Nov 24, 2020
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CRTC may deny CTV,CHUM deal

TORONTO – The CRTC’s announcement today that it will deny CTV Inc., the right to buy five CityTV stations in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary and Toronto, as part of its billion-dollar proposal to acquire CHUM Ltd., is a step in the right direction.

ACTRA National President, Richard Hardacre said, "Keeping more broadcasters in the system means more windows for Canadian shows. So this is somewhat positive, however, is it enough to indicate that the CRTC is moving in the right direction to save Canadian drama – and has the CTVgm/CHUM decision shown that the CRTC is listening to the persistent argument of Canadian actors, writers, directors, and producers?"

In its submission to the CRTC, ACTRA asked that CTVgm not be able to dominate in concentrated markets, and it seems the CRTC was listening. However, National Executive Director, Stephen Waddell says, "The CRTC still must require private broadcasters to make a substantial investment in Canadian programming and make room for it in primetime. There is no real ‘diversity of voices’ without this stipulation."

The CRTC cannot lag on its decision to address the need for private broadcasters to spend at least 7% of their advertising revenue on new Canadian English-language dramas and schedule a minimum of two hours of these dramas in real primetime (Sunday to Thursday, 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.). ACTRA demands that the CRTC reinstate drama content regulations on the private broadcasters before Canadian culture completely fades to black.

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Headline, Industry News

CRTC may deny CTV,CHUM deal

TORONTO – The CRTC’s announcement today that it will deny CTV Inc., the right to buy five CityTV stations in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary and Toronto, as part of its billion-dollar proposal to acquire CHUM Ltd., is a step in the right direction.

ACTRA National President, Richard Hardacre said, "Keeping more broadcasters in the system means more windows for Canadian shows. So this is somewhat positive, however, is it enough to indicate that the CRTC is moving in the right direction to save Canadian drama – and has the CTVgm/CHUM decision shown that the CRTC is listening to the persistent argument of Canadian actors, writers, directors, and producers?"

In its submission to the CRTC, ACTRA asked that CTVgm not be able to dominate in concentrated markets, and it seems the CRTC was listening. However, National Executive Director, Stephen Waddell says, "The CRTC still must require private broadcasters to make a substantial investment in Canadian programming and make room for it in primetime. There is no real ‘diversity of voices’ without this stipulation."

The CRTC cannot lag on its decision to address the need for private broadcasters to spend at least 7% of their advertising revenue on new Canadian English-language dramas and schedule a minimum of two hours of these dramas in real primetime (Sunday to Thursday, 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.). ACTRA demands that the CRTC reinstate drama content regulations on the private broadcasters before Canadian culture completely fades to black.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

CRTC may deny CTV,CHUM deal

TORONTO – The CRTC’s announcement today that it will deny CTV Inc., the right to buy five CityTV stations in Vancouver, Winnipeg, Edmonton, Calgary and Toronto, as part of its billion-dollar proposal to acquire CHUM Ltd., is a step in the right direction.

ACTRA National President, Richard Hardacre said, "Keeping more broadcasters in the system means more windows for Canadian shows. So this is somewhat positive, however, is it enough to indicate that the CRTC is moving in the right direction to save Canadian drama – and has the CTVgm/CHUM decision shown that the CRTC is listening to the persistent argument of Canadian actors, writers, directors, and producers?"

In its submission to the CRTC, ACTRA asked that CTVgm not be able to dominate in concentrated markets, and it seems the CRTC was listening. However, National Executive Director, Stephen Waddell says, "The CRTC still must require private broadcasters to make a substantial investment in Canadian programming and make room for it in primetime. There is no real ‘diversity of voices’ without this stipulation."

The CRTC cannot lag on its decision to address the need for private broadcasters to spend at least 7% of their advertising revenue on new Canadian English-language dramas and schedule a minimum of two hours of these dramas in real primetime (Sunday to Thursday, 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.). ACTRA demands that the CRTC reinstate drama content regulations on the private broadcasters before Canadian culture completely fades to black.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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