Dec 04, 2020
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Can. actor found dead still a mystery

TORONTO (CP) _ By all accounts, Jacob Adams was in good health and got along fabulously with the dogs he was hired to care for at the West Los Angeles home of actor Ving Rhames.

That made it all the more shocking for friends and family when they learned the Canadian screenwriter and aspiring actor had been found dead at the home on Aug. 3, his chest, arms and legs covered in blood and dog bites.

Now the Los Angeles coroner’s office says it will take up to seven more weeks before toxicology results hopefully show what happened in the hours before his body was discovered by police.

Adams, 40, befriended the "Mission: Impossible" co-star on the Toronto set of the made-for-TV movie "Kojak." The two hit it off and Adams was soon hired to look after Rhames’s dogs at his family’s home in Brentwood, Calif.

"Ving Rhames seemed to take Jacob under his wing . . . he just kind of adopted him," said friend and fellow Toronto actor Ros Feldman.

Police initially said the death was caused by mauling, though an autopsy found neither "superficial" dog bites nor a heart attack were to blame. Police have since suggested the dogs _ three hulking mastiffs and an English bulldog _ may have sensed Adams was in trouble and tried to pull him toward the house.

What sort of trouble remains far from clear. The coroner’s office will only say the cause of death is "deferred."

"The biggest thing for us all right now is we still don’t know what the cause of death is," Adams’ brother, Howard Adams, told the Toronto Star.

"All we know at this point is that the dog bites weren’t sufficient to cause the death. But there is no apparent or obvious cause of death."

Craig Harvey, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office, said it takes about six to eight weeks to run the hundreds of necessary toxicology tests for drugs and poisons, which need to be verified and often repeated.

"It’s not just a simple thing of pouring fluid A into beaker B and reading the results: there’s a lot of science going on there," Harvey said.

Adams was born in Jamaica and came to Canada in 1979 after he was adopted by a Canadian family.

The 1991 "Sharon, Lois and Bram Christmas Special" was the actor’s first break, leading to roles in TV shows like "Babylon" and "Earth: Final Conflict." He also did some stunt work and wrote the soon to be released "Animal 2," which features Rhames in the lead role.

He had been living on Rhames’ property for two years.

Adams was adored on set for his easygoing attitude and sense of humour, said Feldman, who has worked with him on a variety of projects.

"The last time I spoke to him he was just over the moon, laughing and joking," she said. "He had no airs and graces, which is so nice in our business."

On Monday, Rhames issued a statement calling Adams "a dear friend" and offering condolences to the screenwriter’s family. He was out of the country filming a movie at the time of the incident.

In a 2001 interview with Time magazine, the actor said he tries his characters on his pets because they "know when something’s not right."

"I figure if I can fool them, then I’ve successfully changed my spirit."

For example, while preparing for the role of Don King in a televised movie, Rhames adopted the famous promoter’s speech patterns, mannerisms and movement _ and then tested it on his dogs.

"The dogs started growling at me," he said. "That’s a true story."

It’s possible another autopsy could be performed on Adams’ body in Canada, though that would depend on the wishes of the family, Ontario Chief Coroner Dr. Barry McLellan said in an interview.

"It’s based on the circumstances, but we do have legislative authority to conduct further investigation here, including an autopsy," he said.

A memorial service is scheduled for Saturday in Mississauga, Ont., west of Toronto.

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Headline, Industry News

Can. actor found dead still a mystery

TORONTO (CP) _ By all accounts, Jacob Adams was in good health and got along fabulously with the dogs he was hired to care for at the West Los Angeles home of actor Ving Rhames.

That made it all the more shocking for friends and family when they learned the Canadian screenwriter and aspiring actor had been found dead at the home on Aug. 3, his chest, arms and legs covered in blood and dog bites.

Now the Los Angeles coroner’s office says it will take up to seven more weeks before toxicology results hopefully show what happened in the hours before his body was discovered by police.

Adams, 40, befriended the "Mission: Impossible" co-star on the Toronto set of the made-for-TV movie "Kojak." The two hit it off and Adams was soon hired to look after Rhames’s dogs at his family’s home in Brentwood, Calif.

"Ving Rhames seemed to take Jacob under his wing . . . he just kind of adopted him," said friend and fellow Toronto actor Ros Feldman.

Police initially said the death was caused by mauling, though an autopsy found neither "superficial" dog bites nor a heart attack were to blame. Police have since suggested the dogs _ three hulking mastiffs and an English bulldog _ may have sensed Adams was in trouble and tried to pull him toward the house.

What sort of trouble remains far from clear. The coroner’s office will only say the cause of death is "deferred."

"The biggest thing for us all right now is we still don’t know what the cause of death is," Adams’ brother, Howard Adams, told the Toronto Star.

"All we know at this point is that the dog bites weren’t sufficient to cause the death. But there is no apparent or obvious cause of death."

Craig Harvey, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office, said it takes about six to eight weeks to run the hundreds of necessary toxicology tests for drugs and poisons, which need to be verified and often repeated.

