Oct 27, 2021
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Villeneuve met Coppola, Spielberg at last weekend’s Academy Awards

TORONTO – Quebec filmmaker Denis Villeneuve says he felt welcomed by Hollywood’s luminaries as he walked the red carpet at last weekend’s Academy Awards.

The acclaimed Montreal director said Thursday he was honoured to meet many of the heavyweights he admires, including Michael Mann, Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.

“It was something I will remember all my life, it was a fantastic experience,” Villeneuve said at a news conference where it was announced that he will receive a National Arts Centre award for exceptional achievement over the past year.

“What did touch me the most is that I felt welcome there. I thought it was huge, but at the same time there’s a lot of warmth and I met people that I admire a lot. It was a big gift for me to be there.”

Villeneuve’s wrenching drama “Incendies” was nominated for a best foreign-language Oscar but lost out to Denmark’s “In a Better World.”

Also at the news conference, Gov. Gen. David Johnston named this year’s recipients for the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement, among them film and TV star William Shatner, Oscar-winning composer Howard Shore and Quebec humorist Yvon Deschamps.

Neither Shatner nor Shore were at the announcement Thursday, but Shore said earlier by phone from New York that he was grateful for the honour, considered the ultimate recognition in Canada’s performing arts.

“I’m getting to a certain age, I guess,” said the 64-year-old Shore, who has three Academy Awards for his work on the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy and a lifetime achievement award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

“I’m very appreciative of the recognition…. It’s a wonderful group.”

Shore said he’s currently working on the music for the two-part adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit.”

The Governor General’s awards will be handed out May 13 in Ottawa and be followed by a gala on May 14.

Other honourees include dance artist Margie Gillis, theatrical director Leslee Silverman and theatre pioneer Paul Thompson.

A jovial Deschamps said he only sees a mountain of work when he looks back at his lengthy career, which includes more than 500 performances at Montreal’s Place des Arts.

The 75-year-old entertainer said he has mixed feelings about accepting the accolade, which comes with $25,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and a commemorative medallion.

“When you’ve spent all your life working and not thinking about honours or things like this and then they come to you (I say), ‘Oh yes, you want to give me a medal? Sure, sure!” he says laughing.

“And then you wake up the next day and say, ‘Why did I say yes? I don’t need medals, my work is my work.’ So there are mixed feelings between, ‘Oh, I’m so happy,’ and, ‘I shouldn’t have said yes.”‘

Jean-Andre Elie — a longtime supporter of the Orchestre symphonique de Montreal — is this year’s recipient of the Ramon John Hnatyshyn Award for volunteer work in the performing arts.

Meanwhile, dance legend Evelyn Hart says she will mentor Heather Ogden, principal dancer of the National Ballet of Canada, through the 2011 Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards Mentorship Program. The program allows past recipients of the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award to offer creative guidance to another artist in mid-career.

Villeneuve’s National Arts Centre award also comes with a medallion and $25,000. The 43-year-old director, whose acclaimed body of work includes “Polytechnique,” and “Maelstrom,” described the honour as particularly beautiful and meaningful because it is directly linked to art.

“It was a long process for me to call myself an artist because to be an artist is something that is a huge responsibility,” he said, adding he even finds it difficult to call himself a filmmaker.

“I think that I’m slowly, slowly becoming an artist…. When I present myself I don’t see myself as an artist. I don’t know why it (means) something for me that is too big but one day, maybe when I’m going to be old, I will be able to call myself an artist.”

Past recipients of the performing arts award include Robert Lepage, Robbie Robertson, Kate & Anna McGarrigle and Stompin’ Tom Connors.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

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Front Page, Industry News

Villeneuve met Coppola, Spielberg at last weekend’s Academy Awards

TORONTO – Quebec filmmaker Denis Villeneuve says he felt welcomed by Hollywood’s luminaries as he walked the red carpet at last weekend’s Academy Awards.

The acclaimed Montreal director said Thursday he was honoured to meet many of the heavyweights he admires, including Michael Mann, Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.

“It was something I will remember all my life, it was a fantastic experience,” Villeneuve said at a news conference where it was announced that he will receive a National Arts Centre award for exceptional achievement over the past year.

“What did touch me the most is that I felt welcome there. I thought it was huge, but at the same time there’s a lot of warmth and I met people that I admire a lot. It was a big gift for me to be there.”

Villeneuve’s wrenching drama “Incendies” was nominated for a best foreign-language Oscar but lost out to Denmark’s “In a Better World.”

Also at the news conference, Gov. Gen. David Johnston named this year’s recipients for the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement, among them film and TV star William Shatner, Oscar-winning composer Howard Shore and Quebec humorist Yvon Deschamps.

Neither Shatner nor Shore were at the announcement Thursday, but Shore said earlier by phone from New York that he was grateful for the honour, considered the ultimate recognition in Canada’s performing arts.

“I’m getting to a certain age, I guess,” said the 64-year-old Shore, who has three Academy Awards for his work on the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy and a lifetime achievement award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

“I’m very appreciative of the recognition…. It’s a wonderful group.”

Shore said he’s currently working on the music for the two-part adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit.”

The Governor General’s awards will be handed out May 13 in Ottawa and be followed by a gala on May 14.

Other honourees include dance artist Margie Gillis, theatrical director Leslee Silverman and theatre pioneer Paul Thompson.

A jovial Deschamps said he only sees a mountain of work when he looks back at his lengthy career, which includes more than 500 performances at Montreal’s Place des Arts.

The 75-year-old entertainer said he has mixed feelings about accepting the accolade, which comes with $25,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and a commemorative medallion.

“When you’ve spent all your life working and not thinking about honours or things like this and then they come to you (I say), ‘Oh yes, you want to give me a medal? Sure, sure!” he says laughing.

“And then you wake up the next day and say, ‘Why did I say yes? I don’t need medals, my work is my work.’ So there are mixed feelings between, ‘Oh, I’m so happy,’ and, ‘I shouldn’t have said yes.”‘

Jean-Andre Elie — a longtime supporter of the Orchestre symphonique de Montreal — is this year’s recipient of the Ramon John Hnatyshyn Award for volunteer work in the performing arts.

Meanwhile, dance legend Evelyn Hart says she will mentor Heather Ogden, principal dancer of the National Ballet of Canada, through the 2011 Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards Mentorship Program. The program allows past recipients of the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award to offer creative guidance to another artist in mid-career.

Villeneuve’s National Arts Centre award also comes with a medallion and $25,000. The 43-year-old director, whose acclaimed body of work includes “Polytechnique,” and “Maelstrom,” described the honour as particularly beautiful and meaningful because it is directly linked to art.

“It was a long process for me to call myself an artist because to be an artist is something that is a huge responsibility,” he said, adding he even finds it difficult to call himself a filmmaker.

“I think that I’m slowly, slowly becoming an artist…. When I present myself I don’t see myself as an artist. I don’t know why it (means) something for me that is too big but one day, maybe when I’m going to be old, I will be able to call myself an artist.”

Past recipients of the performing arts award include Robert Lepage, Robbie Robertson, Kate & Anna McGarrigle and Stompin’ Tom Connors.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Villeneuve met Coppola, Spielberg at last weekend’s Academy Awards

TORONTO – Quebec filmmaker Denis Villeneuve says he felt welcomed by Hollywood’s luminaries as he walked the red carpet at last weekend’s Academy Awards.

The acclaimed Montreal director said Thursday he was honoured to meet many of the heavyweights he admires, including Michael Mann, Francis Ford Coppola, Steven Spielberg, and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu.

“It was something I will remember all my life, it was a fantastic experience,” Villeneuve said at a news conference where it was announced that he will receive a National Arts Centre award for exceptional achievement over the past year.

“What did touch me the most is that I felt welcome there. I thought it was huge, but at the same time there’s a lot of warmth and I met people that I admire a lot. It was a big gift for me to be there.”

Villeneuve’s wrenching drama “Incendies” was nominated for a best foreign-language Oscar but lost out to Denmark’s “In a Better World.”

Also at the news conference, Gov. Gen. David Johnston named this year’s recipients for the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Artistic Achievement, among them film and TV star William Shatner, Oscar-winning composer Howard Shore and Quebec humorist Yvon Deschamps.

Neither Shatner nor Shore were at the announcement Thursday, but Shore said earlier by phone from New York that he was grateful for the honour, considered the ultimate recognition in Canada’s performing arts.

“I’m getting to a certain age, I guess,” said the 64-year-old Shore, who has three Academy Awards for his work on the “Lord of the Rings” trilogy and a lifetime achievement award from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers.

“I’m very appreciative of the recognition…. It’s a wonderful group.”

Shore said he’s currently working on the music for the two-part adaptation of J.R.R. Tolkien’s “The Hobbit.”

The Governor General’s awards will be handed out May 13 in Ottawa and be followed by a gala on May 14.

Other honourees include dance artist Margie Gillis, theatrical director Leslee Silverman and theatre pioneer Paul Thompson.

A jovial Deschamps said he only sees a mountain of work when he looks back at his lengthy career, which includes more than 500 performances at Montreal’s Place des Arts.

The 75-year-old entertainer said he has mixed feelings about accepting the accolade, which comes with $25,000 from the Canada Council for the Arts and a commemorative medallion.

“When you’ve spent all your life working and not thinking about honours or things like this and then they come to you (I say), ‘Oh yes, you want to give me a medal? Sure, sure!” he says laughing.

“And then you wake up the next day and say, ‘Why did I say yes? I don’t need medals, my work is my work.’ So there are mixed feelings between, ‘Oh, I’m so happy,’ and, ‘I shouldn’t have said yes.”‘

Jean-Andre Elie — a longtime supporter of the Orchestre symphonique de Montreal — is this year’s recipient of the Ramon John Hnatyshyn Award for volunteer work in the performing arts.

Meanwhile, dance legend Evelyn Hart says she will mentor Heather Ogden, principal dancer of the National Ballet of Canada, through the 2011 Governor General’s Performing Arts Awards Mentorship Program. The program allows past recipients of the Governor General’s Performing Arts Award to offer creative guidance to another artist in mid-career.

Villeneuve’s National Arts Centre award also comes with a medallion and $25,000. The 43-year-old director, whose acclaimed body of work includes “Polytechnique,” and “Maelstrom,” described the honour as particularly beautiful and meaningful because it is directly linked to art.

“It was a long process for me to call myself an artist because to be an artist is something that is a huge responsibility,” he said, adding he even finds it difficult to call himself a filmmaker.

“I think that I’m slowly, slowly becoming an artist…. When I present myself I don’t see myself as an artist. I don’t know why it (means) something for me that is too big but one day, maybe when I’m going to be old, I will be able to call myself an artist.”

Past recipients of the performing arts award include Robert Lepage, Robbie Robertson, Kate & Anna McGarrigle and Stompin’ Tom Connors.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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