Nov 28, 2020
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CRTC to launch wide-ranging consultations on new media environment

OTTAWA (CP) – The CRTC has launched a major review of the impact the Internet is having on Canadian broadcasting and whether it should try to govern content on new digital media.

The federal regulator is in the midst of its most comprehensive review of national television policy in 15 years, and has heard complaints from broadcasters and cable-TV operators that they are losing market share to the Internet and other new-media platforms such as cellphones.

On Thursday, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission issued a 75-page compilation of stakeholder views as a starting point to what it said would be a wide-ranging review.
“New digital technologies and platforms are creating opportunities for the broadcast of professionally produced Canadian content that simply didn’t exist a few years ago,” CRTC chairman Konrad von Finckenstein said in a release.

“Our intention is not to regulate new media, but rather to gain a better understanding of this environment and, if necessary, to propose measures that would support the continued achievement of the Broadcasting Act’s objectives.”

Still, the document notes that the commission exempted the Internet from Canadian-content requirements in 1999 and that times have changed.

High-speed residential Internet access is now available to 93 per cent of Canadian households and has been adopted by more than 60 per cent. As well, Canadians are spending more time accessing broadcasting content over the Internet and on mobile devices.

“Accordingly, the commission now considers it appropriate to review new media and, if necessary, revise the exemption orders,” the document states. “Fundamentally, it is necessary to determine if the new media broadcasting environment is contributing sufficiently to the achievement of the broadcasting policy objectives of the Act, and if it will continue to do so.”

Interested parties have until July 11 to file comments, and the regulator plans to hold public hearings in early 2009.

Source: The Canadian Press

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Headline, Technology News

CRTC to launch wide-ranging consultations on new media environment

OTTAWA (CP) – The CRTC has launched a major review of the impact the Internet is having on Canadian broadcasting and whether it should try to govern content on new digital media.

The federal regulator is in the midst of its most comprehensive review of national television policy in 15 years, and has heard complaints from broadcasters and cable-TV operators that they are losing market share to the Internet and other new-media platforms such as cellphones.

On Thursday, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission issued a 75-page compilation of stakeholder views as a starting point to what it said would be a wide-ranging review.
“New digital technologies and platforms are creating opportunities for the broadcast of professionally produced Canadian content that simply didn’t exist a few years ago,” CRTC chairman Konrad von Finckenstein said in a release.

“Our intention is not to regulate new media, but rather to gain a better understanding of this environment and, if necessary, to propose measures that would support the continued achievement of the Broadcasting Act’s objectives.”

Still, the document notes that the commission exempted the Internet from Canadian-content requirements in 1999 and that times have changed.

High-speed residential Internet access is now available to 93 per cent of Canadian households and has been adopted by more than 60 per cent. As well, Canadians are spending more time accessing broadcasting content over the Internet and on mobile devices.

“Accordingly, the commission now considers it appropriate to review new media and, if necessary, revise the exemption orders,” the document states. “Fundamentally, it is necessary to determine if the new media broadcasting environment is contributing sufficiently to the achievement of the broadcasting policy objectives of the Act, and if it will continue to do so.”

Interested parties have until July 11 to file comments, and the regulator plans to hold public hearings in early 2009.

Source: The Canadian Press

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Technology News

CRTC to launch wide-ranging consultations on new media environment

OTTAWA (CP) – The CRTC has launched a major review of the impact the Internet is having on Canadian broadcasting and whether it should try to govern content on new digital media.

The federal regulator is in the midst of its most comprehensive review of national television policy in 15 years, and has heard complaints from broadcasters and cable-TV operators that they are losing market share to the Internet and other new-media platforms such as cellphones.

On Thursday, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission issued a 75-page compilation of stakeholder views as a starting point to what it said would be a wide-ranging review.
“New digital technologies and platforms are creating opportunities for the broadcast of professionally produced Canadian content that simply didn’t exist a few years ago,” CRTC chairman Konrad von Finckenstein said in a release.

“Our intention is not to regulate new media, but rather to gain a better understanding of this environment and, if necessary, to propose measures that would support the continued achievement of the Broadcasting Act’s objectives.”

Still, the document notes that the commission exempted the Internet from Canadian-content requirements in 1999 and that times have changed.

High-speed residential Internet access is now available to 93 per cent of Canadian households and has been adopted by more than 60 per cent. As well, Canadians are spending more time accessing broadcasting content over the Internet and on mobile devices.

“Accordingly, the commission now considers it appropriate to review new media and, if necessary, revise the exemption orders,” the document states. “Fundamentally, it is necessary to determine if the new media broadcasting environment is contributing sufficiently to the achievement of the broadcasting policy objectives of the Act, and if it will continue to do so.”

Interested parties have until July 11 to file comments, and the regulator plans to hold public hearings in early 2009.

Source: The Canadian Press

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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