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Hot Docs festival award winners

Toronto, The jury is in, and the six awards for films in official competition at the 2007 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival, along with a slew of other awards, were handed out on Friday, April 27 at a ceremony at the Isabel Bader Theatre. The Hot Docs Awards Presentation, hosted by documentary filmmaker and television journalist Avi Lewis, drew industry heavyweights from across Canada and around the world and saw more than $50,000 in cash prizes awarded.

In the Best Canadian Feature Documentary category, the award went to Bryan Friedman’s THE BODYBUILDER AND I (Canada, 90min), the director’s look at his complicated, estranged relationship with his elderly, body-building father. In addition to the award, Friedman was also presented with a $5000 cash prize, courtesy of the Documentary Channel.

The Special Jury Prize in the Canadian Feature Documentary category was awarded to Serge Giguère’s DRIVEN BY DREAMS (Canada, 83 min), an inspiring look at a group of seniors who’ve embraced their twilight years with passion and a lust for life. In addition to the award, Giguère was also presented with a $5000 FAP prize, courtesy of the National Film Board of Canada. Other finalists in the Canadian Feature Documentary category included John Zaritsky’s THE SUICIDE TOURIST (Canada, 90min) and Arturo Perez Torres’ SUPER AMIGOS (Canada, 82 min).

In the Best International Feature Documentary category, the award went to Ulrike Franke and Michael Loeken’s LOSERS AND WINNERS (Germany, 96min), an examination of the collision of cultures and the impact of globalization as a German smelting plant is painstakingly disassembled to be rebuilt in China’s new industrial heartland. In addition to the award, Franke and Loeken were also presented with a $5000 cash prize courtesy of Hot Docs.

The Special Jury Prize in the International Feature Documentary category was awarded to Michael Skolnik’s WITHOUT THE KING (USA, 84 min), a revealing look at the growing civil unrest in the impoverished nation of Swaziland, Africa’s last remaining absolute monarchy. Other finalists in the International Feature Documentary category included Irene Taylor Brodsky’s HEAR AND NOW (USA, 84 min) and Annie Sundberg and Ricki Stern’s THE DEVIL CAME ON HORSEBACK (USA, 88 min).

The Best Mid-Length Documentary Award, for films 30 – 59 minutes in length, was presented to Johanna Lunn’s FORGIVENESS: STORIES FOR OUR TIME (Canada, 56 min), a powerful and personal exploration of anger, grief and the process of forgiveness through four people whose lives have been ripped apart by murder and terrorism. Other finalists in the Best Mid-Length Documentary category included Johanna Straub, Sandra Kulbach, Michaela Schaeuble and Nan Mellinger’s MOTHERS - 4 PIECES (Germany, 58 min) and Sonja Linden’s NO MAN IS AN ISLAND (Finland, 40 min).

The Best Short Documentary Award, for films up to 29 minutes in length, was presented to Arturo Cabanas’ MAN UP (USA, 11 min), a shocking snapshot of a father who, through

belittlement and punishment, is attempting to raise his son to be a soldier. Other finalists in the Best Short Documentary category included Mark Craig’s TALK TO ME (US, 23 min) and Kees van der Geest’s SHIT AND CHICKS (Netherlands, 10 min).

The Don Haig Award, an annual prize awarded to an emerging Canadian director whose work has bridged the documentary and fiction filmmaking worlds, was presented to Toronto-based filmmaker Hubert Davis, whose work includes the Academy Award nominated short documentary HARDWOOD and the fiction film ARUBA. The $10,000 cash prize, presented in memory of Don Haig, the much beloved ‘godfather of Canadian cinema’ who gave generously of his time and resources to support emerging directors, can be used for whatever the recipient needs towards his/her craft.

The inaugural Lindalee Tracey Award, founded in memory of the creative, socially-engaged documentary director, and awarded to an emerging Canadian filmmaker who works in the spirit of Lindalee – with passion, humour, a strong sense of social justice and a personal point of view – was presented to Edmonton-based Trevor Anderson whose work includes the short films RUGBURN and ROCK POCKETS. Accompanying the Lindalee Tracey Award is a $5000 cash prize.

Also at the ceremony, the Hot Docs Board of Directors presented acclaimed Dutch director Heddy Honigmann with the annual Outstanding Achievement Award. As part of the honour, Honigmann’s work is being featured in a retrospective programme during the Festival. She will also be a special guest in the final Hot Docs Talks panel, The Art of the Interview, on Saturday, April 28 from 1:00pm – 2:30pm.

