Oct 24, 2021
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The Sound of Exploration: the challenge of documentary sound – Part 2

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

A continuation of our interview with Mark Terry, Director, Writer and Producer of The Polar Explorer, and his post production sound team Pino Halili, owner and manager of Post City Sound, and Allen Ormerod, co-owner and main re-recording engineer. Read part 1 here.

Pino: The film does have certain paces. There’s a lot of action at the beginning to lead you in and then it goes through various different degrees of emotion. Different elements of music come in to accentuate that and everything has to support what we’re seeing, not only visually but as far as the narrative goes. There are a lot of different degrees of emotion that we are traveling on, especially at the end with COP16.

This film had an impact on COP16, didn’t it?

Mark: The film I made last year (The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning) was the only kind of documentation of polar research done in Antarctica available to the delegates, and this was very current too, we had just gotten back from there, so they wanted this information to know what was going on so they could make international police if necessary. So we made the point that sea level rise is happening faster than anybody thought and at the time, in Copenhagen they came up with a resolution calling for some kind of coastal protection. But it didn’t reach the final accord because the economic factors were not considered, they didn’t know how much it was going to be to protect these coastal communities – How much are the flood defenses? How much are the relocation expenses? Because that analysis wasn’t done yet, they took it out. They didn’t want to commit to something they might not be able to afford. A lot of these Low lying communities don’t necessarily have the funds available to pull off something like that and then that would fall back on the richer nations.

This year we went to the Arctic as well as the Antarctic, and once again our timing was very good, in that we came back at the end of October with this new information and the conference started at the end of November, so they said come back down here again and we presented. 

They saw the big ice chunks, which we didn’t have a problem with last year, but now we do, so the urgency really escalated and they were able to introduce the resolution. Its called the Enhanced Action on Adaptation, section 2, sub-section 25. That resolution is based on the information we provided in this film. Now of course we didn’t have the film finished then, we put together basically a highlight reel. We put all the good stuff in there and kind of slammed it together quickly and that’s what we presented, about 45 minutes, but it was good because we didn’t have a lot of narrative manipulation in there, it was just: here are the facts.

What is happening to the sea levels?

Mark: It’s being monitored daily and it changes everyday too, because in addition to a gradual increase that we’re seeing, there is also the occasional period of time where it actually goes down. That’s just a natural occurrence in the flow of the earth, but what we are concerned about is the fact that the gradual increase is being compounded by chunks of ice that are now breaking off. This didn’t happen before. Glacial collapse was very rare in the early days of global warming because the ice was simply melting and trickling drips of water into the world seas. The reason it’s changing now is because tons of those glaciers have receded and the rock underneath is now exposed. And now that the rock of the shores that the glaciers are on are exposed, the sun hits it and heats the rock. You ever put your hand on the road in the summer, feel how hot the stone is? Well that carries the heat underneath. It’s called an endothermic reaction. It carries the heat under the ice and melts it from underneath as well as on top. And so when you get that crack [in the Glacier] it just literally slides down like a water slide. And so that is a huge additional increase in volume instantly not gradually.

Two months before it happened, when I’m addressing the UN you hear me talk about Tsunamis coming. It’s actually in the film. I don’t want to be a harbinger, but what the scientists explained to me is that when you have these large sudden contributions of fresh water into the world seas, it creates an extra density in weight on the oceanic fault lines that are on the sea bed of the oceans. That happens instantly. So pressure of the water puts pressure on the fault and then an earthquake happens and the earthquake itself sucks in the water and causes a tsunami. So that was one of the greatest concerns the scientists have is that its not just rising sea levels and flooding. And what happened in Japan, a lot of scientists believe, are directly related to the glacier collapse in Christchurch in New Zealand, because that was a similar huge chunk of ice that fell into the ocean and followed the fault line to Japan. It wiped out most of Christchurch. Pine Island glacier is the largest ice ranged basin in the world and that thing is about to break in half. It’s about the size of the state of Connecticut, not the whole thing, just the piece that they expect to collapse any second now.


Today, Mark is one of only 166 Canadian members of the prestigious Explorers’ Club, a 104- year-old organization comprised of the world’s greatest explorers and you will be able to learn more fascinating facts about our rapidly-changing poles presented for the first time in The Polar Explorer, when its finished, on CBC.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

The Sound of Exploration: the challenge of documentary sound – Part 2

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

A continuation of our interview with Mark Terry, Director, Writer and Producer of The Polar Explorer, and his post production sound team Pino Halili, owner and manager of Post City Sound, and Allen Ormerod, co-owner and main re-recording engineer. Read part 1 here.

Pino: The film does have certain paces. There’s a lot of action at the beginning to lead you in and then it goes through various different degrees of emotion. Different elements of music come in to accentuate that and everything has to support what we’re seeing, not only visually but as far as the narrative goes. There are a lot of different degrees of emotion that we are traveling on, especially at the end with COP16.

This film had an impact on COP16, didn’t it?

