Sep 22, 2019
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Front Page, Industry News

REVIEWED – Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews is the latest film directed by Gemini Award winning filmmaker Francine Pelletier, and produced by Motsjo Inc., a Montreal-based film production company owned by Pelletier and David Sherman. The film offers an ever so brief glimpse into the life of one of Canada’s most pugnacious literary geniuses. Richler was part of a group of great Jewish writers and intellectuals, the “Wild Jews”, famous for their cutting wit and fondness for troublemaking, who would go on to become some of the most important writers of their generation.

Coming on the heels of Charlie Foran’s recently published biography, Mordecai: The Life and Times, the doc’s world premier is scheduled just days before the screen adaptation of Barney’s Version (staring Paul Giamatti and Dustin Hoffman), Richler’s beloved final novel, hits Canadian Theatres. The film looks at the making of the man within the context of a particular North American Jewish identity. Richler was a natural agitator and provocateur and the documentary ties those traits strongly to him as a product of his time rather than part of his personality, and reveals that he was actually quite shy and retiring in private. Born and raised on St Urbain street in the Jewish ghetto in Montreal, brought up in the wake of the Holocaust, he was part of a generation that wanted to break the mold, that was no longer willing to be complacent.

While the film does review his life, it is not a biopic. This is not Mordecai Richler 101. You are expected to be familiar with the man, his works and the impact they have had. There are delightful highlights throughout that tease you into wanting to know more, wanting the film to be longer. The film reveals that he met his true love, second wife Florence, two days after he got married to another woman – she was my favorite interview in the film, so I can’t blame the man. The B-roll is charmingly chosen and consists of both archival footage of the Jewish neighborhood in Montréal, lost photographs, including the private chronicles of wife Florence Richler, and select footage from the screen adaptation of The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz that mirrors Richler’s own experiences.

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews includes candid interviews with many of Richler’s friends and colleagues like Margaret Atwood, Rex Murphy (Canadian commentator and author), Adam Gopnick (essayist and staff writer, The New Yorker), Louise Dennys (Executive Vice-President, Random House of Canada). A thoroughly enjoyable peek at what made this controversial Canadian icon, this visual portrait digs deep into the vault of Richler’s life to profile his Jewish upbringing in Quebec and the undeniable impact of the “Wild Jews” on North American culture.

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews, premiers on Bravo! Sunday, December 19 at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT , with a repeat broadcast on Saturday, December 25 at 7 p.m. ET / 4 p.m. PT.

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Front Page, Industry News

REVIEWED – Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews is the latest film directed by Gemini Award winning filmmaker Francine Pelletier, and produced by Motsjo Inc., a Montreal-based film production company owned by Pelletier and David Sherman. The film offers an ever so brief glimpse into the life of one of Canada’s most pugnacious literary geniuses. Richler was part of a group of great Jewish writers and intellectuals, the “Wild Jews”, famous for their cutting wit and fondness for troublemaking, who would go on to become some of the most important writers of their generation.

Coming on the heels of Charlie Foran’s recently published biography, Mordecai: The Life and Times, the doc’s world premier is scheduled just days before the screen adaptation of Barney’s Version (staring Paul Giamatti and Dustin Hoffman), Richler’s beloved final novel, hits Canadian Theatres. The film looks at the making of the man within the context of a particular North American Jewish identity. Richler was a natural agitator and provocateur and the documentary ties those traits strongly to him as a product of his time rather than part of his personality, and reveals that he was actually quite shy and retiring in private. Born and raised on St Urbain street in the Jewish ghetto in Montreal, brought up in the wake of the Holocaust, he was part of a generation that wanted to break the mold, that was no longer willing to be complacent.

While the film does review his life, it is not a biopic. This is not Mordecai Richler 101. You are expected to be familiar with the man, his works and the impact they have had. There are delightful highlights throughout that tease you into wanting to know more, wanting the film to be longer. The film reveals that he met his true love, second wife Florence, two days after he got married to another woman – she was my favorite interview in the film, so I can’t blame the man. The B-roll is charmingly chosen and consists of both archival footage of the Jewish neighborhood in Montréal, lost photographs, including the private chronicles of wife Florence Richler, and select footage from the screen adaptation of The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz that mirrors Richler’s own experiences.

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews includes candid interviews with many of Richler’s friends and colleagues like Margaret Atwood, Rex Murphy (Canadian commentator and author), Adam Gopnick (essayist and staff writer, The New Yorker), Louise Dennys (Executive Vice-President, Random House of Canada). A thoroughly enjoyable peek at what made this controversial Canadian icon, this visual portrait digs deep into the vault of Richler’s life to profile his Jewish upbringing in Quebec and the undeniable impact of the “Wild Jews” on North American culture.

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews, premiers on Bravo! Sunday, December 19 at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT , with a repeat broadcast on Saturday, December 25 at 7 p.m. ET / 4 p.m. PT.

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You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

REVIEWED – Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews is the latest film directed by Gemini Award winning filmmaker Francine Pelletier, and produced by Motsjo Inc., a Montreal-based film production company owned by Pelletier and David Sherman. The film offers an ever so brief glimpse into the life of one of Canada’s most pugnacious literary geniuses. Richler was part of a group of great Jewish writers and intellectuals, the “Wild Jews”, famous for their cutting wit and fondness for troublemaking, who would go on to become some of the most important writers of their generation.

Coming on the heels of Charlie Foran’s recently published biography, Mordecai: The Life and Times, the doc’s world premier is scheduled just days before the screen adaptation of Barney’s Version (staring Paul Giamatti and Dustin Hoffman), Richler’s beloved final novel, hits Canadian Theatres. The film looks at the making of the man within the context of a particular North American Jewish identity. Richler was a natural agitator and provocateur and the documentary ties those traits strongly to him as a product of his time rather than part of his personality, and reveals that he was actually quite shy and retiring in private. Born and raised on St Urbain street in the Jewish ghetto in Montreal, brought up in the wake of the Holocaust, he was part of a generation that wanted to break the mold, that was no longer willing to be complacent.

While the film does review his life, it is not a biopic. This is not Mordecai Richler 101. You are expected to be familiar with the man, his works and the impact they have had. There are delightful highlights throughout that tease you into wanting to know more, wanting the film to be longer. The film reveals that he met his true love, second wife Florence, two days after he got married to another woman – she was my favorite interview in the film, so I can’t blame the man. The B-roll is charmingly chosen and consists of both archival footage of the Jewish neighborhood in Montréal, lost photographs, including the private chronicles of wife Florence Richler, and select footage from the screen adaptation of The Apprenticeship of Duddy Kravitz that mirrors Richler’s own experiences.

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews includes candid interviews with many of Richler’s friends and colleagues like Margaret Atwood, Rex Murphy (Canadian commentator and author), Adam Gopnick (essayist and staff writer, The New Yorker), Louise Dennys (Executive Vice-President, Random House of Canada). A thoroughly enjoyable peek at what made this controversial Canadian icon, this visual portrait digs deep into the vault of Richler’s life to profile his Jewish upbringing in Quebec and the undeniable impact of the “Wild Jews” on North American culture.

Mordecai Richler: The Last of the Wild Jews, premiers on Bravo! Sunday, December 19 at 8 p.m. ET / 5 p.m. PT , with a repeat broadcast on Saturday, December 25 at 7 p.m. ET / 4 p.m. PT.

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You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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