Apr 01, 2020
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Front Page, Industry News

French TV industry thinks globally

TV production companies in France used to concentrate on the home market, and if formats such as “Fort Boyard” or “Des chiffres et des lettres” sold abroad it seemed more like luck than strategy. But things are changing.

“In France, like everywhere else, it is getting harder to make a lot of money producing TV for the main broadcasters,” says Bertrand Villegas of media analysts the Wit.

Pressure to reduce production costs is high, and while digital terrestrial TV has increased demand, these channels are not big spenders. “More and more French production companies are betting on formats to grow their revenues,” Villegas adds.

Meanwhile, international demand for proven formats is bringing more people to Gaul, with players such as FremantleMedia, Endemol, Shine and Zodiak setting up in France or buying local companies.

What happens in France matters.

“The performance of programs in France is of growing importance in other southern European countries,” says Monica Galer, who oversees northern and southern Europe at FremantleMedia. “It’s more important if a program did well in France than if it did well in Germany or in Sweden.”

RDF Rights doesn’t have a local base, but is keen on French formats. “We’re always on the lookout for good, new content, and I think France is definitely a place where there is untapped potential,” say Barnaby Shingleton, head of light entertainment acquisitions. “There’s an originality about French ideas which I think is very good.”

One of his most recent buys is “Panic,” a chatshow where friends of a celebrity secretly prime the interviewer with personal recollections. Originally made by Tout Sur L’Ecran and Adenium France 2, the format has sold in Spain and the Middle East, with options in Scandinavia, Italy, Germany and Belgium.

Seeing this sort of format picked up internationally has encouraged the industry in France. “This has made people realize that we’re not just talking about reality TV and gameshows,” says Mathieu Bejot of TV France Intl., the association of French TV program exporters.

And scripted formats are beginning to travel, with dramas “Dolmen” and “The Hospital” following the early success of comedy “Camera Cafe.” “That is fairly new for us. A few years ago, companies were very reluctant to do this, thinking they should just promote the finished program,” says Bejot.

But reality and gameshows are still the strongest sellers, with some breaking out of France before hitting local screens. FrenchTV’s quiz “Duel” was sold in the U.S. and U.K. before airing in France. Options on the format have now been sold in 25 countries.

Similarly, dating show “Take Me Out” was hatched in France, piloted in the U.K. and bowed in Australia, with deals following in Indonesia, Holland, Denmark, Finland and Spain. Format features a panel of 30 women who decide whether or not to stay in the game to date a single guy as information is revealed about him.

FremantleMedia France came up with the idea at a time when dating shows were not fashionable locally. “We were wrong at that specific time, but in other countries it has happened, and I’m convinced it will come to France eventually,” says Galer.

The ability to use the Fremantle network was key. “The combination of French development with British input is why it has traveled so well.”

“It helps to have a big, powerful international distribution company, and maybe these are still lacking in France,” says Villegas. So people are watching with interest a recent alliance between FrenchTV and pubcaster France Television’s distribution arm to sell “My Family vs. the Nation” before local broadcast. The format, in which a family answers questions submitted by the general public, has so far been optioned in 10 countries.

Source: Variety

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Front Page, Industry News

French TV industry thinks globally

TV production companies in France used to concentrate on the home market, and if formats such as “Fort Boyard” or “Des chiffres et des lettres” sold abroad it seemed more like luck than strategy. But things are changing.

“In France, like everywhere else, it is getting harder to make a lot of money producing TV for the main broadcasters,” says Bertrand Villegas of media analysts the Wit.

Pressure to reduce production costs is high, and while digital terrestrial TV has increased demand, these channels are not big spenders. “More and more French production companies are betting on formats to grow their revenues,” Villegas adds.

Meanwhile, international demand for proven formats is bringing more people to Gaul, with players such as FremantleMedia, Endemol, Shine and Zodiak setting up in France or buying local companies.

What happens in France matters.

“The performance of programs in France is of growing importance in other southern European countries,” says Monica Galer, who oversees northern and southern Europe at FremantleMedia. “It’s more important if a program did well in France than if it did well in Germany or in Sweden.”

RDF Rights doesn’t have a local base, but is keen on French formats. “We’re always on the lookout for good, new content, and I think France is definitely a place where there is untapped potential,” say Barnaby Shingleton, head of light entertainment acquisitions. “There’s an originality about French ideas which I think is very good.”

One of his most recent buys is “Panic,” a chatshow where friends of a celebrity secretly prime the interviewer with personal recollections. Originally made by Tout Sur L’Ecran and Adenium France 2, the format has sold in Spain and the Middle East, with options in Scandinavia, Italy, Germany and Belgium.

