Sep 18, 2019
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Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Mass collaboration and conducting a digital worldwide creative department.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Like its founder, Ignacio Oreamuno’s Giant Hydra, the on-line mass creative collaborative is 176 trombones – young, thrilling, wild. It’s energized by creatives (HydraHeads) who are not in it for the big bucks or giant egos, but for the fun of playing out the brief with agencies such as Ogilvy, TAXI, Leo Burnett, TBWA and the creative directors they’d likely not work for under different circumstances. Mass collaboration works in large part because as Tony Chapman, Founder and CEO of Capital C says, ”The benefit is quantity… and a highly efficient price point.” Period. And that makes mass collaboration chump change for some people but perhaps, fun, like a hyper-velocity, social networked digital game. Think ‘IdeaVille.’! 

Giant Hydra is not an advertising agency; it’s a resource for them. However, *Victors & Spoils, is an ad agency (pioneered by former principals of CP+B. in Boulder, Colorado,) actually founded on the principles of crowdsourcing. Victors & Spoils explain their model this way: “Crowdsourcing (mass collaboration) is the act of digitally delegating a task to a group of people that passionately participate in developing a solution. * 

Giant Hydra’s Oreamuno explains the benefits of Giant Hydra this way: “Ad agencies will now be able to tap into a collective and collaborative pool of concept developers that will provide ideas and executions in quantity and quality that could not be matched by traditional in-house teams.” Oreamuno says the model enables “…a TV idea created by someone in Stockholm to be developed into a social media campaign by someone in Buenos Aires and into a viral web (idea) by someone in Seattle… the possibilities are endless.”

Giant Hydra calls these ideas “seeds” and every HydraHead on the project can grab a seed and run with it. “They don’t compete, they collaborate, all working together to accomplish a specific goal or task,” says Oreamuno. The Brief thinks – Chairman Mao where art thou? 

Who knew the process of creativity, once so dependent on that inexplicable alchemy between AD and CW is so passe? Andrew Simon, Chief Creative Officer of Blammo Worldwide (GJP’s reincarnation,) unctions over Giant Hydra and warns of the fundamental change in the industry that cannot be ignored. The Brief asked Simon to expound on armageddon. He said, “The walls, they are a tumblin’ down. As an industry we have to be open to new possibilities and more collaboration. New organizational structures. New ways of pairing talent, and for that matter, finding different kinds of talent. Today we need broad-based thinkers who are comfortable creating ideas in all mediums. And we need to put aside the bias that traditionally trained ad people are the best at coming up with solutions. Put aside the politics and let the best idea(s) win.” Did you hear that Miami Ad School? Perhaps the guys across the street at Java Junction have the real solution. Hey, they have an iPad!

The Brief asked Andrew Simon whether he believed Giant Hydra exists because these are hard times and people are hungry for opportunity. He said, “Just like Victor & Spoils, Giant Hydra exists because we all need to find new ways to come up with the most compelling ideas.” So we’re hungry for ideas. Masses and more of them.

The Brief is thinking that what’s truly new is that agencies are complicit in confusing the client. The client is understandably desperate (in these times) to hold onto share and build the brand, the agency is co-dependent and throwing everything they can think of into the gumbo. Maybe this will work? So many ideas. So many platforms. So much ado about nothing when you consider how mean-spirited the “good idea” muse behaves despite the mass assistance.

Robert Chandler, Creative Director, owner of General Levitation, who was CD at L.A.’s Chiat/Day, BBDO, and Ogilvy, qualifies to throw his opinion into the mix because he was also creative director on Apple, Microsoft, and IBM. He’s the original digital dude. Chandler says about the state of current advertising: “It looks like the worst throwaways of Slacker Nation. More crude excretion humor than a Judd Apatow movie. There’s one spot running now where a guy is getting a proctology exam as he talks to us about whatever the hell he’s selling.”

The Brief asks Chandler why, with all the creative resources, the work sucks? He says, “The downside, is the downside of how we are now working generally:
you’ve got a lot of people sitting alone in their pods, working virtually. They do their bit and email it in or upload it on an FTP. There is a minimum of human interaction. No true human collaboration,” Chandler concludes. “It’s better to have a lot of great people working under one roof. (Together) there is all sorts of unspoken communication and spreading of ideas that we don’t fully understand.”

The Brief believes this: despite quantity, mass collaboration is a lot like sexting. It does the job, but it won’t give you an orgasm.

Next week The Brief will report on the state of freelancing, with mass collaboration and otherwise. Hint: hold onto your job (if you can) and postpone having the baby.

Click this link and sing along with David Bowie to changes.

The Brief would like to acknowledge its sources

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

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Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Mass collaboration and conducting a digital worldwide creative department.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Like its founder, Ignacio Oreamuno’s Giant Hydra, the on-line mass creative collaborative is 176 trombones – young, thrilling, wild. It’s energized by creatives (HydraHeads) who are not in it for the big bucks or giant egos, but for the fun of playing out the brief with agencies such as Ogilvy, TAXI, Leo Burnett, TBWA and the creative directors they’d likely not work for under different circumstances. Mass collaboration works in large part because as Tony Chapman, Founder and CEO of Capital C says, ”The benefit is quantity… and a highly efficient price point.” Period. And that makes mass collaboration chump change for some people but perhaps, fun, like a hyper-velocity, social networked digital game. Think ‘IdeaVille.’! 

Giant Hydra is not an advertising agency; it’s a resource for them. However, *Victors & Spoils, is an ad agency (pioneered by former principals of CP+B. in Boulder, Colorado,) actually founded on the principles of crowdsourcing. Victors & Spoils explain their model this way: “Crowdsourcing (mass collaboration) is the act of digitally delegating a task to a group of people that passionately participate in developing a solution. * 

Giant Hydra’s Oreamuno explains the benefits of Giant Hydra this way: “Ad agencies will now be able to tap into a collective and collaborative pool of concept developers that will provide ideas and executions in quantity and quality that could not be matched by traditional in-house teams.” Oreamuno says the model enables “…a TV idea created by someone in Stockholm to be developed into a social media campaign by someone in Buenos Aires and into a viral web (idea) by someone in Seattle… the possibilities are endless.”

Giant Hydra calls these ideas “seeds” and every HydraHead on the project can grab a seed and run with it. “They don’t compete, they collaborate, all working together to accomplish a specific goal or task,” says Oreamuno. The Brief thinks – Chairman Mao where art thou? 

Who knew the process of creativity, once so dependent on that inexplicable alchemy between AD and CW is so passe? Andrew Simon, Chief Creative Officer of Blammo Worldwide (GJP’s reincarnation,) unctions over Giant Hydra and warns of the fundamental change in the industry that cannot be ignored. The Brief asked Simon to expound on armageddon. He said, “The walls, they are a tumblin’ down. As an industry we have to be open to new possibilities and more collaboration. New organizational structures. New ways of pairing talent, and for that matter, finding different kinds of talent. Today we need broad-based thinkers who are comfortable creating ideas in all mediums. And we need to put aside the bias that traditionally trained ad people are the best at coming up with solutions. Put aside the politics and let the best idea(s) win.” Did you hear that Miami Ad School? Perhaps the guys across the street at Java Junction have the real solution. Hey, they have an iPad!

The Brief asked Andrew Simon whether he believed Giant Hydra exists because these are hard times and people are hungry for opportunity. He said, “Just like Victor & Spoils, Giant Hydra exists because we all need to find new ways to come up with the most compelling ideas.” So we’re hungry for ideas. Masses and more of them.

The Brief is thinking that what’s truly new is that agencies are complicit in confusing the client. The client is understandably desperate (in these times) to hold onto share and build the brand, the agency is co-dependent and throwing everything they can think of into the gumbo. Maybe this will work? So many ideas. So many platforms. So much ado about nothing when you consider how mean-spirited the “good idea” muse behaves despite the mass assistance.

Robert Chandler, Creative Director, owner of General Levitation, who was CD at L.A.’s Chiat/Day, BBDO, and Ogilvy, qualifies to throw his opinion into the mix because he was also creative director on Apple, Microsoft, and IBM. He’s the original digital dude. Chandler says about the state of current advertising: “It looks like the worst throwaways of Slacker Nation. More crude excretion humor than a Judd Apatow movie. There’s one spot running now where a guy is getting a proctology exam as he talks to us about whatever the hell he’s selling.”

The Brief asks Chandler why, with all the creative resources, the work sucks? He says, “The downside, is the downside of how we are now working generally:
you’ve got a lot of people sitting alone in their pods, working virtually. They do their bit and email it in or upload it on an FTP. There is a minimum of human interaction. No true human collaboration,” Chandler concludes. “It’s better to have a lot of great people working under one roof. (Together) there is all sorts of unspoken communication and spreading of ideas that we don’t fully understand.”

The Brief believes this: despite quantity, mass collaboration is a lot like sexting. It does the job, but it won’t give you an orgasm.

Next week The Brief will report on the state of freelancing, with mass collaboration and otherwise. Hint: hold onto your job (if you can) and postpone having the baby.

Click this link and sing along with David Bowie to changes.

The Brief would like to acknowledge its sources

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Mass collaboration and conducting a digital worldwide creative department.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Like its founder, Ignacio Oreamuno’s Giant Hydra, the on-line mass creative collaborative is 176 trombones – young, thrilling, wild. It’s energized by creatives (HydraHeads) who are not in it for the big bucks or giant egos, but for the fun of playing out the brief with agencies such as Ogilvy, TAXI, Leo Burnett, TBWA and the creative directors they’d likely not work for under different circumstances. Mass collaboration works in large part because as Tony Chapman, Founder and CEO of Capital C says, ”The benefit is quantity… and a highly efficient price point.” Period. And that makes mass collaboration chump change for some people but perhaps, fun, like a hyper-velocity, social networked digital game. Think ‘IdeaVille.’! 

Giant Hydra is not an advertising agency; it’s a resource for them. However, *Victors & Spoils, is an ad agency (pioneered by former principals of CP+B. in Boulder, Colorado,) actually founded on the principles of crowdsourcing. Victors & Spoils explain their model this way: “Crowdsourcing (mass collaboration) is the act of digitally delegating a task to a group of people that passionately participate in developing a solution. * 

Giant Hydra’s Oreamuno explains the benefits of Giant Hydra this way: “Ad agencies will now be able to tap into a collective and collaborative pool of concept developers that will provide ideas and executions in quantity and quality that could not be matched by traditional in-house teams.” Oreamuno says the model enables “…a TV idea created by someone in Stockholm to be developed into a social media campaign by someone in Buenos Aires and into a viral web (idea) by someone in Seattle… the possibilities are endless.”

Giant Hydra calls these ideas “seeds” and every HydraHead on the project can grab a seed and run with it. “They don’t compete, they collaborate, all working together to accomplish a specific goal or task,” says Oreamuno. The Brief thinks – Chairman Mao where art thou? 

Who knew the process of creativity, once so dependent on that inexplicable alchemy between AD and CW is so passe? Andrew Simon, Chief Creative Officer of Blammo Worldwide (GJP’s reincarnation,) unctions over Giant Hydra and warns of the fundamental change in the industry that cannot be ignored. The Brief asked Simon to expound on armageddon. He said, “The walls, they are a tumblin’ down. As an industry we have to be open to new possibilities and more collaboration. New organizational structures. New ways of pairing talent, and for that matter, finding different kinds of talent. Today we need broad-based thinkers who are comfortable creating ideas in all mediums. And we need to put aside the bias that traditionally trained ad people are the best at coming up with solutions. Put aside the politics and let the best idea(s) win.” Did you hear that Miami Ad School? Perhaps the guys across the street at Java Junction have the real solution. Hey, they have an iPad!

The Brief asked Andrew Simon whether he believed Giant Hydra exists because these are hard times and people are hungry for opportunity. He said, “Just like Victor & Spoils, Giant Hydra exists because we all need to find new ways to come up with the most compelling ideas.” So we’re hungry for ideas. Masses and more of them.

The Brief is thinking that what’s truly new is that agencies are complicit in confusing the client. The client is understandably desperate (in these times) to hold onto share and build the brand, the agency is co-dependent and throwing everything they can think of into the gumbo. Maybe this will work? So many ideas. So many platforms. So much ado about nothing when you consider how mean-spirited the “good idea” muse behaves despite the mass assistance.

Robert Chandler, Creative Director, owner of General Levitation, who was CD at L.A.’s Chiat/Day, BBDO, and Ogilvy, qualifies to throw his opinion into the mix because he was also creative director on Apple, Microsoft, and IBM. He’s the original digital dude. Chandler says about the state of current advertising: “It looks like the worst throwaways of Slacker Nation. More crude excretion humor than a Judd Apatow movie. There’s one spot running now where a guy is getting a proctology exam as he talks to us about whatever the hell he’s selling.”

The Brief asks Chandler why, with all the creative resources, the work sucks? He says, “The downside, is the downside of how we are now working generally:
you’ve got a lot of people sitting alone in their pods, working virtually. They do their bit and email it in or upload it on an FTP. There is a minimum of human interaction. No true human collaboration,” Chandler concludes. “It’s better to have a lot of great people working under one roof. (Together) there is all sorts of unspoken communication and spreading of ideas that we don’t fully understand.”

The Brief believes this: despite quantity, mass collaboration is a lot like sexting. It does the job, but it won’t give you an orgasm.

Next week The Brief will report on the state of freelancing, with mass collaboration and otherwise. Hint: hold onto your job (if you can) and postpone having the baby.

Click this link and sing along with David Bowie to changes.

The Brief would like to acknowledge its sources

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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