Finally, in addition to the above awards, prizes associated with Rendezvous, Hot Docs’ service which arranges for one-on-one pitch meetings between producers with projects in development and commissioning editors, were also announced. The OMNI Prize for Best Third Language/Ethno-Cultural Pitch, which grants $10,000 in development money via the OMNI Diversity Television Independent Producers Fund, was awarded to 1001 PERFORMANCES, pitched by Josh Miller of Panacea Entertainment. The CBC Newsworld Camera Prize, which provides a $10,000 camera rental package for the best pitch received by the CBC, was awarded to SOUNDS LIKE A REVOLUTION, pitched by Summer Preney of Deltatime Productions. The NBC News Archive Prize for the best pitch at Rendezvous, which awards $2000 worth of rights for footage licensed by NBC News Archives, was awarded to GRANNY POWER, pitched by Isabelle Couture of Les Films de L’Isle.

The Hot Docs Audience Award, which is given to the film with the highest rating based on audience ballot, and the CIDA Award, a $5000 cash prize awarded to a filmmaker for the best

Canadian film on an international development issue, will be announced on Monday, April 30

The Hot Docs Festival Juries are:

Canadian Feature Documentary

Mark Achbar, Claas Danielsen, Ibtisam Mara’ana

International Feature Documentary

Judith Helfand, Eugene Jarecki, Amir Labaki

Short and Mid-Length Documentary

Simon Houpt, Ivana Milosevic, Alexandre Trudeau

The Don Haig Award Jury are:

Joan Schafer (Chair), Michael McNamara, Louise Lore, Brigitte Berman

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Front Page, Industry News

Hot Docs festival award winners

Toronto, The jury is in, and the six awards for films in official competition at the 2007 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival, along with a slew of other awards, were handed out on Friday, April 27 at a ceremony at the Isabel Bader Theatre. The Hot Docs Awards Presentation, hosted by documentary filmmaker and television journalist Avi Lewis, drew industry heavyweights from across Canada and around the world and saw more than $50,000 in cash prizes awarded.

In the Best Canadian Feature Documentary category, the award went to Bryan Friedman’s THE BODYBUILDER AND I (Canada, 90min), the director’s look at his complicated, estranged relationship with his elderly, body-building father. In addition to the award, Friedman was also presented with a $5000 cash prize, courtesy of the Documentary Channel.

The Special Jury Prize in the Canadian Feature Documentary category was awarded to Serge Giguère’s DRIVEN BY DREAMS (Canada, 83 min), an inspiring look at a group of seniors who’ve embraced their twilight years with passion and a lust for life. In addition to the award, Giguère was also presented with a $5000 FAP prize, courtesy of the National Film Board of Canada. Other finalists in the Canadian Feature Documentary category included John Zaritsky’s THE SUICIDE TOURIST (Canada, 90min) and Arturo Perez Torres’ SUPER AMIGOS (Canada, 82 min).

In the Best International Feature Documentary category, the award went to Ulrike Franke and Michael Loeken’s LOSERS AND WINNERS (Germany, 96min), an examination of the collision of cultures and the impact of globalization as a German smelting plant is painstakingly disassembled to be rebuilt in China’s new industrial heartland. In addition to the award, Franke and Loeken were also presented with a $5000 cash prize courtesy of Hot Docs.

The Special Jury Prize in the International Feature Documentary category was awarded to Michael Skolnik’s WITHOUT THE KING (USA, 84 min), a revealing look at the growing civil unrest in the impoverished nation of Swaziland, Africa’s last remaining absolute monarchy. Other finalists in the International Feature Documentary category included Irene Taylor Brodsky’s HEAR AND NOW (USA, 84 min) and Annie Sundberg and Ricki Stern’s THE DEVIL CAME ON HORSEBACK (USA, 88 min).

The Best Mid-Length Documentary Award, for films 30 – 59 minutes in length, was presented to Johanna Lunn’s FORGIVENESS: STORIES FOR OUR TIME (Canada, 56 min), a powerful and personal exploration of anger, grief and the process of forgiveness through four people whose lives have been ripped apart by murder and terrorism. Other finalists in the Best Mid-Length Documentary category included Johanna Straub, Sandra Kulbach, Michaela Schaeuble and Nan Mellinger’s MOTHERS - 4 PIECES (Germany, 58 min) and Sonja Linden’s NO MAN IS AN ISLAND (Finland, 40 min).

The Best Short Documentary Award, for films up to 29 minutes in length, was presented to Arturo Cabanas’ MAN UP (USA, 11 min), a shocking snapshot of a father who, through

belittlement and punishment, is attempting to raise his son to be a soldier. Other finalists in the Best Short Documentary category included Mark Craig’s TALK TO ME (US, 23 min) and Kees van der Geest’s SHIT AND CHICKS (Netherlands, 10 min).

