Nov 28, 2020
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Producers to help draft guidelines, minister says

OTTAWA — The Canadian Heritage Minister says she would wait a full year to wield new powers to deny film and television producers tax credits if their works do not jibe with taxpayer sensibilities – should those powers be granted to her.

And during that time, Josée Verner told the Senate banking committee yesterday, she would allow members of the entertainment industry to draft guidelines to establish what would not qualify for the credits, and how those guidelines should be applied.

Film producers and actors alike say they fear a provision tucked away in an omnibus tax bill before the Senate committee will be used to cut off tax benefits for productions that contain graphic sex and violence or other content the government finds offensive.

In fact, Ms. Verner made clear yesterday, that is exactly what is intended.

Allowing the Canadian film and television production industry to lead the development of the guidelines, Ms. Verner said, “reasserts the principle that there is audiovisual material which may not be illegal but which taxpayers should simply not be expected to pay for.”

Under the current rules, the government is required to extend tax credits to any production that meets a required number of qualifications from a list that includes such things as a Canadian director, a Canadian producer and a Canadian principal star.

The government wants to be able to disqualify content that is illegal under the Criminal Code, such as child pornography and hate crimes, “as well as other types of content” which the public finds unacceptable, Ms. Verner said.

“Some in the film and television industry are worried that this provision is tantamount to censorship. This is absolutely not the case; it is simply a matter of responsibility and integrity. Producers will remain free to finance their projects without public funding.”

Liberal senators pounced on the proposed legislation, some suggesting that its inclusion in a 500-page tax bill was an attempt to avoid transparency.

Source: Globe and Mail

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Headline, Industry News

Producers to help draft guidelines, minister says

OTTAWA — The Canadian Heritage Minister says she would wait a full year to wield new powers to deny film and television producers tax credits if their works do not jibe with taxpayer sensibilities – should those powers be granted to her.

And during that time, Josée Verner told the Senate banking committee yesterday, she would allow members of the entertainment industry to draft guidelines to establish what would not qualify for the credits, and how those guidelines should be applied.

Film producers and actors alike say they fear a provision tucked away in an omnibus tax bill before the Senate committee will be used to cut off tax benefits for productions that contain graphic sex and violence or other content the government finds offensive.

In fact, Ms. Verner made clear yesterday, that is exactly what is intended.

Allowing the Canadian film and television production industry to lead the development of the guidelines, Ms. Verner said, “reasserts the principle that there is audiovisual material which may not be illegal but which taxpayers should simply not be expected to pay for.”

Under the current rules, the government is required to extend tax credits to any production that meets a required number of qualifications from a list that includes such things as a Canadian director, a Canadian producer and a Canadian principal star.

The government wants to be able to disqualify content that is illegal under the Criminal Code, such as child pornography and hate crimes, “as well as other types of content” which the public finds unacceptable, Ms. Verner said.

“Some in the film and television industry are worried that this provision is tantamount to censorship. This is absolutely not the case; it is simply a matter of responsibility and integrity. Producers will remain free to finance their projects without public funding.”

Liberal senators pounced on the proposed legislation, some suggesting that its inclusion in a 500-page tax bill was an attempt to avoid transparency.

Source: Globe and Mail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

Producers to help draft guidelines, minister says

OTTAWA — The Canadian Heritage Minister says she would wait a full year to wield new powers to deny film and television producers tax credits if their works do not jibe with taxpayer sensibilities – should those powers be granted to her.

And during that time, Josée Verner told the Senate banking committee yesterday, she would allow members of the entertainment industry to draft guidelines to establish what would not qualify for the credits, and how those guidelines should be applied.

Film producers and actors alike say they fear a provision tucked away in an omnibus tax bill before the Senate committee will be used to cut off tax benefits for productions that contain graphic sex and violence or other content the government finds offensive.

In fact, Ms. Verner made clear yesterday, that is exactly what is intended.

Allowing the Canadian film and television production industry to lead the development of the guidelines, Ms. Verner said, “reasserts the principle that there is audiovisual material which may not be illegal but which taxpayers should simply not be expected to pay for.”

Under the current rules, the government is required to extend tax credits to any production that meets a required number of qualifications from a list that includes such things as a Canadian director, a Canadian producer and a Canadian principal star.

The government wants to be able to disqualify content that is illegal under the Criminal Code, such as child pornography and hate crimes, “as well as other types of content” which the public finds unacceptable, Ms. Verner said.

“Some in the film and television industry are worried that this provision is tantamount to censorship. This is absolutely not the case; it is simply a matter of responsibility and integrity. Producers will remain free to finance their projects without public funding.”

Liberal senators pounced on the proposed legislation, some suggesting that its inclusion in a 500-page tax bill was an attempt to avoid transparency.

Source: Globe and Mail

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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