Nov 30, 2020
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‘Slumdog’ tops Oscars

“Slumdog Millionaire,” a rags-to-riches tale both on screen and off, was named best picture at the 81st Annual Academy Awards. The indie movie that fought an uphill battle to worldwide recognition took home eight awards, including best director honors for filmmaker Danny Boyle.

Accepting the award, surrounded by the movie’s cast and crew, many of whom had flown in from India for the awards, producer Christian Colson said, “together we have been on an extraordinary journey.” Noting that the film had no stars, he cited a script that engendered “mad love” and a “genius” director for its success. “Most of all we had passion and we had belief and if you have those things, anything is possible.”

Senn Penn earned his second Oscar as best actor for his performance as gay activist Harvey Milk in the biopic “Milk.”

Sean Penn earned his second Oscar as best actor at the 81st Annual Academy Awards for his performance as gay activist Harvey Milk in the biopic “Milk.”

“You commie-loving sons of guns,” Penn joked as he stepped to the podium. “I did not expect this, and I wanted to be very clear that I know how hard I make it to appreciate me often, but I am touched by this appreciation.

Turning serious, he thanked the film’s creators, including director Gus Van Sant, before issuing a fierce call for “equal rights for everyone,” praise for the country for electing “an elegant man president” and a special word of appreciation for fellow nominee Mickey Rourke, saying, “he is my brother.”

Kate Winslet, on her sixth nomination, finally copped an Oscar, winning the trophy for best actress.

Her performance as a German woman harboring lethal secrets in “The Reader” finally brought her the moment that she admitted she’d been dreaming of ever since she was a young girl practicing an acceptance speech in front of the bathroom mirror. “This would have been a shampoo bottle,” she said, hoisting her statuette. “Well, it’s not a shampoo bottle now.”

“Slumdog” earned Danny Boyle the best director prize.

Accepting the award, the British director, who found the film of his career in the streets of Mumbai, could only marvel, “You’ve been so generous to us this evening.” Thanking the people of Mumbai as he hoisted his statuette, he said, “You dwarf even this guy, thank you so much indeed.

Adding an emotional coda to a career that was cut down in its prime, the Academy saluted the late Heath Ledger as best supporting actor.

His posthumous award for “The Dark Knight” was accepted by his father, mother and sister.

“This award tonight would have humbly validated Heath’s quiet determination to be truly accepted by your here, his peers, in an industry he so loved,” his father, Kim, said.

His mother, Sally Bell, added, “Tonight we are choosing to celebrate and be happy for what he has achieved,” while his sister completed the thought by saying, “we proudly accept this award on behalf of your beautiful (daughter) Matilda.”

Ledger, who died of an accidental overdose on Jan. 22, 2008, became only the second performer to win an Oscar posthumously, following in the steps of Peter Finch, who was posthumously named best actor more than 30 years ago for his performance in 1976’s “Network.”

Penelope Cruz took home the first Oscar of the evening as the 81st Annual Academy Awards got under way Sunday night at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland.

Winning the best supporting actress prize for her performance as a Latin spitfire in “Vicki Cristina Barcelona,” Cruz wondered: “Has anybody ever fainted here, because I might be the first one.” Thanking her director, Woody Allen, “for trusting me with this beautiful character,” she dedicated the award to her parents, brothers and sisters, and her friend, the late publicity executive Robert Garlock.

Pixar’s “WALL-E,” directed by Andrew Stanton, was named best animated feature. Accepting the trophy, Stanton said: “It’s been such an inspiration to spend time with a character who so tenaciously struggles to see beauty in everything he sees.” He also revealed one of the movie’s inspirations by thanking his high school drama teacher for years ago casting him in a production of “Hello, Dolly.”

He was followed to the stage by Japanese animator Kurio Kato, whose “La Maison en Petits Cubes” was named best animated short film.

The Oscar for original screenplay went to Dustin Lance Black for “Milk.” Black delivered an emotional acceptance, recounting how learning of gay activist Harvey Milk had given him hope as a teenager that “I could live my life openly as who I am and one day I could fall in love and even get married.” Turning to young gay and lesbian viewers watching the broadcast, he said: “You are beautiful, wonderful creatures of value, and no matter what anyone tells you, God does love you.”

