Sep 22, 2019
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Broadcasters, cable execs make final pitch to MPs

OTTAWA – Senior executives at the country’s biggest conventional TV networks and cable and satellite carriers made their final pitch Wednesday at a closed-door meeting of a parliamentary committee that is soon expected to make recommendations on the future of local television in Canada.

Executives from conventional broadcasters such as CTV and Global TV, as well as from cable and satellite TV providers such as Rogers, Bell and Shaw, were invited by the Commons Canadian heritage committee to participate in a roundtable discussion.

GlobalTV is owned by Canwest Global Communications Corp. which also operates Canwest News Service.

Pierre Karl Peladeau, CEO of cable provider Quebecor, was also expected to attend, as were executives from the CBC, the Canadian Film and Television Production Association, and the union that represents conventional TV employees.

Committee members said the meeting was held in camera to encourage TV and cable executives, who have been embroiled in a public feud over the struggles of the conventional broadcasting industry, to tone down the rhetoric and explore the potential for common ground.

“The reason it’s in camera is just to give people the chance to talk freely,” said New Democrat MP Charlie Angus. “Let’s just cut the rhetoric and the blame.”

Conventional broadcasters have long argued cable and satellite companies should pay fees for the signals provided by local stations. Currently, the signals are free, although cable and satellite providers are required to carry them.

CTV recently launched a “Save Local TV” ad campaign that urges the public to support “fee for carriage.” The cable industry has responded with its newspaper ads, while complaining to the CRTC that the CTV campaign violates the Broadcasting Act.

At the committee’s last meeting, CRTC chairman Konrad von Finckenstein once again urged the two sides to negotiate a fair value for the conventional TV signals. In return, however, they will be expected to make “meaningful commitments” to local programming and Canadian content, he warned.

Angus said he and other committee members will watch for signs the TV networks and carriers can work together.

“I want to know, ‘Yeah, are you guys going to continue to throw rocks and expect government or the CRTC to arbitrate a decision.’ Is there a way forward?” he said.

The committee is expected to table its recommendations before Parliament rises for its summer break on June 23.

Source: Canwest News Service

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Front Page, Industry News

Broadcasters, cable execs make final pitch to MPs

OTTAWA – Senior executives at the country’s biggest conventional TV networks and cable and satellite carriers made their final pitch Wednesday at a closed-door meeting of a parliamentary committee that is soon expected to make recommendations on the future of local television in Canada.

Executives from conventional broadcasters such as CTV and Global TV, as well as from cable and satellite TV providers such as Rogers, Bell and Shaw, were invited by the Commons Canadian heritage committee to participate in a roundtable discussion.

GlobalTV is owned by Canwest Global Communications Corp. which also operates Canwest News Service.

Pierre Karl Peladeau, CEO of cable provider Quebecor, was also expected to attend, as were executives from the CBC, the Canadian Film and Television Production Association, and the union that represents conventional TV employees.

Committee members said the meeting was held in camera to encourage TV and cable executives, who have been embroiled in a public feud over the struggles of the conventional broadcasting industry, to tone down the rhetoric and explore the potential for common ground.

“The reason it’s in camera is just to give people the chance to talk freely,” said New Democrat MP Charlie Angus. “Let’s just cut the rhetoric and the blame.”

Conventional broadcasters have long argued cable and satellite companies should pay fees for the signals provided by local stations. Currently, the signals are free, although cable and satellite providers are required to carry them.

CTV recently launched a “Save Local TV” ad campaign that urges the public to support “fee for carriage.” The cable industry has responded with its newspaper ads, while complaining to the CRTC that the CTV campaign violates the Broadcasting Act.

At the committee’s last meeting, CRTC chairman Konrad von Finckenstein once again urged the two sides to negotiate a fair value for the conventional TV signals. In return, however, they will be expected to make “meaningful commitments” to local programming and Canadian content, he warned.

Angus said he and other committee members will watch for signs the TV networks and carriers can work together.

“I want to know, ‘Yeah, are you guys going to continue to throw rocks and expect government or the CRTC to arbitrate a decision.’ Is there a way forward?” he said.

The committee is expected to table its recommendations before Parliament rises for its summer break on June 23.

Source: Canwest News Service

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Broadcasters, cable execs make final pitch to MPs

OTTAWA – Senior executives at the country’s biggest conventional TV networks and cable and satellite carriers made their final pitch Wednesday at a closed-door meeting of a parliamentary committee that is soon expected to make recommendations on the future of local television in Canada.

Executives from conventional broadcasters such as CTV and Global TV, as well as from cable and satellite TV providers such as Rogers, Bell and Shaw, were invited by the Commons Canadian heritage committee to participate in a roundtable discussion.

GlobalTV is owned by Canwest Global Communications Corp. which also operates Canwest News Service.

Pierre Karl Peladeau, CEO of cable provider Quebecor, was also expected to attend, as were executives from the CBC, the Canadian Film and Television Production Association, and the union that represents conventional TV employees.

Committee members said the meeting was held in camera to encourage TV and cable executives, who have been embroiled in a public feud over the struggles of the conventional broadcasting industry, to tone down the rhetoric and explore the potential for common ground.

“The reason it’s in camera is just to give people the chance to talk freely,” said New Democrat MP Charlie Angus. “Let’s just cut the rhetoric and the blame.”

Conventional broadcasters have long argued cable and satellite companies should pay fees for the signals provided by local stations. Currently, the signals are free, although cable and satellite providers are required to carry them.

CTV recently launched a “Save Local TV” ad campaign that urges the public to support “fee for carriage.” The cable industry has responded with its newspaper ads, while complaining to the CRTC that the CTV campaign violates the Broadcasting Act.

At the committee’s last meeting, CRTC chairman Konrad von Finckenstein once again urged the two sides to negotiate a fair value for the conventional TV signals. In return, however, they will be expected to make “meaningful commitments” to local programming and Canadian content, he warned.

Angus said he and other committee members will watch for signs the TV networks and carriers can work together.

“I want to know, ‘Yeah, are you guys going to continue to throw rocks and expect government or the CRTC to arbitrate a decision.’ Is there a way forward?” he said.

The committee is expected to table its recommendations before Parliament rises for its summer break on June 23.

Source: Canwest News Service

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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