Dec 01, 2020
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CRTC submits report on the Canadian Television Fund

OTTAWA-GATINEAU – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) submitted a report on the Canadian Television Fund (CTF) to the Minister of Canadian Heritage. The report contains 11 recommendations relating to the CTF’s mandate and governance structure.

“It is our hope that the recommendations we have put forward will assist in resolving the issues surrounding the CTF. The Fund plays a vital role in fostering a strong domestic television industry through its support of independent productions. Its effective operation is vital to the creation of high-quality, Canadian-made programs,” said Konrad von Finckenstein, Q.C., Chairman of the CRTC.

In February 2008, the Minister of Canadian Heritage announced that the government had asked the CRTC to prepare a report and make recommendations on the Canadian Television Fund, in accordance with section 15 of the Broadcasting Act.

This request followed a public hearing on the CTF held by the Commission from February 4 to 8, 2008, at which interested parties expressed their views. The Commission had previously created a Task Force to provide a detailed analysis of the issues concerning the funding of Canadian programming and the CTF’s governance.

Key recommendations in the CRTC report include:

  • The CTF’s funding be split into private- and public-sector streams. The private-sector stream would support the production of commercially successful programming and be accessed by private commercial broadcasters. The public-sector stream would be set aside for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, educational broadcasters and other not-for-profit broadcasters.
  • Two separate Boards of Directors be established, with one having oversight of the private-sector funding stream and the other being responsible for the public-sector funding stream. However, both streams should share the day-to-day administrative services of the CTF to reduce operating costs.
  • Increased emphasis be placed on audience success as a criterion for access to the new private-sector funding stream.
  • The CTF maintain its current practice of funding productions that score 10 out of 10 points on the scale developed by the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (the CAVCO scale).
  • The proposals by two companies that distribute broadcasting services to opt out of their contributions to the CTF, as required by the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations, be rejected.
  • The CTF establish a new funding stream to support the production of Canadian programs for broadcast on new media platforms.

Actions by the CRTC:

While the majority of the report’s recommendations require action by the CTF Board and other government entities, the Commission is able to act in certain areas. Among other things, the Commission will amend:

  • its policy to allow tangible benefits stemming from ownership transactions in the broadcasting industry to be directed to the CTF, and
  • the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations to make mandatory the monthly contributions of companies that distribute broadcasting services, once the Department of Canadian Heritage has resolved the major issues.

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Headline, Industry News

CRTC submits report on the Canadian Television Fund

OTTAWA-GATINEAU – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) submitted a report on the Canadian Television Fund (CTF) to the Minister of Canadian Heritage. The report contains 11 recommendations relating to the CTF’s mandate and governance structure.

“It is our hope that the recommendations we have put forward will assist in resolving the issues surrounding the CTF. The Fund plays a vital role in fostering a strong domestic television industry through its support of independent productions. Its effective operation is vital to the creation of high-quality, Canadian-made programs,” said Konrad von Finckenstein, Q.C., Chairman of the CRTC.

In February 2008, the Minister of Canadian Heritage announced that the government had asked the CRTC to prepare a report and make recommendations on the Canadian Television Fund, in accordance with section 15 of the Broadcasting Act.

This request followed a public hearing on the CTF held by the Commission from February 4 to 8, 2008, at which interested parties expressed their views. The Commission had previously created a Task Force to provide a detailed analysis of the issues concerning the funding of Canadian programming and the CTF’s governance.

Key recommendations in the CRTC report include:

  • The CTF’s funding be split into private- and public-sector streams. The private-sector stream would support the production of commercially successful programming and be accessed by private commercial broadcasters. The public-sector stream would be set aside for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, educational broadcasters and other not-for-profit broadcasters.
  • Two separate Boards of Directors be established, with one having oversight of the private-sector funding stream and the other being responsible for the public-sector funding stream. However, both streams should share the day-to-day administrative services of the CTF to reduce operating costs.
  • Increased emphasis be placed on audience success as a criterion for access to the new private-sector funding stream.
  • The CTF maintain its current practice of funding productions that score 10 out of 10 points on the scale developed by the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (the CAVCO scale).
  • The proposals by two companies that distribute broadcasting services to opt out of their contributions to the CTF, as required by the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations, be rejected.
  • The CTF establish a new funding stream to support the production of Canadian programs for broadcast on new media platforms.

Actions by the CRTC:

While the majority of the report’s recommendations require action by the CTF Board and other government entities, the Commission is able to act in certain areas. Among other things, the Commission will amend:

  • its policy to allow tangible benefits stemming from ownership transactions in the broadcasting industry to be directed to the CTF, and
  • the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations to make mandatory the monthly contributions of companies that distribute broadcasting services, once the Department of Canadian Heritage has resolved the major issues.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

CRTC submits report on the Canadian Television Fund

OTTAWA-GATINEAU – The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) submitted a report on the Canadian Television Fund (CTF) to the Minister of Canadian Heritage. The report contains 11 recommendations relating to the CTF’s mandate and governance structure.

“It is our hope that the recommendations we have put forward will assist in resolving the issues surrounding the CTF. The Fund plays a vital role in fostering a strong domestic television industry through its support of independent productions. Its effective operation is vital to the creation of high-quality, Canadian-made programs,” said Konrad von Finckenstein, Q.C., Chairman of the CRTC.

In February 2008, the Minister of Canadian Heritage announced that the government had asked the CRTC to prepare a report and make recommendations on the Canadian Television Fund, in accordance with section 15 of the Broadcasting Act.

This request followed a public hearing on the CTF held by the Commission from February 4 to 8, 2008, at which interested parties expressed their views. The Commission had previously created a Task Force to provide a detailed analysis of the issues concerning the funding of Canadian programming and the CTF’s governance.

Key recommendations in the CRTC report include:

  • The CTF’s funding be split into private- and public-sector streams. The private-sector stream would support the production of commercially successful programming and be accessed by private commercial broadcasters. The public-sector stream would be set aside for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, educational broadcasters and other not-for-profit broadcasters.
  • Two separate Boards of Directors be established, with one having oversight of the private-sector funding stream and the other being responsible for the public-sector funding stream. However, both streams should share the day-to-day administrative services of the CTF to reduce operating costs.
  • Increased emphasis be placed on audience success as a criterion for access to the new private-sector funding stream.
  • The CTF maintain its current practice of funding productions that score 10 out of 10 points on the scale developed by the Canadian Audio-Visual Certification Office (the CAVCO scale).
  • The proposals by two companies that distribute broadcasting services to opt out of their contributions to the CTF, as required by the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations, be rejected.
  • The CTF establish a new funding stream to support the production of Canadian programs for broadcast on new media platforms.

Actions by the CRTC:

While the majority of the report’s recommendations require action by the CTF Board and other government entities, the Commission is able to act in certain areas. Among other things, the Commission will amend:

  • its policy to allow tangible benefits stemming from ownership transactions in the broadcasting industry to be directed to the CTF, and
  • the Broadcasting Distribution Regulations to make mandatory the monthly contributions of companies that distribute broadcasting services, once the Department of Canadian Heritage has resolved the major issues.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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