Industry News

ACTRA asks for 50% increase

Montreal РThe Canadian Film and Television Production Association (CFTPA) and the Association des producteurs de films et de t̩l̩vision du Qu̩bec (APFTQ) resumed negotiations with ACTRA in Montreal today. The Producers and ACTRA negotiated through Mary-Ellen Cummings, a neutral third party facilitator, who was tasked with clarifying the positions of both parties around the issues of New Media and wages in an attempt to iron out the few remaining details standing in the way of a deal.

The CFTPA and APFTQ saw today’s negotiations as a final attempt to avoid a long and difficult labour dispute involving the courts. Despite her hard work, the facilitator was not able to bridge the widening divide when ACTRA demanded a 50% increase of its fees.

“We came to Montreal to finalize our proposals on both New Media and wages and were feeling that we are very close to finding the deal. I’m deeply disappointed that ACTRA has taken this opportunity to ask for an unprecedented 50% increase with regard to its fees on New Media production.” said John Barrack, Chef Negotiator, CFTPA “This illustrates the sharp contrast between ACTRA and the other unions and guilds in the production sector”.

“This labour dispute is incredibly disruptive to the Canadian production community and is affecting the lives of all of those who work in the sector. We are preparing for a very long strike.” said Julie Patry, Attorney, Director, Industrial Relations, APFTQ, “There is very little left for us to do, we’ve played all our cards and will leave this to the courts.”

As a result of ACTRA pressing for a 50% increase the Producers have been forced into a difficult position and will be not be able to avoid court action. The Producers took every step possible to find a deal and avoid court proceedings and will appear in the Provincial Court of Ontario to ask the court to rule on the legality of the ACTRA Strike as well as the unlawful Continuation Letters. The Producers have tabled a generous New Media payment structure that pays performers three times, when a New Media production is made, when it is used, and if the production is ever converted to a conventional use like television or DVD.

“People will ask, why are the producers going to court? The simple answer is that our agreement states that when we have a difference of opinion, we go to arbitration. ACTRA has refused to work with us on finding an arbitrator, leaving us with little choice but to ask the court to appoint one to look at this matter as quickly as possible.” added Barrack.

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Headline, Industry News

ACTRA asks for 50% increase

Montreal РThe Canadian Film and Television Production Association (CFTPA) and the Association des producteurs de films et de t̩l̩vision du Qu̩bec (APFTQ) resumed negotiations with ACTRA in Montreal today. The Producers and ACTRA negotiated through Mary-Ellen Cummings, a neutral third party facilitator, who was tasked with clarifying the positions of both parties around the issues of New Media and wages in an attempt to iron out the few remaining details standing in the way of a deal.

The CFTPA and APFTQ saw today’s negotiations as a final attempt to avoid a long and difficult labour dispute involving the courts. Despite her hard work, the facilitator was not able to bridge the widening divide when ACTRA demanded a 50% increase of its fees.

“We came to Montreal to finalize our proposals on both New Media and wages and were feeling that we are very close to finding the deal. I’m deeply disappointed that ACTRA has taken this opportunity to ask for an unprecedented 50% increase with regard to its fees on New Media production.” said John Barrack, Chef Negotiator, CFTPA “This illustrates the sharp contrast between ACTRA and the other unions and guilds in the production sector”.

“This labour dispute is incredibly disruptive to the Canadian production community and is affecting the lives of all of those who work in the sector. We are preparing for a very long strike.” said Julie Patry, Attorney, Director, Industrial Relations, APFTQ, “There is very little left for us to do, we’ve played all our cards and will leave this to the courts.”

As a result of ACTRA pressing for a 50% increase the Producers have been forced into a difficult position and will be not be able to avoid court action. The Producers took every step possible to find a deal and avoid court proceedings and will appear in the Provincial Court of Ontario to ask the court to rule on the legality of the ACTRA Strike as well as the unlawful Continuation Letters. The Producers have tabled a generous New Media payment structure that pays performers three times, when a New Media production is made, when it is used, and if the production is ever converted to a conventional use like television or DVD.

“People will ask, why are the producers going to court? The simple answer is that our agreement states that when we have a difference of opinion, we go to arbitration. ACTRA has refused to work with us on finding an arbitrator, leaving us with little choice but to ask the court to appoint one to look at this matter as quickly as possible.” added Barrack.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

ACTRA asks for 50% increase

Montreal РThe Canadian Film and Television Production Association (CFTPA) and the Association des producteurs de films et de t̩l̩vision du Qu̩bec (APFTQ) resumed negotiations with ACTRA in Montreal today. The Producers and ACTRA negotiated through Mary-Ellen Cummings, a neutral third party facilitator, who was tasked with clarifying the positions of both parties around the issues of New Media and wages in an attempt to iron out the few remaining details standing in the way of a deal.

The CFTPA and APFTQ saw today’s negotiations as a final attempt to avoid a long and difficult labour dispute involving the courts. Despite her hard work, the facilitator was not able to bridge the widening divide when ACTRA demanded a 50% increase of its fees.

“We came to Montreal to finalize our proposals on both New Media and wages and were feeling that we are very close to finding the deal. I’m deeply disappointed that ACTRA has taken this opportunity to ask for an unprecedented 50% increase with regard to its fees on New Media production.” said John Barrack, Chef Negotiator, CFTPA “This illustrates the sharp contrast between ACTRA and the other unions and guilds in the production sector”.

“This labour dispute is incredibly disruptive to the Canadian production community and is affecting the lives of all of those who work in the sector. We are preparing for a very long strike.” said Julie Patry, Attorney, Director, Industrial Relations, APFTQ, “There is very little left for us to do, we’ve played all our cards and will leave this to the courts.”

As a result of ACTRA pressing for a 50% increase the Producers have been forced into a difficult position and will be not be able to avoid court action. The Producers took every step possible to find a deal and avoid court proceedings and will appear in the Provincial Court of Ontario to ask the court to rule on the legality of the ACTRA Strike as well as the unlawful Continuation Letters. The Producers have tabled a generous New Media payment structure that pays performers three times, when a New Media production is made, when it is used, and if the production is ever converted to a conventional use like television or DVD.

“People will ask, why are the producers going to court? The simple answer is that our agreement states that when we have a difference of opinion, we go to arbitration. ACTRA has refused to work with us on finding an arbitrator, leaving us with little choice but to ask the court to appoint one to look at this matter as quickly as possible.” added Barrack.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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