Dec 04, 2020
Visit our sister site:

Headline, Industry News

DGA ratifies deal

The Directors Guild of America gave its final seal of approval Wednesday to a new work agreement with Hollywood studios and producers, a contract that will guarantee filmmakers a share of residuals for work streamed over the Internet.

The union did not release information on how many of its 13,500 members voted to ratify the new contract, but the DGA said it represented a solid majority.

“The vote reflects the strong support and enthusiasm our members have for our new contract,” said DGA President Michael Apted. “We won important gains such as higher wages, higher residual bases, significant improvements in basic cable, a more secure health plan and solutions to problems affecting our ADs [assistant directors] and UPMs [unit production managers].”

The DGA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers began negotiations in earnest in early January, after the AMPTP broke off talks with the Writers Guild of America, whose members went on strike Nov. 5.

While the AMPTP and the WGA remained at an impasse for nearly three months, talks between producers and directors went relatively smoothly, and the two sides settled on a new contract in a quick five days.

Those terms laid the groundwork for the subsequent pact with the writers and helped end the 100-day walkout on Feb. 12, but not before costing the economy of Los Angeles a whopping $2.5 billion, according to a report issued Wednesday by the L.A. County Economic Development Corp.

“Our negotiations with DGA proved beyond any doubt that when both parties are prepared to bargain seriously, groundbreaking new media labor pacts can be reached without resorting to harmful and unnecessary strikes,” AMPTP said in a statement.

After some tête-à-tête at the bargaining table, the directors won some vital concessions regarding how they’re paid royalties for content in the digital age.

Perhaps the most important, producers recognized directors’ jurisdictional rights when it comes to new media, enabling the DGA a voice in future negotiations as business models evolve and the Internet becomes a larger revenue source. Directors also doubled residuals paid for TV and movie downloads to 0.7 percent and 0.65 percent respectively once a certain number of downloads are reached.

Additionally, the contract mandates that studios hire union members for shows costing higher than $15,000 per minute, or $300,000 per program.

The DGA’s governing board recommended the deal to union members on Jan. 27. The new contract begins July 1, one day after the Screen Actors Guild’s current contract with producers is set to expire.

That union is also seeking favorable terms along the lines of the WGA and DGA deals, but some of its highest-profile members, such as Tom Hanks, George Clooney and Meryl Streep, are urging their fellow actors to avoid another costly work stoppage.

Informal negotiations are expected to get underway as early as March.

Source: E! Online

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

DGA ratifies deal

The Directors Guild of America gave its final seal of approval Wednesday to a new work agreement with Hollywood studios and producers, a contract that will guarantee filmmakers a share of residuals for work streamed over the Internet.

The union did not release information on how many of its 13,500 members voted to ratify the new contract, but the DGA said it represented a solid majority.

“The vote reflects the strong support and enthusiasm our members have for our new contract,” said DGA President Michael Apted. “We won important gains such as higher wages, higher residual bases, significant improvements in basic cable, a more secure health plan and solutions to problems affecting our ADs [assistant directors] and UPMs [unit production managers].”

The DGA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers began negotiations in earnest in early January, after the AMPTP broke off talks with the Writers Guild of America, whose members went on strike Nov. 5.

While the AMPTP and the WGA remained at an impasse for nearly three months, talks between producers and directors went relatively smoothly, and the two sides settled on a new contract in a quick five days.

Those terms laid the groundwork for the subsequent pact with the writers and helped end the 100-day walkout on Feb. 12, but not before costing the economy of Los Angeles a whopping $2.5 billion, according to a report issued Wednesday by the L.A. County Economic Development Corp.

“Our negotiations with DGA proved beyond any doubt that when both parties are prepared to bargain seriously, groundbreaking new media labor pacts can be reached without resorting to harmful and unnecessary strikes,” AMPTP said in a statement.

After some tête-à-tête at the bargaining table, the directors won some vital concessions regarding how they’re paid royalties for content in the digital age.

Perhaps the most important, producers recognized directors’ jurisdictional rights when it comes to new media, enabling the DGA a voice in future negotiations as business models evolve and the Internet becomes a larger revenue source. Directors also doubled residuals paid for TV and movie downloads to 0.7 percent and 0.65 percent respectively once a certain number of downloads are reached.

Additionally, the contract mandates that studios hire union members for shows costing higher than $15,000 per minute, or $300,000 per program.

The DGA’s governing board recommended the deal to union members on Jan. 27. The new contract begins July 1, one day after the Screen Actors Guild’s current contract with producers is set to expire.

That union is also seeking favorable terms along the lines of the WGA and DGA deals, but some of its highest-profile members, such as Tom Hanks, George Clooney and Meryl Streep, are urging their fellow actors to avoid another costly work stoppage.

Informal negotiations are expected to get underway as early as March.

Source: E! Online

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

DGA ratifies deal

The Directors Guild of America gave its final seal of approval Wednesday to a new work agreement with Hollywood studios and producers, a contract that will guarantee filmmakers a share of residuals for work streamed over the Internet.

The union did not release information on how many of its 13,500 members voted to ratify the new contract, but the DGA said it represented a solid majority.

“The vote reflects the strong support and enthusiasm our members have for our new contract,” said DGA President Michael Apted. “We won important gains such as higher wages, higher residual bases, significant improvements in basic cable, a more secure health plan and solutions to problems affecting our ADs [assistant directors] and UPMs [unit production managers].”

The DGA and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers began negotiations in earnest in early January, after the AMPTP broke off talks with the Writers Guild of America, whose members went on strike Nov. 5.

While the AMPTP and the WGA remained at an impasse for nearly three months, talks between producers and directors went relatively smoothly, and the two sides settled on a new contract in a quick five days.

Those terms laid the groundwork for the subsequent pact with the writers and helped end the 100-day walkout on Feb. 12, but not before costing the economy of Los Angeles a whopping $2.5 billion, according to a report issued Wednesday by the L.A. County Economic Development Corp.

“Our negotiations with DGA proved beyond any doubt that when both parties are prepared to bargain seriously, groundbreaking new media labor pacts can be reached without resorting to harmful and unnecessary strikes,” AMPTP said in a statement.

After some tête-à-tête at the bargaining table, the directors won some vital concessions regarding how they’re paid royalties for content in the digital age.

Perhaps the most important, producers recognized directors’ jurisdictional rights when it comes to new media, enabling the DGA a voice in future negotiations as business models evolve and the Internet becomes a larger revenue source. Directors also doubled residuals paid for TV and movie downloads to 0.7 percent and 0.65 percent respectively once a certain number of downloads are reached.

Additionally, the contract mandates that studios hire union members for shows costing higher than $15,000 per minute, or $300,000 per program.

The DGA’s governing board recommended the deal to union members on Jan. 27. The new contract begins July 1, one day after the Screen Actors Guild’s current contract with producers is set to expire.

That union is also seeking favorable terms along the lines of the WGA and DGA deals, but some of its highest-profile members, such as Tom Hanks, George Clooney and Meryl Streep, are urging their fellow actors to avoid another costly work stoppage.

Informal negotiations are expected to get underway as early as March.

Source: E! Online

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisements