Jul 22, 2019
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Front Page, Industry News

Digital marketing and the challenge of nailing jelly to the wall

By TO411Daily Columnist Linda Chandler

It’s not like the good old days when you could buy time on Friends and Neilson could assure you ‘reach.’ Not with our digital customer. The algorithms are different. Don’t ask me how. The digital consumer is an elusive social butterfly. And until the day when there’s an app for that, say… “iCustomer,” marketers and advertisers will have to stalk Big Brother – like into the consumer’s every caprice. Trying to anticipate what they want now, and what they want now, and what they want now.

Basically I think we’re talking about a consumer with severe ADHD.

Ad Age concludes, “The emergence of an attention economy has made consumers hard to reach.”

So I reached out to Tony Chapman, founder and CEO of Capital C, one of my favourite thinking, evolving, digitally savvy agencies, and asked him how this digital challenge is going to evolve.

Chapman: Advertisers and markets will fish where the fish are – targeting a single consumer or a ‘school’ of consumers vs. the drift net which is mass media – which is one size fits all.

I’m thinking it’s a like a fishing expedition for Moby Dick. 

Chapman: A consumer will identify themselves through RFID tags, or by swiping a card where the digital screen will display advertising based on their preferences, and past purchase behaviour.

Real time is the trick.

Gary Chaikin, founder of Cozumo, a mobile marketing company to watch says, “the point-of-sale is the single most important factor of the mobile coupon market. All the partnerships and ad networks in the world are useless if the technology isn’t in place to make the process simple and easy for both the customer and the clerk working the register.”

But getting to the consumer is a vastly different objective than getting the consumer to endorse you. A coupon’s a deal, but is it enough? How do you get a consumer to like you enough to chat you up with her network of friends? How do you find that chatty Cathy, I wonder?

I asked Paul Allamby, EVP, New Client Development/Strategic at Havas.

Allamby: You need great creative to initiate a dialogue and to create engagement. But in social media, relevance is more important than creativity. Ultimately, you need the social ‘content’ or ‘stories’ that will spark interest, and will generate waves! That crazy app your buddy is on, the wacky mum who puts curlers in her cat’s hair – it all gets attention. But if it stops there, then you get threads or waves of commentary and that’s all. Conversation over. A social media strategy goes beyond this to create dialogue through relevance and engagement.

I get that social networking thing. I, who have never collected anything in my life, have an immodest collection of connections. I am a busy little beaver on my networks. And as a Creative Director and Copywriter, I watch my advertising community trying to build their brands on the worldwide web. Where there lives the visceral promise of creating a digital campaign that might go Old Spice.* I mean what CEO in his right mind wouldn’t sell his mother to have a campaign go viral?

And herein lies my ultimate question: if “viral” is the desired outcome, is the host a disease?

At the opening of this millennium, the eminent psychiatrist and poet, Norman Doidge, author of “The Brain that Changes Itself” said that the brain was not hard-wired as we thought but had a neuro-plasticity that allowed it to travel to new pathways. Thus altering how one might recover from a stroke or even autism.

But how many pathways can we travel in one day? Do you find you put your computer to sleep with just a little more tenderness than your do your kids? 

Next Wednesday, I’ll be following two young digital companies and find out how they do it. And in two weeks, I’ll be interviewing Arthur Fleishman, Partner and President of John St.

Anything you want to ask about strategy and winning and keeping business, let me know and I’ll ask. 

I’d like to thank the following sources of inspiration and offer them to you.

Everything you need to know about SNM by the brilliant thinker, Bennett Klein, one of the principals at Capital C, (I swear they’re not paying me for all this press, they got back to me – and they’re great people too!

Click this link to be inspired:
www.capitalc.ca

The Brain That Changes Itself by Norman Doidge, M.D.

http://www.onedegree.ca/social_media/index

www.bigorangeslide.com

The Top 10 Viral Ads of All Time

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.

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Front Page, Industry News

Digital marketing and the challenge of nailing jelly to the wall

By TO411Daily Columnist Linda Chandler

It’s not like the good old days when you could buy time on Friends and Neilson could assure you ‘reach.’ Not with our digital customer. The algorithms are different. Don’t ask me how. The digital consumer is an elusive social butterfly. And until the day when there’s an app for that, say… “iCustomer,” marketers and advertisers will have to stalk Big Brother – like into the consumer’s every caprice. Trying to anticipate what they want now, and what they want now, and what they want now.

Basically I think we’re talking about a consumer with severe ADHD.

Ad Age concludes, “The emergence of an attention economy has made consumers hard to reach.”

So I reached out to Tony Chapman, founder and CEO of Capital C, one of my favourite thinking, evolving, digitally savvy agencies, and asked him how this digital challenge is going to evolve.

Chapman: Advertisers and markets will fish where the fish are – targeting a single consumer or a ‘school’ of consumers vs. the drift net which is mass media – which is one size fits all.

I’m thinking it’s a like a fishing expedition for Moby Dick. 

Chapman: A consumer will identify themselves through RFID tags, or by swiping a card where the digital screen will display advertising based on their preferences, and past purchase behaviour.

Real time is the trick.

Gary Chaikin, founder of Cozumo, a mobile marketing company to watch says, “the point-of-sale is the single most important factor of the mobile coupon market. All the partnerships and ad networks in the world are useless if the technology isn’t in place to make the process simple and easy for both the customer and the clerk working the register.”

But getting to the consumer is a vastly different objective than getting the consumer to endorse you. A coupon’s a deal, but is it enough? How do you get a consumer to like you enough to chat you up with her network of friends? How do you find that chatty Cathy, I wonder?

I asked Paul Allamby, EVP, New Client Development/Strategic at Havas.

