May 17, 2021
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‘Flashpoint’ takes top honours at 2009 Gemini Awards celebrating top Canadian TV

CALGARY – Producers of the cross-border hit “Flashpoint” held it up as an example of what Canadian television is capable of as the slick CTV cop drama took home three Gemini Awards on Saturday, including best drama.

Canadians can be less than supportive when it comes to watching homegrown shows on the small screen.

But executive producer Bill Mustos said there’s actually a lot to be proud of, and other countries are taking notice.

“I think ‘Flashpoint’ has moved things into a new direction and now American networks are looking across the border and seeing that there is actually tremendous talent in (Canada),” he said just after winning the final award of the broadcast gala.

“That’s an exciting kind of new sea change for our country.”

Of course, not every Canadian show is a hit. The quirky country-music show “Three Chords from the Truth” won for best comedy ensemble performance despite being cancelled after only 10 episodes.

“There’s nothing better than being recognized by your peers,” star Phyllis Ellis said as she accepted her Gemini. “Except for maybe a second season.”

“Anybody wanna buy a TV show?” interjected a castmate.

CBC’s “Rick Mercer Report” took the award for best comedy, while George Stroumboulopoulos was honoured as best talk show host for a second year running.

Stroumboulopoulos said his show is attracting interest from other countries because it reflects Canadian values.

“To be able to make television in the country that you love and the country that you want to make television in, man, that is a gift,” he said.

“And we think we can do this stuff and talk about Canada and other parts of the world and everybody else kind of picks up on it.”

“Flashpoint” star Enrico Colantoni, who won best actor, was lured back to his hometown of Toronto for the series after working for nearly 25 years in the United States on shows such as “Just Shoot Me” and “Veronica Mars.”

He called it “a wonderful way to come home.”

“This show represents a nation, in a way, we’re representing in the United States and the world,” Colantoni said. “It’s like, ‘this is what we can do.’ “

The drama about a S.W.A.T. team working in Toronto also won three awards at a pre-show ceremony and nabbed the best director trophy for Kelly Makin.

Colantoni’s co-star and fellow best actor nominee Hugh Dillon also won an award for best supporting actor for the TV movie “Of Murder and Memory.”

Citytv’s dark comedy “Less Than Kind” was left without a single trophy despite leading the sitcom nominations with nine nods.

The sexy period drama “The Tudors” was also shut out at Saturday’s broadcast awards after earning 11 nominations overall. It had already won four trophies in separate ceremonies held last month.

After traditionally being held in Toronto, the awards have moved about the country in recent years. The gala in Calgary marked the first time the awards were handed out in Alberta.

The location no doubt made it special for Albertan Erin Karpluk, who took best dramatic actress for her lead role in the time-travelling show “Being Erica.”

It was also a homecoming for presenter Cory Monteith, who stars in the runaway hit U.S. musical comedy “Glee,” and was born in Calgary.

“What better way to have a homecoming than this? This is incredible,” he gushed while walking the red carpet.

“Corner Gas,” dubbed by some as the most popular Canadian television show ever, failed to score a single nomination for the final season of its six-year run, something creator Brent Butt has called “kinda goofy.” The Saskatchewan-based show had been nominated for best comedy every other year it aired and took home the award in 2005, 2006 and 2007.

“Corner Gas” was one of three shows saluted during the Gemini broadcast, along with “Royal Canadian Air Farce” and “Trailer Park Boys.” All three shows have recently wrapped their final seasons and were honoured with a retrospective of funny on-air moments.

Diana Swain of “CBC News at Six” was crowned the best news anchor, while the CBC show Dragons’ Den, in which inventors try to pitch their wares to a panel of wary investors, scored the trophy for best reality program.

Source: The Canadian Press

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Front Page, Industry News

‘Flashpoint’ takes top honours at 2009 Gemini Awards celebrating top Canadian TV

CALGARY – Producers of the cross-border hit “Flashpoint” held it up as an example of what Canadian television is capable of as the slick CTV cop drama took home three Gemini Awards on Saturday, including best drama.

Canadians can be less than supportive when it comes to watching homegrown shows on the small screen.

But executive producer Bill Mustos said there’s actually a lot to be proud of, and other countries are taking notice.

“I think ‘Flashpoint’ has moved things into a new direction and now American networks are looking across the border and seeing that there is actually tremendous talent in (Canada),” he said just after winning the final award of the broadcast gala.

“That’s an exciting kind of new sea change for our country.”

Of course, not every Canadian show is a hit. The quirky country-music show “Three Chords from the Truth” won for best comedy ensemble performance despite being cancelled after only 10 episodes.

“There’s nothing better than being recognized by your peers,” star Phyllis Ellis said as she accepted her Gemini. “Except for maybe a second season.”

“Anybody wanna buy a TV show?” interjected a castmate.

CBC’s “Rick Mercer Report” took the award for best comedy, while George Stroumboulopoulos was honoured as best talk show host for a second year running.

Stroumboulopoulos said his show is attracting interest from other countries because it reflects Canadian values.

“To be able to make television in the country that you love and the country that you want to make television in, man, that is a gift,” he said.

“And we think we can do this stuff and talk about Canada and other parts of the world and everybody else kind of picks up on it.”

“Flashpoint” star Enrico Colantoni, who won best actor, was lured back to his hometown of Toronto for the series after working for nearly 25 years in the United States on shows such as “Just Shoot Me” and “Veronica Mars.”

He called it “a wonderful way to come home.”

