May 17, 2021
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THE BRIEF: Advertising Week. To 3D or Not to 3D.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Timing is everything. And building momentum for 3D across advertising platforms today is a little like buying your wedding dress before you meet the guy. Perhaps that’s the reason why the enthusiasm in the TIFF Bell Lighthouse theatre, after a seminar on 3D for Advertising Week, was a bit tepid. The Brief had to wonder whether learning about a technology that’s not quite ready for prime time made some creatives anxious to get back to work. In 2D.

That said, the Brief is a big believer in being ready for the future. So, in the words of James Stewart, the Don Quixote of 3D, Producer/Director of Geneva Films, and the host of this seminar – “Are you ready for the 3D Revolution?” Because as Stewart sees it, “In the future, the work that you’re doing is going to be in stereoscopic 3D.” In his opinion, “There’s no reason why we should continue living in a 2D media world.” It’s so shallow.

3D tells a story. Differently. Stewart believes that the whole purpose of 3D is content. It’s more immersive storytelling. Which is why, he says, “it is so great for brands.” Shooting in 3D, which uses two cameras, a left eye and right eye camera, allows you to physically move the eye where you want it to focus, and create the experience you want the consumer to engage with. Stewart says this richer, more involved experience in 3D has also been proven to increase brand message retention rates. ESPN recently conducted a research study on their 3D TV audience during the World Cup, and results proved that the 3D viewing audience had a 15-16% lift in brand recall, ad liking increased 67% from 2D to 84% with 3D; cued recall 68% with 2D/ 83% with 3D, and purchase intent 68%- 2D/83%- 3D. With numbers like that why would you ever want to shoot in 2D?

ESPN becomes a 3D network. Scott Clarke ESPN’s exec VP-sales and marketing, Sean Bratches, said all commercial inventory on ESPN 3D will be shot in 3-D, not repurposed or converted from 2-D. Advertisers are ready to make the leap into 3-D, too. Sony will be one of the first sponsors to air a 3-D TV ad during the World Cup coverage, Mr. Bratches said, with plans already under way for ESPN’s first 3-D promo, for “This Is SportsCenter.”

All commercial inventory on ESPN 3D will be shot in 3-D, Mr. Bratches added. No spots will be repurposed or converted from 2-D. “We don’t think that’s an experience that is meritorious to the platform,” he said. “From a consumer experience standpoint, we have one time to get this right, and the consumer experience is critically important to us as we look at the ESPN brand, as well as our advertising partners and distribution partners as we look at their brands. The network… will be distributed across Comcast’s full digital footprint of 18.9 million homes later this summer. 

This could be a very creative opportunity for your brands. (How lucky for you that you came to this seminar!)

Similarly, kinda porn takes to 3D. “Break Media and Lionsgate are attempting to figure that out with the official launch of Break’s 3-D channel, sponsored by “Saw 3D.” The site represents the first major 3-D content hub on the web, and features sections such as Life 3D, where Break viewers can watch otherwise ordinary clips of girls in bikinis splashing each other in a pool, having a pillow fight, or swinging on a swingset… but in 3-D. Hollywood studio Lionsgate is, appropriately enough, featuring a version of its trailer for “Saw 3D” and is helping Break get the word out about how viewers can get their free glasses. (The trailer itself is not in 3-D, but the content around it is.)

What does it cost to create in 3D? Production costs for live action, not animation, are 10-25% more than 2D. CG is 10% more. And if you want to convert 2D to 3D it will cost 5K to 100K per minute. The more details, the more layers – the more money.

Deluxe Toronto has been immersed in 3D post production, recently completing the colour correction on “Hubble” (IMAX), the DI and Mix on “Resident Evil 3D: The Afterlife” (Sony, Impact Pictures, Constantin Film) and “Saw VII 3D” (Lionsgate, Evolution). The amount of data captured and in need of processing can be substantial with posting 3D and ups the cost.

Stewart tells us that 3D is about content and it allows for a total visceral experience. But so far, until the day when you don’t need special glasses, The Brief believes you need over-priced theatre popcorn to enjoy it. 

That said, digital 3D is still pretty much on the ground floor of creative innovation. Which means there’s an opportunity for you to break through along all the platforms that will be available to consumers of entertainment and gaming on 3D. Eventually glasses free.

So start dreaming now. In 3D. 