The Don Haig Award, an annual prize awarded to an emerging Canadian director whose work has bridged the documentary and fiction filmmaking worlds, was presented to Toronto-based filmmaker Hubert Davis, whose work includes the Academy Award nominated short documentary HARDWOOD and the fiction film ARUBA. The $10,000 cash prize, presented in memory of Don Haig, the much beloved ‘godfather of Canadian cinema’ who gave generously of his time and resources to support emerging directors, can be used for whatever the recipient needs towards his/her craft.

The inaugural Lindalee Tracey Award, founded in memory of the creative, socially-engaged documentary director, and awarded to an emerging Canadian filmmaker who works in the spirit of Lindalee – with passion, humour, a strong sense of social justice and a personal point of view – was presented to Edmonton-based Trevor Anderson whose work includes the short films RUGBURN and ROCK POCKETS. Accompanying the Lindalee Tracey Award is a $5000 cash prize.

Also at the ceremony, the Hot Docs Board of Directors presented acclaimed Dutch director Heddy Honigmann with the annual Outstanding Achievement Award. As part of the honour, Honigmann’s work is being featured in a retrospective programme during the Festival. She will also be a special guest in the final Hot Docs Talks panel, The Art of the Interview, on Saturday, April 28 from 1:00pm – 2:30pm.

Finally, in addition to the above awards, prizes associated with Rendezvous, Hot Docs’ service which arranges for one-on-one pitch meetings between producers with projects in development and commissioning editors, were also announced. The OMNI Prize for Best Third Language/Ethno-Cultural Pitch, which grants $10,000 in development money via the OMNI Diversity Television Independent Producers Fund, was awarded to 1001 PERFORMANCES, pitched by Josh Miller of Panacea Entertainment. The CBC Newsworld Camera Prize, which provides a $10,000 camera rental package for the best pitch received by the CBC, was awarded to SOUNDS LIKE A REVOLUTION, pitched by Summer Preney of Deltatime Productions. The NBC News Archive Prize for the best pitch at Rendezvous, which awards $2000 worth of rights for footage licensed by NBC News Archives, was awarded to GRANNY POWER, pitched by Isabelle Couture of Les Films de L’Isle.

The Hot Docs Audience Award, which is given to the film with the highest rating based on audience ballot, and the CIDA Award, a $5000 cash prize awarded to a filmmaker for the best

Canadian film on an international development issue, will be announced on Monday, April 30

The Hot Docs Festival Juries are:

Canadian Feature Documentary

Mark Achbar, Claas Danielsen, Ibtisam Mara’ana

International Feature Documentary

Judith Helfand, Eugene Jarecki, Amir Labaki

Short and Mid-Length Documentary

Simon Houpt, Ivana Milosevic, Alexandre Trudeau

The Don Haig Award Jury are:

Joan Schafer (Chair), Michael McNamara, Louise Lore, Brigitte Berman

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Hot Docs festival award winners

Toronto, The jury is in, and the six awards for films in official competition at the 2007 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival, along with a slew of other awards, were handed out on Friday, April 27 at a ceremony at the Isabel Bader Theatre. The Hot Docs Awards Presentation, hosted by documentary filmmaker and television journalist Avi Lewis, drew industry heavyweights from across Canada and around the world and saw more than $50,000 in cash prizes awarded.

In the Best Canadian Feature Documentary category, the award went to Bryan Friedman’s THE BODYBUILDER AND I (Canada, 90min), the director’s look at his complicated, estranged relationship with his elderly, body-building father. In addition to the award, Friedman was also presented with a $5000 cash prize, courtesy of the Documentary Channel.

The Special Jury Prize in the Canadian Feature Documentary category was awarded to Serge Giguère’s DRIVEN BY DREAMS (Canada, 83 min), an inspiring look at a group of seniors who’ve embraced their twilight years with passion and a lust for life. In addition to the award, Giguère was also presented with a $5000 FAP prize, courtesy of the National Film Board of Canada. Other finalists in the Canadian Feature Documentary category included John Zaritsky’s THE SUICIDE TOURIST (Canada, 90min) and Arturo Perez Torres’ SUPER AMIGOS (Canada, 82 min).

In the Best International Feature Documentary category, the award went to Ulrike Franke and Michael Loeken’s LOSERS AND WINNERS (Germany, 96min), an examination of the collision of cultures and the impact of globalization as a German smelting plant is painstakingly disassembled to be rebuilt in China’s new industrial heartland. In addition to the award, Franke and Loeken were also presented with a $5000 cash prize courtesy of Hot Docs.

