Sep 22, 2019
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Front Page, Industry News

Final Cut Pro X

By Danny F. Santos
TO411Daily Technical Writer

We are still weeks away from the release of Apple’s new non-linear editor, now billed Final Cut Pro X. Because no one has actually had a hands on experience with this preview version, it’s hard to state whether this release is revolutionary or just a much needed upgrade.

From the preview at the Supermeet, where it was officially unveiled, we know some tantalizing details. The new FCP has been built from the ground up and is now a 64bit program, able to use all available processing cores. It also has new features such as the ability to mix separate video formats without transcoding, magnetic timelines and advanced colour correction. However, none of these new features are truly new as they’ve been available on other platforms, in some cases for the last few years.

There are a few new exciting features found on the new FCP, one click colour matching and the ability to ingest footage in the background. Also, some of the big gripes with the Final Cut line have finally been addressed such as background rendering and the ability to use more than 4GB of RAM.

The interface is also very reminiscent of iMovie. Like it’s younger sibling, it has a filmstrip instead of a viewer creating a different way for pro editors to do their work. It seems as if Apple has streamlined it’s user interface and tried to make it more intuitive for those who use iMovie instead of making it more intuitive to those who have grown up on a steady diet of Avid, FCP and Premiere. They’re looking to change an editor’s workflow, possibly for the better as more and more editing work is for online content.

There is one absolutely revolutionary aspect to Final Cut Pro X, however, it’s price. At just $299, it’s much cheaper than most other NLEs available. Final Cut Pro X will be available exclusively from the Mac App store in June.

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Front Page, Industry News

Final Cut Pro X

By Danny F. Santos
TO411Daily Technical Writer

We are still weeks away from the release of Apple’s new non-linear editor, now billed Final Cut Pro X. Because no one has actually had a hands on experience with this preview version, it’s hard to state whether this release is revolutionary or just a much needed upgrade.

From the preview at the Supermeet, where it was officially unveiled, we know some tantalizing details. The new FCP has been built from the ground up and is now a 64bit program, able to use all available processing cores. It also has new features such as the ability to mix separate video formats without transcoding, magnetic timelines and advanced colour correction. However, none of these new features are truly new as they’ve been available on other platforms, in some cases for the last few years.

There are a few new exciting features found on the new FCP, one click colour matching and the ability to ingest footage in the background. Also, some of the big gripes with the Final Cut line have finally been addressed such as background rendering and the ability to use more than 4GB of RAM.

The interface is also very reminiscent of iMovie. Like it’s younger sibling, it has a filmstrip instead of a viewer creating a different way for pro editors to do their work. It seems as if Apple has streamlined it’s user interface and tried to make it more intuitive for those who use iMovie instead of making it more intuitive to those who have grown up on a steady diet of Avid, FCP and Premiere. They’re looking to change an editor’s workflow, possibly for the better as more and more editing work is for online content.

There is one absolutely revolutionary aspect to Final Cut Pro X, however, it’s price. At just $299, it’s much cheaper than most other NLEs available. Final Cut Pro X will be available exclusively from the Mac App store in June.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Final Cut Pro X

By Danny F. Santos
TO411Daily Technical Writer

We are still weeks away from the release of Apple’s new non-linear editor, now billed Final Cut Pro X. Because no one has actually had a hands on experience with this preview version, it’s hard to state whether this release is revolutionary or just a much needed upgrade.

From the preview at the Supermeet, where it was officially unveiled, we know some tantalizing details. The new FCP has been built from the ground up and is now a 64bit program, able to use all available processing cores. It also has new features such as the ability to mix separate video formats without transcoding, magnetic timelines and advanced colour correction. However, none of these new features are truly new as they’ve been available on other platforms, in some cases for the last few years.

There are a few new exciting features found on the new FCP, one click colour matching and the ability to ingest footage in the background. Also, some of the big gripes with the Final Cut line have finally been addressed such as background rendering and the ability to use more than 4GB of RAM.

The interface is also very reminiscent of iMovie. Like it’s younger sibling, it has a filmstrip instead of a viewer creating a different way for pro editors to do their work. It seems as if Apple has streamlined it’s user interface and tried to make it more intuitive for those who use iMovie instead of making it more intuitive to those who have grown up on a steady diet of Avid, FCP and Premiere. They’re looking to change an editor’s workflow, possibly for the better as more and more editing work is for online content.

There is one absolutely revolutionary aspect to Final Cut Pro X, however, it’s price. At just $299, it’s much cheaper than most other NLEs available. Final Cut Pro X will be available exclusively from the Mac App store in June.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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