The following are 3D spots featured at Stewart’s seminar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16hPBsw2Uy4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJiL-PAMI80&feature=related

Sources:

‘Saw 3D’ Sponsors Site With Girls-in-Bikini Videos
Posted by Andrew Hampp on 10.08.10 @ 02:52 PM 

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Advertising Week. To 3D or Not to 3D.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Timing is everything. And building momentum for 3D across advertising platforms today is a little like buying your wedding dress before you meet the guy. Perhaps that’s the reason why the enthusiasm in the TIFF Bell Lighthouse theatre, after a seminar on 3D for Advertising Week, was a bit tepid. The Brief had to wonder whether learning about a technology that’s not quite ready for prime time made some creatives anxious to get back to work. In 2D.

That said, the Brief is a big believer in being ready for the future. So, in the words of James Stewart, the Don Quixote of 3D, Producer/Director of Geneva Films, and the host of this seminar – “Are you ready for the 3D Revolution?” Because as Stewart sees it, “In the future, the work that you’re doing is going to be in stereoscopic 3D.” In his opinion, “There’s no reason why we should continue living in a 2D media world.” It’s so shallow.

3D tells a story. Differently. Stewart believes that the whole purpose of 3D is content. It’s more immersive storytelling. Which is why, he says, “it is so great for brands.” Shooting in 3D, which uses two cameras, a left eye and right eye camera, allows you to physically move the eye where you want it to focus, and create the experience you want the consumer to engage with. Stewart says this richer, more involved experience in 3D has also been proven to increase brand message retention rates. ESPN recently conducted a research study on their 3D TV audience during the World Cup, and results proved that the 3D viewing audience had a 15-16% lift in brand recall, ad liking increased 67% from 2D to 84% with 3D; cued recall 68% with 2D/ 83% with 3D, and purchase intent 68%- 2D/83%- 3D. With numbers like that why would you ever want to shoot in 2D?

ESPN becomes a 3D network. Scott Clarke ESPN’s exec VP-sales and marketing, Sean Bratches, said all commercial inventory on ESPN 3D will be shot in 3-D, not repurposed or converted from 2-D. Advertisers are ready to make the leap into 3-D, too. Sony will be one of the first sponsors to air a 3-D TV ad during the World Cup coverage, Mr. Bratches said, with plans already under way for ESPN’s first 3-D promo, for “This Is SportsCenter.”

All commercial inventory on ESPN 3D will be shot in 3-D, Mr. Bratches added. No spots will be repurposed or converted from 2-D. “We don’t think that’s an experience that is meritorious to the platform,” he said. “From a consumer experience standpoint, we have one time to get this right, and the consumer experience is critically important to us as we look at the ESPN brand, as well as our advertising partners and distribution partners as we look at their brands. The network… will be distributed across Comcast’s full digital footprint of 18.9 million homes later this summer. 

This could be a very creative opportunity for your brands. (How lucky for you that you came to this seminar!)

Similarly, kinda porn takes to 3D. “Break Media and Lionsgate are attempting to figure that out with the official launch of Break’s 3-D channel, sponsored by “Saw 3D.” The site represents the first major 3-D content hub on the web, and features sections such as Life 3D, where Break viewers can watch otherwise ordinary clips of girls in bikinis splashing each other in a pool, having a pillow fight, or swinging on a swingset… but in 3-D. Hollywood studio Lionsgate is, appropriately enough, featuring a version of its trailer for “Saw 3D” and is helping Break get the word out about how viewers can get their free glasses. (The trailer itself is not in 3-D, but the content around it is.)

What does it cost to create in 3D? Production costs for live action, not animation, are 10-25% more than 2D. CG is 10% more. And if you want to convert 2D to 3D it will cost 5K to 100K per minute. The more details, the more layers – the more money.

Deluxe Toronto has been immersed in 3D post production, recently completing the colour correction on “Hubble” (IMAX), the DI and Mix on “Resident Evil 3D: The Afterlife” (Sony, Impact Pictures, Constantin Film) and “Saw VII 3D” (Lionsgate, Evolution). The amount of data captured and in need of processing can be substantial with posting 3D and ups the cost.

Stewart tells us that 3D is about content and it allows for a total visceral experience. But so far, until the day when you don’t need special glasses, The Brief believes you need over-priced theatre popcorn to enjoy it. 

That said, digital 3D is still pretty much on the ground floor of creative innovation. Which means there’s an opportunity for you to break through along all the platforms that will be available to consumers of entertainment and gaming on 3D. Eventually glasses free.

So start dreaming now. In 3D. 

The following are 3D spots featured at Stewart’s seminar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16hPBsw2Uy4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJiL-PAMI80&feature=related

Sources:

‘Saw 3D’ Sponsors Site With Girls-in-Bikini Videos
Posted by Andrew Hampp on 10.08.10 @ 02:52 PM 

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Advertising Week. To 3D or Not to 3D.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Timing is everything. And building momentum for 3D across advertising platforms today is a little like buying your wedding dress before you meet the guy. Perhaps that’s the reason why the enthusiasm in the TIFF Bell Lighthouse theatre, after a seminar on 3D for Advertising Week, was a bit tepid. The Brief had to wonder whether learning about a technology that’s not quite ready for prime time made some creatives anxious to get back to work. In 2D.

That said, the Brief is a big believer in being ready for the future. So, in the words of James Stewart, the Don Quixote of 3D, Producer/Director of Geneva Films, and the host of this seminar – “Are you ready for the 3D Revolution?” Because as Stewart sees it, “In the future, the work that you’re doing is going to be in stereoscopic 3D.” In his opinion, “There’s no reason why we should continue living in a 2D media world.” It’s so shallow.

3D tells a story. Differently. Stewart believes that the whole purpose of 3D is content. It’s more immersive storytelling. Which is why, he says, “it is so great for brands.” Shooting in 3D, which uses two cameras, a left eye and right eye camera, allows you to physically move the eye where you want it to focus, and create the experience you want the consumer to engage with. Stewart says this richer, more involved experience in 3D has also been proven to increase brand message retention rates. ESPN recently conducted a research study on their 3D TV audience during the World Cup, and results proved that the 3D viewing audience had a 15-16% lift in brand recall, ad liking increased 67% from 2D to 84% with 3D; cued recall 68% with 2D/ 83% with 3D, and purchase intent 68%- 2D/83%- 3D. With numbers like that why would you ever want to shoot in 2D?

ESPN becomes a 3D network. Scott Clarke ESPN’s exec VP-sales and marketing, Sean Bratches, said all commercial inventory on ESPN 3D will be shot in 3-D, not repurposed or converted from 2-D. Advertisers are ready to make the leap into 3-D, too. Sony will be one of the first sponsors to air a 3-D TV ad during the World Cup coverage, Mr. Bratches said, with plans already under way for ESPN’s first 3-D promo, for “This Is SportsCenter.”

All commercial inventory on ESPN 3D will be shot in 3-D, Mr. Bratches added. No spots will be repurposed or converted from 2-D. “We don’t think that’s an experience that is meritorious to the platform,” he said. “From a consumer experience standpoint, we have one time to get this right, and the consumer experience is critically important to us as we look at the ESPN brand, as well as our advertising partners and distribution partners as we look at their brands. The network… will be distributed across Comcast’s full digital footprint of 18.9 million homes later this summer. 

This could be a very creative opportunity for your brands. (How lucky for you that you came to this seminar!)

Similarly, kinda porn takes to 3D. “Break Media and Lionsgate are attempting to figure that out with the official launch of Break’s 3-D channel, sponsored by “Saw 3D.” The site represents the first major 3-D content hub on the web, and features sections such as Life 3D, where Break viewers can watch otherwise ordinary clips of girls in bikinis splashing each other in a pool, having a pillow fight, or swinging on a swingset… but in 3-D. Hollywood studio Lionsgate is, appropriately enough, featuring a version of its trailer for “Saw 3D” and is helping Break get the word out about how viewers can get their free glasses. (The trailer itself is not in 3-D, but the content around it is.)

What does it cost to create in 3D? Production costs for live action, not animation, are 10-25% more than 2D. CG is 10% more. And if you want to convert 2D to 3D it will cost 5K to 100K per minute. The more details, the more layers – the more money.

Deluxe Toronto has been immersed in 3D post production, recently completing the colour correction on “Hubble” (IMAX), the DI and Mix on “Resident Evil 3D: The Afterlife” (Sony, Impact Pictures, Constantin Film) and “Saw VII 3D” (Lionsgate, Evolution). The amount of data captured and in need of processing can be substantial with posting 3D and ups the cost.

Stewart tells us that 3D is about content and it allows for a total visceral experience. But so far, until the day when you don’t need special glasses, The Brief believes you need over-priced theatre popcorn to enjoy it. 

That said, digital 3D is still pretty much on the ground floor of creative innovation. Which means there’s an opportunity for you to break through along all the platforms that will be available to consumers of entertainment and gaming on 3D. Eventually glasses free.

So start dreaming now. In 3D. 

The following are 3D spots featured at Stewart’s seminar.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16hPBsw2Uy4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJiL-PAMI80&feature=related

Sources:

‘Saw 3D’ Sponsors Site With Girls-in-Bikini Videos
Posted by Andrew Hampp on 10.08.10 @ 02:52 PM 

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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