Dec 04, 2020
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Dusty Cohl, man behind Toronto film festival, dies

Dusty Cohl, a legendary "accomplice" who made things happen in film circles around the world, died yesterday at Sunnybrook Hospital after a year-long battle with cancer. He was 78.

A monumental icon in Canada’s film and entertainment industry, Cohl was a founder of the Toronto International Film Festival, which began in 1976, as well as one of the driving forces behind Canada’s Walk of Fame that was created in 1998. His devotion to Canadian talent and this country’s film industry had him invested as a member of the Order of Canada in 2003.

Born near Bloor and Bathurst Sts. on Feb. 21, 1929, Murray Cohl (who picked up the nickname "Dusty" at a Bolshevik Jewish camp north of the city where he spent his summers as a youth) was known for his big smile, charming demeanour, quick wit, keen intellect and unique style and ideas – all valuable traits for a man whose strength was said to be putting people together.

Later in life, he became synonymous with his black Stetson cowboy hat, adorned in shiny pins, and a grizzled beard, both of which he was rarely without.

Between 1954 and the mid-70s, Cohl made a name for himself as a real estate lawyer, making deals in both North York and Florida.

A spontaneous visit to Cannes, France, in 1960 – by chance when that city’s film festival was on – changed not only Cohl’s life, but arguably the movie industry forever.

It was there that Cohl fell in love with movies.

The first Toronto Festival of Festivals, a non-competitive event, was announced at the Cannes festival in 1976 by Cohl and Bill Marshall. It was renamed the Toronto International Film Festival in 1994.

Cohl is survived by his wife of 56 years, Joan, three children and six grandchildren.

There will be a private funeral for close friends and family.

A public memorial will follow at a later date.

<font size=1>Source: Jam! Showbiz Canada</font>

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Headline, Industry News

Dusty Cohl, man behind Toronto film festival, dies

Dusty Cohl, a legendary "accomplice" who made things happen in film circles around the world, died yesterday at Sunnybrook Hospital after a year-long battle with cancer. He was 78.

A monumental icon in Canada’s film and entertainment industry, Cohl was a founder of the Toronto International Film Festival, which began in 1976, as well as one of the driving forces behind Canada’s Walk of Fame that was created in 1998. His devotion to Canadian talent and this country’s film industry had him invested as a member of the Order of Canada in 2003.

Born near Bloor and Bathurst Sts. on Feb. 21, 1929, Murray Cohl (who picked up the nickname "Dusty" at a Bolshevik Jewish camp north of the city where he spent his summers as a youth) was known for his big smile, charming demeanour, quick wit, keen intellect and unique style and ideas – all valuable traits for a man whose strength was said to be putting people together.

Later in life, he became synonymous with his black Stetson cowboy hat, adorned in shiny pins, and a grizzled beard, both of which he was rarely without.

Between 1954 and the mid-70s, Cohl made a name for himself as a real estate lawyer, making deals in both North York and Florida.

A spontaneous visit to Cannes, France, in 1960 – by chance when that city’s film festival was on – changed not only Cohl’s life, but arguably the movie industry forever.

It was there that Cohl fell in love with movies.

The first Toronto Festival of Festivals, a non-competitive event, was announced at the Cannes festival in 1976 by Cohl and Bill Marshall. It was renamed the Toronto International Film Festival in 1994.

Cohl is survived by his wife of 56 years, Joan, three children and six grandchildren.

There will be a private funeral for close friends and family.

A public memorial will follow at a later date.

<font size=1>Source: Jam! Showbiz Canada</font>

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

Dusty Cohl, man behind Toronto film festival, dies

Dusty Cohl, a legendary "accomplice" who made things happen in film circles around the world, died yesterday at Sunnybrook Hospital after a year-long battle with cancer. He was 78.

A monumental icon in Canada’s film and entertainment industry, Cohl was a founder of the Toronto International Film Festival, which began in 1976, as well as one of the driving forces behind Canada’s Walk of Fame that was created in 1998. His devotion to Canadian talent and this country’s film industry had him invested as a member of the Order of Canada in 2003.

Born near Bloor and Bathurst Sts. on Feb. 21, 1929, Murray Cohl (who picked up the nickname "Dusty" at a Bolshevik Jewish camp north of the city where he spent his summers as a youth) was known for his big smile, charming demeanour, quick wit, keen intellect and unique style and ideas – all valuable traits for a man whose strength was said to be putting people together.

Later in life, he became synonymous with his black Stetson cowboy hat, adorned in shiny pins, and a grizzled beard, both of which he was rarely without.

Between 1954 and the mid-70s, Cohl made a name for himself as a real estate lawyer, making deals in both North York and Florida.

A spontaneous visit to Cannes, France, in 1960 – by chance when that city’s film festival was on – changed not only Cohl’s life, but arguably the movie industry forever.

It was there that Cohl fell in love with movies.

The first Toronto Festival of Festivals, a non-competitive event, was announced at the Cannes festival in 1976 by Cohl and Bill Marshall. It was renamed the Toronto International Film Festival in 1994.

Cohl is survived by his wife of 56 years, Joan, three children and six grandchildren.

There will be a private funeral for close friends and family.

A public memorial will follow at a later date.

<font size=1>Source: Jam! Showbiz Canada</font>

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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