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Broadcast rules should ensure that independent channels have a voice, S-VOX tells CRTC

GATINEAU, QC, April 22 /CNW/ – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) should maintain the rules and regulations that enable small and independent broadcasters to provide niche programming
for under-served audiences at affordable prices, Toronto-based multimedia company S-VOX told a public hearing on the future of the broadcasting system.

S-VOX President and CEO Bill Roberts warned against allowing the pursuit of mass-market success to destroy the spirit of the Broadcasting Act, which is designed to ensure that all Canadians have access to programming from a plurality of voices reflecting this country’s unique character and diversity.

S-VOX, which operates the multi-faith and multicultural specialty television service VisionTV, was invited to make a presentation to the CRTC’s ongoing review of the regulatory frameworks for broadcast distribution undertakings (BDUs) and specialty television services.

“In a cultural industry such as television, of significance in the daily lives of so many of this country’s citizens, mass appeal cannot be the sole measure of success,” Mr. Roberts told the Commission. “Excellence in Canadian television must also be about social responsibility and reflection of the positive values that hold our social construct together.”

Mr. Roberts said that in the digital distribution regime proposed by the cable and satellite industry, small and independent specialty channels such as VisionTV “will have no assured carriage or guaranteed access on terms that permit sustainability – unless we are prepared to morph into more mass-appeal services, propelled by market forces.”

A “rush to the middle” will result, he said, which will not serve to advance the principles of the Broadcasting Act.

S-VOX is part of a group of independent specialty services that appeared yesterday before the Commission.

Mr. Roberts said S-VOX supports the recommendations made by the independent services group. These recommendations include basic carriage for independent services at a minimum regulated wholesale rate, continued access to distribution, and maintaining genre exclusivity for Canadian specialty services.

Said Mr. Roberts: “It is the responsibility of the regulator to ensure a plurality of voices within the new digital universe, for services such as VisionTV, which is uniquely positioned to reflect faith-based communities in a spirit of diversity and accommodation. Without regulation, many such channels that reach under-served audiences will be paved over.”

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Headline, Industry News

Broadcast rules should ensure that independent channels have a voice, S-VOX tells CRTC

GATINEAU, QC, April 22 /CNW/ – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) should maintain the rules and regulations that enable small and independent broadcasters to provide niche programming
for under-served audiences at affordable prices, Toronto-based multimedia company S-VOX told a public hearing on the future of the broadcasting system.

S-VOX President and CEO Bill Roberts warned against allowing the pursuit of mass-market success to destroy the spirit of the Broadcasting Act, which is designed to ensure that all Canadians have access to programming from a plurality of voices reflecting this country’s unique character and diversity.

S-VOX, which operates the multi-faith and multicultural specialty television service VisionTV, was invited to make a presentation to the CRTC’s ongoing review of the regulatory frameworks for broadcast distribution undertakings (BDUs) and specialty television services.

“In a cultural industry such as television, of significance in the daily lives of so many of this country’s citizens, mass appeal cannot be the sole measure of success,” Mr. Roberts told the Commission. “Excellence in Canadian television must also be about social responsibility and reflection of the positive values that hold our social construct together.”

Mr. Roberts said that in the digital distribution regime proposed by the cable and satellite industry, small and independent specialty channels such as VisionTV “will have no assured carriage or guaranteed access on terms that permit sustainability – unless we are prepared to morph into more mass-appeal services, propelled by market forces.”

A “rush to the middle” will result, he said, which will not serve to advance the principles of the Broadcasting Act.

S-VOX is part of a group of independent specialty services that appeared yesterday before the Commission.

Mr. Roberts said S-VOX supports the recommendations made by the independent services group. These recommendations include basic carriage for independent services at a minimum regulated wholesale rate, continued access to distribution, and maintaining genre exclusivity for Canadian specialty services.

Said Mr. Roberts: “It is the responsibility of the regulator to ensure a plurality of voices within the new digital universe, for services such as VisionTV, which is uniquely positioned to reflect faith-based communities in a spirit of diversity and accommodation. Without regulation, many such channels that reach under-served audiences will be paved over.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

Broadcast rules should ensure that independent channels have a voice, S-VOX tells CRTC

GATINEAU, QC, April 22 /CNW/ – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) should maintain the rules and regulations that enable small and independent broadcasters to provide niche programming
for under-served audiences at affordable prices, Toronto-based multimedia company S-VOX told a public hearing on the future of the broadcasting system.

S-VOX President and CEO Bill Roberts warned against allowing the pursuit of mass-market success to destroy the spirit of the Broadcasting Act, which is designed to ensure that all Canadians have access to programming from a plurality of voices reflecting this country’s unique character and diversity.

S-VOX, which operates the multi-faith and multicultural specialty television service VisionTV, was invited to make a presentation to the CRTC’s ongoing review of the regulatory frameworks for broadcast distribution undertakings (BDUs) and specialty television services.

“In a cultural industry such as television, of significance in the daily lives of so many of this country’s citizens, mass appeal cannot be the sole measure of success,” Mr. Roberts told the Commission. “Excellence in Canadian television must also be about social responsibility and reflection of the positive values that hold our social construct together.”

Mr. Roberts said that in the digital distribution regime proposed by the cable and satellite industry, small and independent specialty channels such as VisionTV “will have no assured carriage or guaranteed access on terms that permit sustainability – unless we are prepared to morph into more mass-appeal services, propelled by market forces.”

A “rush to the middle” will result, he said, which will not serve to advance the principles of the Broadcasting Act.

S-VOX is part of a group of independent specialty services that appeared yesterday before the Commission.

Mr. Roberts said S-VOX supports the recommendations made by the independent services group. These recommendations include basic carriage for independent services at a minimum regulated wholesale rate, continued access to distribution, and maintaining genre exclusivity for Canadian specialty services.

Said Mr. Roberts: “It is the responsibility of the regulator to ensure a plurality of voices within the new digital universe, for services such as VisionTV, which is uniquely positioned to reflect faith-based communities in a spirit of diversity and accommodation. Without regulation, many such channels that reach under-served audiences will be paved over.”

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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