“Slumdog Millionaire” earned Simon Beaufoy the adapted screenplay award for his adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel. “I never would be standing here tonight without Vikras,” he said.

“Slumdog” began to develop further momentum as Anthony Dod Mantle won the prize for cinematography. “Danny, it starts with you,” he hailed the film’s director Danny Boyle.

“Slumdog” brought back-to-back Oscars for composer A.R. Rahman, recepient of the gold for best score and best song, the upbeat “Jai Ho,” which serves as the movie’s infectious finale.

“All my life, I’ve had a choice of hate and love. I chose love and I’m here. God bless,” Rahman said in his second acceptance.

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” which begins and ends in New Orleans but also roams the world, claimed the honors for best art direction, with Donald Graham Burt and Victor J. Zolfo picking up the award.

Greg Cannom earned the third Oscar of his career, winning the best makeup award for “Button.”

The 18th century gowns on view in “The Dutchess” earned Michael O’Connor his first Oscar for costume design. He saluted his leading lady, saying, “Keira Knightley, you are one classy lady.”

After a tribute to action movies, Will Smith handed out a trio of awards in the postproduction field. “The Dark Knight” took the trophy for sound editing, while “Slumdog” picked up two back-to-back awards, for sound mixing and film editing.

Accepting the sound mixing award, “Slumdog’s” Result Pookutty said: “I dedicate this award to my country. This is not just a sound award. This is history being made.”

French tightrope artist Philippe Petit upstaged James Marsh and Simon Chinn, winners of the best documentary award for “Man on Wire,” which recounts Petit’s wire-walk between the twin towers of the World Trade Center. He punctuated his thanks by making a lucky coin, given to him by director Werner Herzog disappear and balancing the Oscar on his chin.

The prize for documentary short went to Megan Mylan for “Smile Pinki,” a film about an Indian girl who is successfully treated for a cleft lip.

The Japanese film “Departures,” the tale of an unemployed cellist who takes a job in a funeral home, directed by Yojiro Takita, pulled something of a minor upset in the foreign-language film category, where it was competing against such internationally known titles as Israel’s “Waltz With Bashir” and France’s “The Class.”

Spoofing traditional Oscar night opening numbers, host Hugh Jackman kicked off the show by offering his low-rent tribute to the nominated films — and even some that were left out of the best picture circle like “The Dark Knight” and “Iron Man” — winning the evening’s first standing ovation for his efforts.

He even enlisted a game Anne Hathaway, who sang the role of Richard Nixon to his David Frost as together they parodied “Frost/Nixon.”

Source: Hollywood Reporter

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Front Page, Industry News

‘Slumdog’ tops Oscars

“Slumdog Millionaire,” a rags-to-riches tale both on screen and off, was named best picture at the 81st Annual Academy Awards. The indie movie that fought an uphill battle to worldwide recognition took home eight awards, including best director honors for filmmaker Danny Boyle.

Accepting the award, surrounded by the movie’s cast and crew, many of whom had flown in from India for the awards, producer Christian Colson said, “together we have been on an extraordinary journey.” Noting that the film had no stars, he cited a script that engendered “mad love” and a “genius” director for its success. “Most of all we had passion and we had belief and if you have those things, anything is possible.”

Senn Penn earned his second Oscar as best actor for his performance as gay activist Harvey Milk in the biopic “Milk.”

Sean Penn earned his second Oscar as best actor at the 81st Annual Academy Awards for his performance as gay activist Harvey Milk in the biopic “Milk.”

“You commie-loving sons of guns,” Penn joked as he stepped to the podium. “I did not expect this, and I wanted to be very clear that I know how hard I make it to appreciate me often, but I am touched by this appreciation.

Turning serious, he thanked the film’s creators, including director Gus Van Sant, before issuing a fierce call for “equal rights for everyone,” praise for the country for electing “an elegant man president” and a special word of appreciation for fellow nominee Mickey Rourke, saying, “he is my brother.”

Kate Winslet, on her sixth nomination, finally copped an Oscar, winning the trophy for best actress.

Her performance as a German woman harboring lethal secrets in “The Reader” finally brought her the moment that she admitted she’d been dreaming of ever since she was a young girl practicing an acceptance speech in front of the bathroom mirror. “This would have been a shampoo bottle,” she said, hoisting her statuette. “Well, it’s not a shampoo bottle now.”

“Slumdog” earned Danny Boyle the best director prize.

Accepting the award, the British director, who found the film of his career in the streets of Mumbai, could only marvel, “You’ve been so generous to us this evening.” Thanking the people of Mumbai as he hoisted his statuette, he said, “You dwarf even this guy, thank you so much indeed.

Adding an emotional coda to a career that was cut down in its prime, the Academy saluted the late Heath Ledger as best supporting actor.

His posthumous award for “The Dark Knight” was accepted by his father, mother and sister.

“This award tonight would have humbly validated Heath’s quiet determination to be truly accepted by your here, his peers, in an industry he so loved,” his father, Kim, said.

His mother, Sally Bell, added, “Tonight we are choosing to celebrate and be happy for what he has achieved,” while his sister completed the thought by saying, “we proudly accept this award on behalf of your beautiful (daughter) Matilda.”

Ledger, who died of an accidental overdose on Jan. 22, 2008, became only the second performer to win an Oscar posthumously, following in the steps of Peter Finch, who was posthumously named best actor more than 30 years ago for his performance in 1976’s “Network.”

Penelope Cruz took home the first Oscar of the evening as the 81st Annual Academy Awards got under way Sunday night at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland.

Winning the best supporting actress prize for her performance as a Latin spitfire in “Vicki Cristina Barcelona,” Cruz wondered: “Has anybody ever fainted here, because I might be the first one.” Thanking her director, Woody Allen, “for trusting me with this beautiful character,” she dedicated the award to her parents, brothers and sisters, and her friend, the late publicity executive Robert Garlock.

Pixar’s “WALL-E,” directed by Andrew Stanton, was named best animated feature. Accepting the trophy, Stanton said: “It’s been such an inspiration to spend time with a character who so tenaciously struggles to see beauty in everything he sees.” He also revealed one of the movie’s inspirations by thanking his high school drama teacher for years ago casting him in a production of “Hello, Dolly.”

He was followed to the stage by Japanese animator Kurio Kato, whose “La Maison en Petits Cubes” was named best animated short film.

The Oscar for original screenplay went to Dustin Lance Black for “Milk.” Black delivered an emotional acceptance, recounting how learning of gay activist Harvey Milk had given him hope as a teenager that “I could live my life openly as who I am and one day I could fall in love and even get married.” Turning to young gay and lesbian viewers watching the broadcast, he said: “You are beautiful, wonderful creatures of value, and no matter what anyone tells you, God does love you.”

“Slumdog Millionaire” earned Simon Beaufoy the adapted screenplay award for his adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel. “I never would be standing here tonight without Vikras,” he said.

“Slumdog” began to develop further momentum as Anthony Dod Mantle won the prize for cinematography. “Danny, it starts with you,” he hailed the film’s director Danny Boyle.

“Slumdog” brought back-to-back Oscars for composer A.R. Rahman, recepient of the gold for best score and best song, the upbeat “Jai Ho,” which serves as the movie’s infectious finale.

“All my life, I’ve had a choice of hate and love. I chose love and I’m here. God bless,” Rahman said in his second acceptance.

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” which begins and ends in New Orleans but also roams the world, claimed the honors for best art direction, with Donald Graham Burt and Victor J. Zolfo picking up the award.

Greg Cannom earned the third Oscar of his career, winning the best makeup award for “Button.”

The 18th century gowns on view in “The Dutchess” earned Michael O’Connor his first Oscar for costume design. He saluted his leading lady, saying, “Keira Knightley, you are one classy lady.”

After a tribute to action movies, Will Smith handed out a trio of awards in the postproduction field. “The Dark Knight” took the trophy for sound editing, while “Slumdog” picked up two back-to-back awards, for sound mixing and film editing.