Seeing this sort of format picked up internationally has encouraged the industry in France. “This has made people realize that we’re not just talking about reality TV and gameshows,” says Mathieu Bejot of TV France Intl., the association of French TV program exporters.

And scripted formats are beginning to travel, with dramas “Dolmen” and “The Hospital” following the early success of comedy “Camera Cafe.” “That is fairly new for us. A few years ago, companies were very reluctant to do this, thinking they should just promote the finished program,” says Bejot.

But reality and gameshows are still the strongest sellers, with some breaking out of France before hitting local screens. FrenchTV’s quiz “Duel” was sold in the U.S. and U.K. before airing in France. Options on the format have now been sold in 25 countries.

Similarly, dating show “Take Me Out” was hatched in France, piloted in the U.K. and bowed in Australia, with deals following in Indonesia, Holland, Denmark, Finland and Spain. Format features a panel of 30 women who decide whether or not to stay in the game to date a single guy as information is revealed about him.

FremantleMedia France came up with the idea at a time when dating shows were not fashionable locally. “We were wrong at that specific time, but in other countries it has happened, and I’m convinced it will come to France eventually,” says Galer.

The ability to use the Fremantle network was key. “The combination of French development with British input is why it has traveled so well.”

“It helps to have a big, powerful international distribution company, and maybe these are still lacking in France,” says Villegas. So people are watching with interest a recent alliance between FrenchTV and pubcaster France Television’s distribution arm to sell “My Family vs. the Nation” before local broadcast. The format, in which a family answers questions submitted by the general public, has so far been optioned in 10 countries.

Source: Variety

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You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

French TV industry thinks globally

TV production companies in France used to concentrate on the home market, and if formats such as “Fort Boyard” or “Des chiffres et des lettres” sold abroad it seemed more like luck than strategy. But things are changing.

“In France, like everywhere else, it is getting harder to make a lot of money producing TV for the main broadcasters,” says Bertrand Villegas of media analysts the Wit.

Pressure to reduce production costs is high, and while digital terrestrial TV has increased demand, these channels are not big spenders. “More and more French production companies are betting on formats to grow their revenues,” Villegas adds.

Meanwhile, international demand for proven formats is bringing more people to Gaul, with players such as FremantleMedia, Endemol, Shine and Zodiak setting up in France or buying local companies.

What happens in France matters.

“The performance of programs in France is of growing importance in other southern European countries,” says Monica Galer, who oversees northern and southern Europe at FremantleMedia. “It’s more important if a program did well in France than if it did well in Germany or in Sweden.”

RDF Rights doesn’t have a local base, but is keen on French formats. “We’re always on the lookout for good, new content, and I think France is definitely a place where there is untapped potential,” say Barnaby Shingleton, head of light entertainment acquisitions. “There’s an originality about French ideas which I think is very good.”

One of his most recent buys is “Panic,” a chatshow where friends of a celebrity secretly prime the interviewer with personal recollections. Originally made by Tout Sur L’Ecran and Adenium France 2, the format has sold in Spain and the Middle East, with options in Scandinavia, Italy, Germany and Belgium.

Seeing this sort of format picked up internationally has encouraged the industry in France. “This has made people realize that we’re not just talking about reality TV and gameshows,” says Mathieu Bejot of TV France Intl., the association of French TV program exporters.

And scripted formats are beginning to travel, with dramas “Dolmen” and “The Hospital” following the early success of comedy “Camera Cafe.” “That is fairly new for us. A few years ago, companies were very reluctant to do this, thinking they should just promote the finished program,” says Bejot.

But reality and gameshows are still the strongest sellers, with some breaking out of France before hitting local screens. FrenchTV’s quiz “Duel” was sold in the U.S. and U.K. before airing in France. Options on the format have now been sold in 25 countries.

Similarly, dating show “Take Me Out” was hatched in France, piloted in the U.K. and bowed in Australia, with deals following in Indonesia, Holland, Denmark, Finland and Spain. Format features a panel of 30 women who decide whether or not to stay in the game to date a single guy as information is revealed about him.

FremantleMedia France came up with the idea at a time when dating shows were not fashionable locally. “We were wrong at that specific time, but in other countries it has happened, and I’m convinced it will come to France eventually,” says Galer.

The ability to use the Fremantle network was key. “The combination of French development with British input is why it has traveled so well.”

“It helps to have a big, powerful international distribution company, and maybe these are still lacking in France,” says Villegas. So people are watching with interest a recent alliance between FrenchTV and pubcaster France Television’s distribution arm to sell “My Family vs. the Nation” before local broadcast. The format, in which a family answers questions submitted by the general public, has so far been optioned in 10 countries.

Source: Variety

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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