Dec 01, 2020
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Headline, Technology News

Taking 4K to the Streets: a success and a reality

By Alex Alcoba

TORONTO, ON – 4K is the wave of the future, and it’s here. This past weekend, Toronto was host to “Taking 4K to the Streets,” a two-day event designed to illustrate the vast potential of 4K technology.

“4K is equal to 4 times 1080HD,” said David Woods, one of the event’s coordinators.  “If you’re shooting a car commercial . . . and you get that beautiful scenic shot at magic hour, you might not have time to get that second shot. But if you shoot in 4K, you can jump in 4 times and you still have a full resolution picture. You haven’t lost any resolution when you’re going to standard HD quality.” 

Though the current production standard is 2K, 4K projectors are being installed in theatres across the continent so the technology is rapidly becoming widely available.

A creation of D.J. Woods Productions, Post DNA Productions, Ryerson University and the Toronto Final Cut Users group, "Taking 4K to the Streets" showcased a variety of presentations ranging from a screening of Peter Jackson’s RED One 4K shot short film <em>Crossing the Line</em> to workflow demonstrations for Scratch, Cine4K, Clipster 4K and Final Cut Pro.

On day one, discussions arose about the Ari 4K scanner to 35mm print with input from producer Ken Davis and Director of Photography D. Gregor Hagey about working with the RED 4K camera. The day also held a fascinating discussion about the near instantaneous 4K transfer network from CineGrid.

The final day of the seminar saw a series of hands on demonstrations of 4K cameras and 4K workflows followed by a panel discussion about the future of 4K technology. 

“I think it went very well,” said Diane Woods, another of the event’s coordinators, when asked about the event’s success. “I’d say we had about 300 people attend. There was a lot of good information and a lot of people really were amazed.”

The event was host to a variety of industry professionals. Beyond DOPs and camera operators, 1st camera assistants, 2nd camera assistants, producers, directors, post production houses, and even production service providers were in attendance.

“They all took back quite a bit,” Diane Woods said. “I think people were not aware that it can be done now and it can be done effectively.”

So where does all this lead? How realistic is a practical usage of 4K technology?

“4K just gives the world – especially the commercial world – just so much more power to achieve more flexibility, and faster, tighter budget shoots,” David Woods said. “It just gives them so much more capability, and it’s really not going to be any more expensive than shooting in their normal 35mm or video world.”

With the success of this past weekend’s seminar, D.J. Woods Productions is looking into putting on another 4K event in the fall, this time with greater emphasis on panel discussions.

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Headline, Technology News

Taking 4K to the Streets: a success and a reality

By Alex Alcoba

TORONTO, ON – 4K is the wave of the future, and it’s here. This past weekend, Toronto was host to “Taking 4K to the Streets,” a two-day event designed to illustrate the vast potential of 4K technology.

“4K is equal to 4 times 1080HD,” said David Woods, one of the event’s coordinators.  “If you’re shooting a car commercial . . . and you get that beautiful scenic shot at magic hour, you might not have time to get that second shot. But if you shoot in 4K, you can jump in 4 times and you still have a full resolution picture. You haven’t lost any resolution when you’re going to standard HD quality.” 

Though the current production standard is 2K, 4K projectors are being installed in theatres across the continent so the technology is rapidly becoming widely available.

A creation of D.J. Woods Productions, Post DNA Productions, Ryerson University and the Toronto Final Cut Users group, "Taking 4K to the Streets" showcased a variety of presentations ranging from a screening of Peter Jackson’s RED One 4K shot short film <em>Crossing the Line</em> to workflow demonstrations for Scratch, Cine4K, Clipster 4K and Final Cut Pro.

On day one, discussions arose about the Ari 4K scanner to 35mm print with input from producer Ken Davis and Director of Photography D. Gregor Hagey about working with the RED 4K camera. The day also held a fascinating discussion about the near instantaneous 4K transfer network from CineGrid.

The final day of the seminar saw a series of hands on demonstrations of 4K cameras and 4K workflows followed by a panel discussion about the future of 4K technology. 

“I think it went very well,” said Diane Woods, another of the event’s coordinators, when asked about the event’s success. “I’d say we had about 300 people attend. There was a lot of good information and a lot of people really were amazed.”

The event was host to a variety of industry professionals. Beyond DOPs and camera operators, 1st camera assistants, 2nd camera assistants, producers, directors, post production houses, and even production service providers were in attendance.

“They all took back quite a bit,” Diane Woods said. “I think people were not aware that it can be done now and it can be done effectively.”

So where does all this lead? How realistic is a practical usage of 4K technology?

“4K just gives the world – especially the commercial world – just so much more power to achieve more flexibility, and faster, tighter budget shoots,” David Woods said. “It just gives them so much more capability, and it’s really not going to be any more expensive than shooting in their normal 35mm or video world.”

With the success of this past weekend’s seminar, D.J. Woods Productions is looking into putting on another 4K event in the fall, this time with greater emphasis on panel discussions.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Technology News

Taking 4K to the Streets: a success and a reality

By Alex Alcoba

TORONTO, ON – 4K is the wave of the future, and it’s here. This past weekend, Toronto was host to “Taking 4K to the Streets,” a two-day event designed to illustrate the vast potential of 4K technology.

“4K is equal to 4 times 1080HD,” said David Woods, one of the event’s coordinators.  “If you’re shooting a car commercial . . . and you get that beautiful scenic shot at magic hour, you might not have time to get that second shot. But if you shoot in 4K, you can jump in 4 times and you still have a full resolution picture. You haven’t lost any resolution when you’re going to standard HD quality.” 

Though the current production standard is 2K, 4K projectors are being installed in theatres across the continent so the technology is rapidly becoming widely available.

A creation of D.J. Woods Productions, Post DNA Productions, Ryerson University and the Toronto Final Cut Users group, "Taking 4K to the Streets" showcased a variety of presentations ranging from a screening of Peter Jackson’s RED One 4K shot short film <em>Crossing the Line</em> to workflow demonstrations for Scratch, Cine4K, Clipster 4K and Final Cut Pro.

On day one, discussions arose about the Ari 4K scanner to 35mm print with input from producer Ken Davis and Director of Photography D. Gregor Hagey about working with the RED 4K camera. The day also held a fascinating discussion about the near instantaneous 4K transfer network from CineGrid.

The final day of the seminar saw a series of hands on demonstrations of 4K cameras and 4K workflows followed by a panel discussion about the future of 4K technology. 

“I think it went very well,” said Diane Woods, another of the event’s coordinators, when asked about the event’s success. “I’d say we had about 300 people attend. There was a lot of good information and a lot of people really were amazed.”

The event was host to a variety of industry professionals. Beyond DOPs and camera operators, 1st camera assistants, 2nd camera assistants, producers, directors, post production houses, and even production service providers were in attendance.

“They all took back quite a bit,” Diane Woods said. “I think people were not aware that it can be done now and it can be done effectively.”

So where does all this lead? How realistic is a practical usage of 4K technology?

“4K just gives the world – especially the commercial world – just so much more power to achieve more flexibility, and faster, tighter budget shoots,” David Woods said. “It just gives them so much more capability, and it’s really not going to be any more expensive than shooting in their normal 35mm or video world.”

With the success of this past weekend’s seminar, D.J. Woods Productions is looking into putting on another 4K event in the fall, this time with greater emphasis on panel discussions.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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