“This show represents a nation, in a way, we’re representing in the United States and the world,” Colantoni said. “It’s like, ‘this is what we can do.’ “

The drama about a S.W.A.T. team working in Toronto also won three awards at a pre-show ceremony and nabbed the best director trophy for Kelly Makin.

Colantoni’s co-star and fellow best actor nominee Hugh Dillon also won an award for best supporting actor for the TV movie “Of Murder and Memory.”

Citytv’s dark comedy “Less Than Kind” was left without a single trophy despite leading the sitcom nominations with nine nods.

The sexy period drama “The Tudors” was also shut out at Saturday’s broadcast awards after earning 11 nominations overall. It had already won four trophies in separate ceremonies held last month.

After traditionally being held in Toronto, the awards have moved about the country in recent years. The gala in Calgary marked the first time the awards were handed out in Alberta.

The location no doubt made it special for Albertan Erin Karpluk, who took best dramatic actress for her lead role in the time-travelling show “Being Erica.”

It was also a homecoming for presenter Cory Monteith, who stars in the runaway hit U.S. musical comedy “Glee,” and was born in Calgary.

“What better way to have a homecoming than this? This is incredible,” he gushed while walking the red carpet.

“Corner Gas,” dubbed by some as the most popular Canadian television show ever, failed to score a single nomination for the final season of its six-year run, something creator Brent Butt has called “kinda goofy.” The Saskatchewan-based show had been nominated for best comedy every other year it aired and took home the award in 2005, 2006 and 2007.

“Corner Gas” was one of three shows saluted during the Gemini broadcast, along with “Royal Canadian Air Farce” and “Trailer Park Boys.” All three shows have recently wrapped their final seasons and were honoured with a retrospective of funny on-air moments.

Diana Swain of “CBC News at Six” was crowned the best news anchor, while the CBC show Dragons’ Den, in which inventors try to pitch their wares to a panel of wary investors, scored the trophy for best reality program.

Source: The Canadian Press

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

‘Flashpoint’ takes top honours at 2009 Gemini Awards celebrating top Canadian TV

CALGARY – Producers of the cross-border hit “Flashpoint” held it up as an example of what Canadian television is capable of as the slick CTV cop drama took home three Gemini Awards on Saturday, including best drama.

Canadians can be less than supportive when it comes to watching homegrown shows on the small screen.

But executive producer Bill Mustos said there’s actually a lot to be proud of, and other countries are taking notice.

“I think ‘Flashpoint’ has moved things into a new direction and now American networks are looking across the border and seeing that there is actually tremendous talent in (Canada),” he said just after winning the final award of the broadcast gala.

“That’s an exciting kind of new sea change for our country.”

Of course, not every Canadian show is a hit. The quirky country-music show “Three Chords from the Truth” won for best comedy ensemble performance despite being cancelled after only 10 episodes.

“There’s nothing better than being recognized by your peers,” star Phyllis Ellis said as she accepted her Gemini. “Except for maybe a second season.”

“Anybody wanna buy a TV show?” interjected a castmate.

CBC’s “Rick Mercer Report” took the award for best comedy, while George Stroumboulopoulos was honoured as best talk show host for a second year running.

Stroumboulopoulos said his show is attracting interest from other countries because it reflects Canadian values.

“To be able to make television in the country that you love and the country that you want to make television in, man, that is a gift,” he said.

“And we think we can do this stuff and talk about Canada and other parts of the world and everybody else kind of picks up on it.”

“Flashpoint” star Enrico Colantoni, who won best actor, was lured back to his hometown of Toronto for the series after working for nearly 25 years in the United States on shows such as “Just Shoot Me” and “Veronica Mars.”

He called it “a wonderful way to come home.”

“This show represents a nation, in a way, we’re representing in the United States and the world,” Colantoni said. “It’s like, ‘this is what we can do.’ “

The drama about a S.W.A.T. team working in Toronto also won three awards at a pre-show ceremony and nabbed the best director trophy for Kelly Makin.

Colantoni’s co-star and fellow best actor nominee Hugh Dillon also won an award for best supporting actor for the TV movie “Of Murder and Memory.”

Citytv’s dark comedy “Less Than Kind” was left without a single trophy despite leading the sitcom nominations with nine nods.

The sexy period drama “The Tudors” was also shut out at Saturday’s broadcast awards after earning 11 nominations overall. It had already won four trophies in separate ceremonies held last month.

After traditionally being held in Toronto, the awards have moved about the country in recent years. The gala in Calgary marked the first time the awards were handed out in Alberta.

The location no doubt made it special for Albertan Erin Karpluk, who took best dramatic actress for her lead role in the time-travelling show “Being Erica.”

It was also a homecoming for presenter Cory Monteith, who stars in the runaway hit U.S. musical comedy “Glee,” and was born in Calgary.

“What better way to have a homecoming than this? This is incredible,” he gushed while walking the red carpet.

“Corner Gas,” dubbed by some as the most popular Canadian television show ever, failed to score a single nomination for the final season of its six-year run, something creator Brent Butt has called “kinda goofy.” The Saskatchewan-based show had been nominated for best comedy every other year it aired and took home the award in 2005, 2006 and 2007.

“Corner Gas” was one of three shows saluted during the Gemini broadcast, along with “Royal Canadian Air Farce” and “Trailer Park Boys.” All three shows have recently wrapped their final seasons and were honoured with a retrospective of funny on-air moments.

Diana Swain of “CBC News at Six” was crowned the best news anchor, while the CBC show Dragons’ Den, in which inventors try to pitch their wares to a panel of wary investors, scored the trophy for best reality program.

Source: The Canadian Press

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