Accepting the sound mixing award, “Slumdog’s” Result Pookutty said: “I dedicate this award to my country. This is not just a sound award. This is history being made.”

French tightrope artist Philippe Petit upstaged James Marsh and Simon Chinn, winners of the best documentary award for “Man on Wire,” which recounts Petit’s wire-walk between the twin towers of the World Trade Center. He punctuated his thanks by making a lucky coin, given to him by director Werner Herzog disappear and balancing the Oscar on his chin.

The prize for documentary short went to Megan Mylan for “Smile Pinki,” a film about an Indian girl who is successfully treated for a cleft lip.

The Japanese film “Departures,” the tale of an unemployed cellist who takes a job in a funeral home, directed by Yojiro Takita, pulled something of a minor upset in the foreign-language film category, where it was competing against such internationally known titles as Israel’s “Waltz With Bashir” and France’s “The Class.”

Spoofing traditional Oscar night opening numbers, host Hugh Jackman kicked off the show by offering his low-rent tribute to the nominated films — and even some that were left out of the best picture circle like “The Dark Knight” and “Iron Man” — winning the evening’s first standing ovation for his efforts.

He even enlisted a game Anne Hathaway, who sang the role of Richard Nixon to his David Frost as together they parodied “Frost/Nixon.”

Source: Hollywood Reporter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

‘Slumdog’ tops Oscars

“Slumdog Millionaire,” a rags-to-riches tale both on screen and off, was named best picture at the 81st Annual Academy Awards. The indie movie that fought an uphill battle to worldwide recognition took home eight awards, including best director honors for filmmaker Danny Boyle.

Accepting the award, surrounded by the movie’s cast and crew, many of whom had flown in from India for the awards, producer Christian Colson said, “together we have been on an extraordinary journey.” Noting that the film had no stars, he cited a script that engendered “mad love” and a “genius” director for its success. “Most of all we had passion and we had belief and if you have those things, anything is possible.”

Senn Penn earned his second Oscar as best actor for his performance as gay activist Harvey Milk in the biopic “Milk.”

Sean Penn earned his second Oscar as best actor at the 81st Annual Academy Awards for his performance as gay activist Harvey Milk in the biopic “Milk.”

“You commie-loving sons of guns,” Penn joked as he stepped to the podium. “I did not expect this, and I wanted to be very clear that I know how hard I make it to appreciate me often, but I am touched by this appreciation.

Turning serious, he thanked the film’s creators, including director Gus Van Sant, before issuing a fierce call for “equal rights for everyone,” praise for the country for electing “an elegant man president” and a special word of appreciation for fellow nominee Mickey Rourke, saying, “he is my brother.”

Kate Winslet, on her sixth nomination, finally copped an Oscar, winning the trophy for best actress.

Her performance as a German woman harboring lethal secrets in “The Reader” finally brought her the moment that she admitted she’d been dreaming of ever since she was a young girl practicing an acceptance speech in front of the bathroom mirror. “This would have been a shampoo bottle,” she said, hoisting her statuette. “Well, it’s not a shampoo bottle now.”

“Slumdog” earned Danny Boyle the best director prize.

Accepting the award, the British director, who found the film of his career in the streets of Mumbai, could only marvel, “You’ve been so generous to us this evening.” Thanking the people of Mumbai as he hoisted his statuette, he said, “You dwarf even this guy, thank you so much indeed.

Adding an emotional coda to a career that was cut down in its prime, the Academy saluted the late Heath Ledger as best supporting actor.

His posthumous award for “The Dark Knight” was accepted by his father, mother and sister.

“This award tonight would have humbly validated Heath’s quiet determination to be truly accepted by your here, his peers, in an industry he so loved,” his father, Kim, said.

His mother, Sally Bell, added, “Tonight we are choosing to celebrate and be happy for what he has achieved,” while his sister completed the thought by saying, “we proudly accept this award on behalf of your beautiful (daughter) Matilda.”

Ledger, who died of an accidental overdose on Jan. 22, 2008, became only the second performer to win an Oscar posthumously, following in the steps of Peter Finch, who was posthumously named best actor more than 30 years ago for his performance in 1976’s “Network.”