Allamby: You need great creative to initiate a dialogue and to create engagement. But in social media, relevance is more important than creativity. Ultimately, you need the social ‘content’ or ‘stories’ that will spark interest, and will generate waves! That crazy app your buddy is on, the wacky mum who puts curlers in her cat’s hair – it all gets attention. But if it stops there, then you get threads or waves of commentary and that’s all. Conversation over. A social media strategy goes beyond this to create dialogue through relevance and engagement.

I get that social networking thing. I, who have never collected anything in my life, have an immodest collection of connections. I am a busy little beaver on my networks. And as a Creative Director and Copywriter, I watch my advertising community trying to build their brands on the worldwide web. Where there lives the visceral promise of creating a digital campaign that might go Old Spice.* I mean what CEO in his right mind wouldn’t sell his mother to have a campaign go viral?

And herein lies my ultimate question: if “viral” is the desired outcome, is the host a disease?

At the opening of this millennium, the eminent psychiatrist and poet, Norman Doidge, author of “The Brain that Changes Itself” said that the brain was not hard-wired as we thought but had a neuro-plasticity that allowed it to travel to new pathways. Thus altering how one might recover from a stroke or even autism.

But how many pathways can we travel in one day? Do you find you put your computer to sleep with just a little more tenderness than your do your kids? 

Next Wednesday, I’ll be following two young digital companies and find out how they do it. And in two weeks, I’ll be interviewing Arthur Fleishman, Partner and President of John St.

Anything you want to ask about strategy and winning and keeping business, let me know and I’ll ask. 

I’d like to thank the following sources of inspiration and offer them to you.

Everything you need to know about SNM by the brilliant thinker, Bennett Klein, one of the principals at Capital C, (I swear they’re not paying me for all this press, they got back to me – and they’re great people too!

Click this link to be inspired:
www.capitalc.ca

The Brain That Changes Itself by Norman Doidge, M.D.

http://www.onedegree.ca/social_media/index

www.bigorangeslide.com

The Top 10 Viral Ads of All Time

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Digital marketing and the challenge of nailing jelly to the wall

By TO411Daily Columnist Linda Chandler

It’s not like the good old days when you could buy time on Friends and Neilson could assure you ‘reach.’ Not with our digital customer. The algorithms are different. Don’t ask me how. The digital consumer is an elusive social butterfly. And until the day when there’s an app for that, say… “iCustomer,” marketers and advertisers will have to stalk Big Brother – like into the consumer’s every caprice. Trying to anticipate what they want now, and what they want now, and what they want now.

Basically I think we’re talking about a consumer with severe ADHD.

Ad Age concludes, “The emergence of an attention economy has made consumers hard to reach.”

So I reached out to Tony Chapman, founder and CEO of Capital C, one of my favourite thinking, evolving, digitally savvy agencies, and asked him how this digital challenge is going to evolve.

Chapman: Advertisers and markets will fish where the fish are – targeting a single consumer or a ‘school’ of consumers vs. the drift net which is mass media – which is one size fits all.

I’m thinking it’s a like a fishing expedition for Moby Dick. 

Chapman: A consumer will identify themselves through RFID tags, or by swiping a card where the digital screen will display advertising based on their preferences, and past purchase behaviour.

Real time is the trick.

Gary Chaikin, founder of Cozumo, a mobile marketing company to watch says, “the point-of-sale is the single most important factor of the mobile coupon market. All the partnerships and ad networks in the world are useless if the technology isn’t in place to make the process simple and easy for both the customer and the clerk working the register.”

But getting to the consumer is a vastly different objective than getting the consumer to endorse you. A coupon’s a deal, but is it enough? How do you get a consumer to like you enough to chat you up with her network of friends? How do you find that chatty Cathy, I wonder?

I asked Paul Allamby, EVP, New Client Development/Strategic at Havas.

Allamby: You need great creative to initiate a dialogue and to create engagement. But in social media, relevance is more important than creativity. Ultimately, you need the social ‘content’ or ‘stories’ that will spark interest, and will generate waves! That crazy app your buddy is on, the wacky mum who puts curlers in her cat’s hair – it all gets attention. But if it stops there, then you get threads or waves of commentary and that’s all. Conversation over. A social media strategy goes beyond this to create dialogue through relevance and engagement.

I get that social networking thing. I, who have never collected anything in my life, have an immodest collection of connections. I am a busy little beaver on my networks. And as a Creative Director and Copywriter, I watch my advertising community trying to build their brands on the worldwide web. Where there lives the visceral promise of creating a digital campaign that might go Old Spice.* I mean what CEO in his right mind wouldn’t sell his mother to have a campaign go viral?

And herein lies my ultimate question: if “viral” is the desired outcome, is the host a disease?

At the opening of this millennium, the eminent psychiatrist and poet, Norman Doidge, author of “The Brain that Changes Itself” said that the brain was not hard-wired as we thought but had a neuro-plasticity that allowed it to travel to new pathways. Thus altering how one might recover from a stroke or even autism.

But how many pathways can we travel in one day? Do you find you put your computer to sleep with just a little more tenderness than your do your kids? 

Next Wednesday, I’ll be following two young digital companies and find out how they do it. And in two weeks, I’ll be interviewing Arthur Fleishman, Partner and President of John St.

Anything you want to ask about strategy and winning and keeping business, let me know and I’ll ask. 

I’d like to thank the following sources of inspiration and offer them to you.

Everything you need to know about SNM by the brilliant thinker, Bennett Klein, one of the principals at Capital C, (I swear they’re not paying me for all this press, they got back to me – and they’re great people too!

Click this link to be inspired:
www.capitalc.ca

The Brain That Changes Itself by Norman Doidge, M.D.

http://www.onedegree.ca/social_media/index

www.bigorangeslide.com

The Top 10 Viral Ads of All Time

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.

LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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