Sep 28, 2021
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BANFF 2009: Better days coming, says Moore at Banff opener

BANFF – An optimistic Canadian Heritage minister said he was “not worried” about Canada’s culture, including its film and TV industries.

Opening the Banff World Television Festival Sunday night, James Moore predicted “there will be better days ahead,” although today was also not a bad time for the industry.

“There have never been more choices for consumers. There have never been more opportunities for producers. We’ve never had the vastness of the audiences we have right now,” he stated.

While Canadians are consuming more media than ever, they are doing it in a different manner than the 32-year-old minister did when he and his family sat down to watch TV during prime time when he was younger.

They are “watching it when they want to watch it” over various platforms, he stated. He also pointed out that 27% of Canadian teenagers using the Internet go to YouTube every day.

And as he is wont to do, he warned the average age of MPs is 57, and that many of the older politicians didn’t understand these new technologies.

Moore advised delegates to parlay their passion for the industry into educating these older politicians – many of whom are decision makers – about the changing media environment, how it works and how important it is.

The government’s role in the media landscape, he noted, was to support the creation of Canadian content. He then spoke about the Canadian Media Fund (CMF), which he unveiled in March and is expected to be operational by April 2010.

He promised more industry consultations and said the CMF’s board would be announced shortly.

He said the fund would be looking for “cutting-edge applications.”

Source: Cartt.ca

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Front Page, Industry News

BANFF 2009: Better days coming, says Moore at Banff opener

BANFF – An optimistic Canadian Heritage minister said he was “not worried” about Canada’s culture, including its film and TV industries.

Opening the Banff World Television Festival Sunday night, James Moore predicted “there will be better days ahead,” although today was also not a bad time for the industry.

“There have never been more choices for consumers. There have never been more opportunities for producers. We’ve never had the vastness of the audiences we have right now,” he stated.

While Canadians are consuming more media than ever, they are doing it in a different manner than the 32-year-old minister did when he and his family sat down to watch TV during prime time when he was younger.

They are “watching it when they want to watch it” over various platforms, he stated. He also pointed out that 27% of Canadian teenagers using the Internet go to YouTube every day.

And as he is wont to do, he warned the average age of MPs is 57, and that many of the older politicians didn’t understand these new technologies.

Moore advised delegates to parlay their passion for the industry into educating these older politicians – many of whom are decision makers – about the changing media environment, how it works and how important it is.

The government’s role in the media landscape, he noted, was to support the creation of Canadian content. He then spoke about the Canadian Media Fund (CMF), which he unveiled in March and is expected to be operational by April 2010.

He promised more industry consultations and said the CMF’s board would be announced shortly.

He said the fund would be looking for “cutting-edge applications.”

Source: Cartt.ca

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

BANFF 2009: Better days coming, says Moore at Banff opener

BANFF – An optimistic Canadian Heritage minister said he was “not worried” about Canada’s culture, including its film and TV industries.

Opening the Banff World Television Festival Sunday night, James Moore predicted “there will be better days ahead,” although today was also not a bad time for the industry.

“There have never been more choices for consumers. There have never been more opportunities for producers. We’ve never had the vastness of the audiences we have right now,” he stated.

While Canadians are consuming more media than ever, they are doing it in a different manner than the 32-year-old minister did when he and his family sat down to watch TV during prime time when he was younger.

They are “watching it when they want to watch it” over various platforms, he stated. He also pointed out that 27% of Canadian teenagers using the Internet go to YouTube every day.

And as he is wont to do, he warned the average age of MPs is 57, and that many of the older politicians didn’t understand these new technologies.

Moore advised delegates to parlay their passion for the industry into educating these older politicians – many of whom are decision makers – about the changing media environment, how it works and how important it is.

The government’s role in the media landscape, he noted, was to support the creation of Canadian content. He then spoke about the Canadian Media Fund (CMF), which he unveiled in March and is expected to be operational by April 2010.

He promised more industry consultations and said the CMF’s board would be announced shortly.

He said the fund would be looking for “cutting-edge applications.”

Source: Cartt.ca

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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