Penelope Cruz took home the first Oscar of the evening as the 81st Annual Academy Awards got under way Sunday night at the Kodak Theatre at Hollywood & Highland.

Winning the best supporting actress prize for her performance as a Latin spitfire in “Vicki Cristina Barcelona,” Cruz wondered: “Has anybody ever fainted here, because I might be the first one.” Thanking her director, Woody Allen, “for trusting me with this beautiful character,” she dedicated the award to her parents, brothers and sisters, and her friend, the late publicity executive Robert Garlock.

Pixar’s “WALL-E,” directed by Andrew Stanton, was named best animated feature. Accepting the trophy, Stanton said: “It’s been such an inspiration to spend time with a character who so tenaciously struggles to see beauty in everything he sees.” He also revealed one of the movie’s inspirations by thanking his high school drama teacher for years ago casting him in a production of “Hello, Dolly.”

He was followed to the stage by Japanese animator Kurio Kato, whose “La Maison en Petits Cubes” was named best animated short film.

The Oscar for original screenplay went to Dustin Lance Black for “Milk.” Black delivered an emotional acceptance, recounting how learning of gay activist Harvey Milk had given him hope as a teenager that “I could live my life openly as who I am and one day I could fall in love and even get married.” Turning to young gay and lesbian viewers watching the broadcast, he said: “You are beautiful, wonderful creatures of value, and no matter what anyone tells you, God does love you.”

“Slumdog Millionaire” earned Simon Beaufoy the adapted screenplay award for his adaptation of Vikas Swarup’s novel. “I never would be standing here tonight without Vikras,” he said.

“Slumdog” began to develop further momentum as Anthony Dod Mantle won the prize for cinematography. “Danny, it starts with you,” he hailed the film’s director Danny Boyle.

“Slumdog” brought back-to-back Oscars for composer A.R. Rahman, recepient of the gold for best score and best song, the upbeat “Jai Ho,” which serves as the movie’s infectious finale.

“All my life, I’ve had a choice of hate and love. I chose love and I’m here. God bless,” Rahman said in his second acceptance.

“The Curious Case of Benjamin Button,” which begins and ends in New Orleans but also roams the world, claimed the honors for best art direction, with Donald Graham Burt and Victor J. Zolfo picking up the award.

Greg Cannom earned the third Oscar of his career, winning the best makeup award for “Button.”

The 18th century gowns on view in “The Dutchess” earned Michael O’Connor his first Oscar for costume design. He saluted his leading lady, saying, “Keira Knightley, you are one classy lady.”

After a tribute to action movies, Will Smith handed out a trio of awards in the postproduction field. “The Dark Knight” took the trophy for sound editing, while “Slumdog” picked up two back-to-back awards, for sound mixing and film editing.

Accepting the sound mixing award, “Slumdog’s” Result Pookutty said: “I dedicate this award to my country. This is not just a sound award. This is history being made.”

French tightrope artist Philippe Petit upstaged James Marsh and Simon Chinn, winners of the best documentary award for “Man on Wire,” which recounts Petit’s wire-walk between the twin towers of the World Trade Center. He punctuated his thanks by making a lucky coin, given to him by director Werner Herzog disappear and balancing the Oscar on his chin.

The prize for documentary short went to Megan Mylan for “Smile Pinki,” a film about an Indian girl who is successfully treated for a cleft lip.

The Japanese film “Departures,” the tale of an unemployed cellist who takes a job in a funeral home, directed by Yojiro Takita, pulled something of a minor upset in the foreign-language film category, where it was competing against such internationally known titles as Israel’s “Waltz With Bashir” and France’s “The Class.”

Spoofing traditional Oscar night opening numbers, host Hugh Jackman kicked off the show by offering his low-rent tribute to the nominated films — and even some that were left out of the best picture circle like “The Dark Knight” and “Iron Man” — winning the evening’s first standing ovation for his efforts.

He even enlisted a game Anne Hathaway, who sang the role of Richard Nixon to his David Frost as together they parodied “Frost/Nixon.”

Source: Hollywood Reporter

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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