"It’s not just a simple thing of pouring fluid A into beaker B and reading the results: there’s a lot of science going on there," Harvey said.

Adams was born in Jamaica and came to Canada in 1979 after he was adopted by a Canadian family.

The 1991 "Sharon, Lois and Bram Christmas Special" was the actor’s first break, leading to roles in TV shows like "Babylon" and "Earth: Final Conflict." He also did some stunt work and wrote the soon to be released "Animal 2," which features Rhames in the lead role.

He had been living on Rhames’ property for two years.

Adams was adored on set for his easygoing attitude and sense of humour, said Feldman, who has worked with him on a variety of projects.

"The last time I spoke to him he was just over the moon, laughing and joking," she said. "He had no airs and graces, which is so nice in our business."

On Monday, Rhames issued a statement calling Adams "a dear friend" and offering condolences to the screenwriter’s family. He was out of the country filming a movie at the time of the incident.

In a 2001 interview with Time magazine, the actor said he tries his characters on his pets because they "know when something’s not right."

"I figure if I can fool them, then I’ve successfully changed my spirit."

For example, while preparing for the role of Don King in a televised movie, Rhames adopted the famous promoter’s speech patterns, mannerisms and movement _ and then tested it on his dogs.

"The dogs started growling at me," he said. "That’s a true story."

It’s possible another autopsy could be performed on Adams’ body in Canada, though that would depend on the wishes of the family, Ontario Chief Coroner Dr. Barry McLellan said in an interview.

"It’s based on the circumstances, but we do have legislative authority to conduct further investigation here, including an autopsy," he said.

A memorial service is scheduled for Saturday in Mississauga, Ont., west of Toronto.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

Can. actor found dead still a mystery

TORONTO (CP) _ By all accounts, Jacob Adams was in good health and got along fabulously with the dogs he was hired to care for at the West Los Angeles home of actor Ving Rhames.

That made it all the more shocking for friends and family when they learned the Canadian screenwriter and aspiring actor had been found dead at the home on Aug. 3, his chest, arms and legs covered in blood and dog bites.

Now the Los Angeles coroner’s office says it will take up to seven more weeks before toxicology results hopefully show what happened in the hours before his body was discovered by police.

Adams, 40, befriended the "Mission: Impossible" co-star on the Toronto set of the made-for-TV movie "Kojak." The two hit it off and Adams was soon hired to look after Rhames’s dogs at his family’s home in Brentwood, Calif.

"Ving Rhames seemed to take Jacob under his wing . . . he just kind of adopted him," said friend and fellow Toronto actor Ros Feldman.

Police initially said the death was caused by mauling, though an autopsy found neither "superficial" dog bites nor a heart attack were to blame. Police have since suggested the dogs _ three hulking mastiffs and an English bulldog _ may have sensed Adams was in trouble and tried to pull him toward the house.

What sort of trouble remains far from clear. The coroner’s office will only say the cause of death is "deferred."

"The biggest thing for us all right now is we still don’t know what the cause of death is," Adams’ brother, Howard Adams, told the Toronto Star.

"All we know at this point is that the dog bites weren’t sufficient to cause the death. But there is no apparent or obvious cause of death."

Craig Harvey, a spokesman for the Los Angeles County Coroner’s Office, said it takes about six to eight weeks to run the hundreds of necessary toxicology tests for drugs and poisons, which need to be verified and often repeated.

"It’s not just a simple thing of pouring fluid A into beaker B and reading the results: there’s a lot of science going on there," Harvey said.

Adams was born in Jamaica and came to Canada in 1979 after he was adopted by a Canadian family.

The 1991 "Sharon, Lois and Bram Christmas Special" was the actor’s first break, leading to roles in TV shows like "Babylon" and "Earth: Final Conflict." He also did some stunt work and wrote the soon to be released "Animal 2," which features Rhames in the lead role.

He had been living on Rhames’ property for two years.

Adams was adored on set for his easygoing attitude and sense of humour, said Feldman, who has worked with him on a variety of projects.

"The last time I spoke to him he was just over the moon, laughing and joking," she said. "He had no airs and graces, which is so nice in our business."

On Monday, Rhames issued a statement calling Adams "a dear friend" and offering condolences to the screenwriter’s family. He was out of the country filming a movie at the time of the incident.

In a 2001 interview with Time magazine, the actor said he tries his characters on his pets because they "know when something’s not right."

"I figure if I can fool them, then I’ve successfully changed my spirit."

For example, while preparing for the role of Don King in a televised movie, Rhames adopted the famous promoter’s speech patterns, mannerisms and movement _ and then tested it on his dogs.

"The dogs started growling at me," he said. "That’s a true story."

It’s possible another autopsy could be performed on Adams’ body in Canada, though that would depend on the wishes of the family, Ontario Chief Coroner Dr. Barry McLellan said in an interview.

"It’s based on the circumstances, but we do have legislative authority to conduct further investigation here, including an autopsy," he said.

A memorial service is scheduled for Saturday in Mississauga, Ont., west of Toronto.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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