Nov 29, 2020
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ACTRA challenges broadcasters to put more Canada on TV

Canadian stars and hundreds of ACTRA members and supporters told Canada’s private broadcasters to put more Canada on TV.

ACTRA’s demonstration outside the Canadian Association of Broadcasters’ convention in Ottawa included well-known Canadian stars Eric Peterson (Corner Gas), Julie Stewart (Cold Squad), Robb Wells (Trailer Park Boys), John Paul Tremblay (Trailer Park Boys), ACTRA’s National President Richard Hardacre and ACTRA Toronto President Karl Pruner.

"Those people call themselves Canadian broadcasters. I say that’s a name you have to earn, and you don’t earn it by producing zero one-hour dramatic shows and signing over Canada’s primetime to a different country," said Peterson.

"Last year, Canada’s English-language broadcasters spent almost $500 million in Hollywood and a grand total of $40 million on Canadian dramas. For every dollar they spend on drama in Canada, they spent 12 dollars in Hollywood. It’s time for more Canada on Canadian TV," said Stewart.

"Become real Canadian broadcasters. Produce real Canadian shows, and show them on TV when Canadians are watching," said Wells.

"The people of Canada deserve to see themselves and their own stories on their own airwaves," said Tremblay.

"We’re here today to tell broadcasters, the CRTC and Canadians that we need more Canadian drama on TV. If we don’t speak up, we stand to lose our airwaves to Hollywood. Our culture and our country are too important to stay silent. It’s time for action by the CRTC and by the broadcasters," said Hardacre.

ACTRA has been calling for regulations requiring Canada’s private broadcasters to spend at least 7% of their advertising revenues on new Canadian English-language drama programming and to schedule at least two hours more of Canadian dramas in real primetime (Sunday to Thursday, 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.)

<font size=1>Source: ACTRA public relations</font>

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Headline, Industry News

ACTRA challenges broadcasters to put more Canada on TV

Canadian stars and hundreds of ACTRA members and supporters told Canada’s private broadcasters to put more Canada on TV.

ACTRA’s demonstration outside the Canadian Association of Broadcasters’ convention in Ottawa included well-known Canadian stars Eric Peterson (Corner Gas), Julie Stewart (Cold Squad), Robb Wells (Trailer Park Boys), John Paul Tremblay (Trailer Park Boys), ACTRA’s National President Richard Hardacre and ACTRA Toronto President Karl Pruner.

"Those people call themselves Canadian broadcasters. I say that’s a name you have to earn, and you don’t earn it by producing zero one-hour dramatic shows and signing over Canada’s primetime to a different country," said Peterson.

"Last year, Canada’s English-language broadcasters spent almost $500 million in Hollywood and a grand total of $40 million on Canadian dramas. For every dollar they spend on drama in Canada, they spent 12 dollars in Hollywood. It’s time for more Canada on Canadian TV," said Stewart.

"Become real Canadian broadcasters. Produce real Canadian shows, and show them on TV when Canadians are watching," said Wells.

"The people of Canada deserve to see themselves and their own stories on their own airwaves," said Tremblay.

"We’re here today to tell broadcasters, the CRTC and Canadians that we need more Canadian drama on TV. If we don’t speak up, we stand to lose our airwaves to Hollywood. Our culture and our country are too important to stay silent. It’s time for action by the CRTC and by the broadcasters," said Hardacre.

ACTRA has been calling for regulations requiring Canada’s private broadcasters to spend at least 7% of their advertising revenues on new Canadian English-language drama programming and to schedule at least two hours more of Canadian dramas in real primetime (Sunday to Thursday, 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.)

<font size=1>Source: ACTRA public relations</font>

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

ACTRA challenges broadcasters to put more Canada on TV

Canadian stars and hundreds of ACTRA members and supporters told Canada’s private broadcasters to put more Canada on TV.

ACTRA’s demonstration outside the Canadian Association of Broadcasters’ convention in Ottawa included well-known Canadian stars Eric Peterson (Corner Gas), Julie Stewart (Cold Squad), Robb Wells (Trailer Park Boys), John Paul Tremblay (Trailer Park Boys), ACTRA’s National President Richard Hardacre and ACTRA Toronto President Karl Pruner.

"Those people call themselves Canadian broadcasters. I say that’s a name you have to earn, and you don’t earn it by producing zero one-hour dramatic shows and signing over Canada’s primetime to a different country," said Peterson.

"Last year, Canada’s English-language broadcasters spent almost $500 million in Hollywood and a grand total of $40 million on Canadian dramas. For every dollar they spend on drama in Canada, they spent 12 dollars in Hollywood. It’s time for more Canada on Canadian TV," said Stewart.

"Become real Canadian broadcasters. Produce real Canadian shows, and show them on TV when Canadians are watching," said Wells.

"The people of Canada deserve to see themselves and their own stories on their own airwaves," said Tremblay.

"We’re here today to tell broadcasters, the CRTC and Canadians that we need more Canadian drama on TV. If we don’t speak up, we stand to lose our airwaves to Hollywood. Our culture and our country are too important to stay silent. It’s time for action by the CRTC and by the broadcasters," said Hardacre.

ACTRA has been calling for regulations requiring Canada’s private broadcasters to spend at least 7% of their advertising revenues on new Canadian English-language drama programming and to schedule at least two hours more of Canadian dramas in real primetime (Sunday to Thursday, 7:00 p.m. to 11:00 p.m.)

<font size=1>Source: ACTRA public relations</font>

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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