The Special Jury Prize in the International Feature Documentary category was awarded to Michael Skolnik’s WITHOUT THE KING (USA, 84 min), a revealing look at the growing civil unrest in the impoverished nation of Swaziland, Africa’s last remaining absolute monarchy. Other finalists in the International Feature Documentary category included Irene Taylor Brodsky’s HEAR AND NOW (USA, 84 min) and Annie Sundberg and Ricki Stern’s THE DEVIL CAME ON HORSEBACK (USA, 88 min).

The Best Mid-Length Documentary Award, for films 30 – 59 minutes in length, was presented to Johanna Lunn’s FORGIVENESS: STORIES FOR OUR TIME (Canada, 56 min), a powerful and personal exploration of anger, grief and the process of forgiveness through four people whose lives have been ripped apart by murder and terrorism. Other finalists in the Best Mid-Length Documentary category included Johanna Straub, Sandra Kulbach, Michaela Schaeuble and Nan Mellinger’s MOTHERS - 4 PIECES (Germany, 58 min) and Sonja Linden’s NO MAN IS AN ISLAND (Finland, 40 min).

The Best Short Documentary Award, for films up to 29 minutes in length, was presented to Arturo Cabanas’ MAN UP (USA, 11 min), a shocking snapshot of a father who, through

belittlement and punishment, is attempting to raise his son to be a soldier. Other finalists in the Best Short Documentary category included Mark Craig’s TALK TO ME (US, 23 min) and Kees van der Geest’s SHIT AND CHICKS (Netherlands, 10 min).

The Don Haig Award, an annual prize awarded to an emerging Canadian director whose work has bridged the documentary and fiction filmmaking worlds, was presented to Toronto-based filmmaker Hubert Davis, whose work includes the Academy Award nominated short documentary HARDWOOD and the fiction film ARUBA. The $10,000 cash prize, presented in memory of Don Haig, the much beloved ‘godfather of Canadian cinema’ who gave generously of his time and resources to support emerging directors, can be used for whatever the recipient needs towards his/her craft.

The inaugural Lindalee Tracey Award, founded in memory of the creative, socially-engaged documentary director, and awarded to an emerging Canadian filmmaker who works in the spirit of Lindalee – with passion, humour, a strong sense of social justice and a personal point of view – was presented to Edmonton-based Trevor Anderson whose work includes the short films RUGBURN and ROCK POCKETS. Accompanying the Lindalee Tracey Award is a $5000 cash prize.

Also at the ceremony, the Hot Docs Board of Directors presented acclaimed Dutch director Heddy Honigmann with the annual Outstanding Achievement Award. As part of the honour, Honigmann’s work is being featured in a retrospective programme during the Festival. She will also be a special guest in the final Hot Docs Talks panel, The Art of the Interview, on Saturday, April 28 from 1:00pm – 2:30pm.

Finally, in addition to the above awards, prizes associated with Rendezvous, Hot Docs’ service which arranges for one-on-one pitch meetings between producers with projects in development and commissioning editors, were also announced. The OMNI Prize for Best Third Language/Ethno-Cultural Pitch, which grants $10,000 in development money via the OMNI Diversity Television Independent Producers Fund, was awarded to 1001 PERFORMANCES, pitched by Josh Miller of Panacea Entertainment. The CBC Newsworld Camera Prize, which provides a $10,000 camera rental package for the best pitch received by the CBC, was awarded to SOUNDS LIKE A REVOLUTION, pitched by Summer Preney of Deltatime Productions. The NBC News Archive Prize for the best pitch at Rendezvous, which awards $2000 worth of rights for footage licensed by NBC News Archives, was awarded to GRANNY POWER, pitched by Isabelle Couture of Les Films de L’Isle.

The Hot Docs Audience Award, which is given to the film with the highest rating based on audience ballot, and the CIDA Award, a $5000 cash prize awarded to a filmmaker for the best

Canadian film on an international development issue, will be announced on Monday, April 30

The Hot Docs Festival Juries are:

Canadian Feature Documentary

Mark Achbar, Claas Danielsen, Ibtisam Mara’ana

International Feature Documentary

Judith Helfand, Eugene Jarecki, Amir Labaki

Short and Mid-Length Documentary

Simon Houpt, Ivana Milosevic, Alexandre Trudeau

The Don Haig Award Jury are:

Joan Schafer (Chair), Michael McNamara, Louise Lore, Brigitte Berman

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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