Nov 25, 2020
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CBC’s Test the nation’s language skills

Ever wondered what ur teens r tlkg about? Need a transl8tr? Canadians will have an opportunity to decipher teen speak, and a chance to test their linguistic wits—Canadian style—when TEST THE NATION: WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE telecasts Sunday, Sept. 9 at 8 p.m. on CBC Television. Wendy Mesley (Marketplace) and Brent Bambury (Go) are back to host the second edition of the series, a two-hour interactive quiz show about how we use—and abuse—the English language, with a unique Canadian twist.

There’s no doubt about it—Canadians have their own highly distinctive form of the English language. In fact, Canadian English is so unique we even have our own edition of the Oxford Dictionary. But, how well do we actually know Canadian English? Can the average person tell a metaphor from a spoonerism? What about regional expressions?

The show will also challenge common beliefs about language aptitude. Will participants who watch 16 to 20 hours a week of television outwit the bookworms? We know that girls often start talking before boys, but which sex will prevail in TEST THE NATION: WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE?

In the studio, seven teams—a total of 240 people from every province and territory—will be tested on their word wisdom. The teams are word gamers, ad writers, English teachers, fraternities and sororities, comedians, romance novelists and celebrities. The celebrity team includes Cathy Jones, Sheila McCarthy, Kim Stockwood, Patrick McKenna, Sook-Yin Lee, Russell Smith and Andrew Coyne. In addition, 10 high schools from across the country will battle it out: Lester B. Pearson High School, Alta.; Rick Hansen Secondary School, B.C.; Shaftsbury High School, Man.; Harbour View High School, N.B.; Gander Collegiate, Nfld.; Halifax West High, N.S.; Gananoque Secondary School, Ont.; Morell Regional High School, P.E.I.; Philemon Wright High School, Que.; and Walter Murray Collegiate, Sask.

Studio contestants and viewers at home will be asked 70 questions in seven categories: Spelling Eh?, Language Terms, Made In Canada, Teen Speak, Everyday Mistakes, The Arts, What the …? and Word Origins. At the end of the show, the results will be averaged and each group’s overall score will be announced as well as the highest individual score.

“More than 1.5 million Canadians loved the interactive element of Test the Nation: IQ, and 200,000 played online,” said Kirstine Layfield, executive director, network programming, CBC Television. “We’re confident that viewers will be entertained when they sit back and take the language test with their families.”

Viewers can play along live by logging onto http://www.cbc.ca/testthenation/, with pen and paper or with the official scorecard provided by Quaker in the Sept. 8 edition of the National Post and available for download on the website.

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Headline, Industry News

CBC’s Test the nation’s language skills

Ever wondered what ur teens r tlkg about? Need a transl8tr? Canadians will have an opportunity to decipher teen speak, and a chance to test their linguistic wits—Canadian style—when TEST THE NATION: WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE telecasts Sunday, Sept. 9 at 8 p.m. on CBC Television. Wendy Mesley (Marketplace) and Brent Bambury (Go) are back to host the second edition of the series, a two-hour interactive quiz show about how we use—and abuse—the English language, with a unique Canadian twist.

There’s no doubt about it—Canadians have their own highly distinctive form of the English language. In fact, Canadian English is so unique we even have our own edition of the Oxford Dictionary. But, how well do we actually know Canadian English? Can the average person tell a metaphor from a spoonerism? What about regional expressions?

The show will also challenge common beliefs about language aptitude. Will participants who watch 16 to 20 hours a week of television outwit the bookworms? We know that girls often start talking before boys, but which sex will prevail in TEST THE NATION: WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE?

In the studio, seven teams—a total of 240 people from every province and territory—will be tested on their word wisdom. The teams are word gamers, ad writers, English teachers, fraternities and sororities, comedians, romance novelists and celebrities. The celebrity team includes Cathy Jones, Sheila McCarthy, Kim Stockwood, Patrick McKenna, Sook-Yin Lee, Russell Smith and Andrew Coyne. In addition, 10 high schools from across the country will battle it out: Lester B. Pearson High School, Alta.; Rick Hansen Secondary School, B.C.; Shaftsbury High School, Man.; Harbour View High School, N.B.; Gander Collegiate, Nfld.; Halifax West High, N.S.; Gananoque Secondary School, Ont.; Morell Regional High School, P.E.I.; Philemon Wright High School, Que.; and Walter Murray Collegiate, Sask.

Studio contestants and viewers at home will be asked 70 questions in seven categories: Spelling Eh?, Language Terms, Made In Canada, Teen Speak, Everyday Mistakes, The Arts, What the …? and Word Origins. At the end of the show, the results will be averaged and each group’s overall score will be announced as well as the highest individual score.

“More than 1.5 million Canadians loved the interactive element of Test the Nation: IQ, and 200,000 played online,” said Kirstine Layfield, executive director, network programming, CBC Television. “We’re confident that viewers will be entertained when they sit back and take the language test with their families.”

Viewers can play along live by logging onto http://www.cbc.ca/testthenation/, with pen and paper or with the official scorecard provided by Quaker in the Sept. 8 edition of the National Post and available for download on the website.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

CBC’s Test the nation’s language skills

Ever wondered what ur teens r tlkg about? Need a transl8tr? Canadians will have an opportunity to decipher teen speak, and a chance to test their linguistic wits—Canadian style—when TEST THE NATION: WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE telecasts Sunday, Sept. 9 at 8 p.m. on CBC Television. Wendy Mesley (Marketplace) and Brent Bambury (Go) are back to host the second edition of the series, a two-hour interactive quiz show about how we use—and abuse—the English language, with a unique Canadian twist.

There’s no doubt about it—Canadians have their own highly distinctive form of the English language. In fact, Canadian English is so unique we even have our own edition of the Oxford Dictionary. But, how well do we actually know Canadian English? Can the average person tell a metaphor from a spoonerism? What about regional expressions?

The show will also challenge common beliefs about language aptitude. Will participants who watch 16 to 20 hours a week of television outwit the bookworms? We know that girls often start talking before boys, but which sex will prevail in TEST THE NATION: WATCH YOUR LANGUAGE?

In the studio, seven teams—a total of 240 people from every province and territory—will be tested on their word wisdom. The teams are word gamers, ad writers, English teachers, fraternities and sororities, comedians, romance novelists and celebrities. The celebrity team includes Cathy Jones, Sheila McCarthy, Kim Stockwood, Patrick McKenna, Sook-Yin Lee, Russell Smith and Andrew Coyne. In addition, 10 high schools from across the country will battle it out: Lester B. Pearson High School, Alta.; Rick Hansen Secondary School, B.C.; Shaftsbury High School, Man.; Harbour View High School, N.B.; Gander Collegiate, Nfld.; Halifax West High, N.S.; Gananoque Secondary School, Ont.; Morell Regional High School, P.E.I.; Philemon Wright High School, Que.; and Walter Murray Collegiate, Sask.

Studio contestants and viewers at home will be asked 70 questions in seven categories: Spelling Eh?, Language Terms, Made In Canada, Teen Speak, Everyday Mistakes, The Arts, What the …? and Word Origins. At the end of the show, the results will be averaged and each group’s overall score will be announced as well as the highest individual score.

“More than 1.5 million Canadians loved the interactive element of Test the Nation: IQ, and 200,000 played online,” said Kirstine Layfield, executive director, network programming, CBC Television. “We’re confident that viewers will be entertained when they sit back and take the language test with their families.”

Viewers can play along live by logging onto http://www.cbc.ca/testthenation/, with pen and paper or with the official scorecard provided by Quaker in the Sept. 8 edition of the National Post and available for download on the website.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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