Mark: The film I made last year (The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning) was the only kind of documentation of polar research done in Antarctica available to the delegates, and this was very current too, we had just gotten back from there, so they wanted this information to know what was going on so they could make international police if necessary. So we made the point that sea level rise is happening faster than anybody thought and at the time, in Copenhagen they came up with a resolution calling for some kind of coastal protection. But it didn’t reach the final accord because the economic factors were not considered, they didn’t know how much it was going to be to protect these coastal communities – How much are the flood defenses? How much are the relocation expenses? Because that analysis wasn’t done yet, they took it out. They didn’t want to commit to something they might not be able to afford. A lot of these Low lying communities don’t necessarily have the funds available to pull off something like that and then that would fall back on the richer nations.

This year we went to the Arctic as well as the Antarctic, and once again our timing was very good, in that we came back at the end of October with this new information and the conference started at the end of November, so they said come back down here again and we presented. 

They saw the big ice chunks, which we didn’t have a problem with last year, but now we do, so the urgency really escalated and they were able to introduce the resolution. Its called the Enhanced Action on Adaptation, section 2, sub-section 25. That resolution is based on the information we provided in this film. Now of course we didn’t have the film finished then, we put together basically a highlight reel. We put all the good stuff in there and kind of slammed it together quickly and that’s what we presented, about 45 minutes, but it was good because we didn’t have a lot of narrative manipulation in there, it was just: here are the facts.

What is happening to the sea levels?

Mark: It’s being monitored daily and it changes everyday too, because in addition to a gradual increase that we’re seeing, there is also the occasional period of time where it actually goes down. That’s just a natural occurrence in the flow of the earth, but what we are concerned about is the fact that the gradual increase is being compounded by chunks of ice that are now breaking off. This didn’t happen before. Glacial collapse was very rare in the early days of global warming because the ice was simply melting and trickling drips of water into the world seas. The reason it’s changing now is because tons of those glaciers have receded and the rock underneath is now exposed. And now that the rock of the shores that the glaciers are on are exposed, the sun hits it and heats the rock. You ever put your hand on the road in the summer, feel how hot the stone is? Well that carries the heat underneath. It’s called an endothermic reaction. It carries the heat under the ice and melts it from underneath as well as on top. And so when you get that crack [in the Glacier] it just literally slides down like a water slide. And so that is a huge additional increase in volume instantly not gradually.

Two months before it happened, when I’m addressing the UN you hear me talk about Tsunamis coming. It’s actually in the film. I don’t want to be a harbinger, but what the scientists explained to me is that when you have these large sudden contributions of fresh water into the world seas, it creates an extra density in weight on the oceanic fault lines that are on the sea bed of the oceans. That happens instantly. So pressure of the water puts pressure on the fault and then an earthquake happens and the earthquake itself sucks in the water and causes a tsunami. So that was one of the greatest concerns the scientists have is that its not just rising sea levels and flooding. And what happened in Japan, a lot of scientists believe, are directly related to the glacier collapse in Christchurch in New Zealand, because that was a similar huge chunk of ice that fell into the ocean and followed the fault line to Japan. It wiped out most of Christchurch. Pine Island glacier is the largest ice ranged basin in the world and that thing is about to break in half. It’s about the size of the state of Connecticut, not the whole thing, just the piece that they expect to collapse any second now.


Today, Mark is one of only 166 Canadian members of the prestigious Explorers’ Club, a 104- year-old organization comprised of the world’s greatest explorers and you will be able to learn more fascinating facts about our rapidly-changing poles presented for the first time in The Polar Explorer, when its finished, on CBC.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

The Sound of Exploration: the challenge of documentary sound – Part 2

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

A continuation of our interview with Mark Terry, Director, Writer and Producer of The Polar Explorer, and his post production sound team Pino Halili, owner and manager of Post City Sound, and Allen Ormerod, co-owner and main re-recording engineer. Read part 1 here.

Pino: The film does have certain paces. There’s a lot of action at the beginning to lead you in and then it goes through various different degrees of emotion. Different elements of music come in to accentuate that and everything has to support what we’re seeing, not only visually but as far as the narrative goes. There are a lot of different degrees of emotion that we are traveling on, especially at the end with COP16.

This film had an impact on COP16, didn’t it?

Mark: The film I made last year (The Antarctica Challenge: A Global Warning) was the only kind of documentation of polar research done in Antarctica available to the delegates, and this was very current too, we had just gotten back from there, so they wanted this information to know what was going on so they could make international police if necessary. So we made the point that sea level rise is happening faster than anybody thought and at the time, in Copenhagen they came up with a resolution calling for some kind of coastal protection. But it didn’t reach the final accord because the economic factors were not considered, they didn’t know how much it was going to be to protect these coastal communities – How much are the flood defenses? How much are the relocation expenses? Because that analysis wasn’t done yet, they took it out. They didn’t want to commit to something they might not be able to afford. A lot of these Low lying communities don’t necessarily have the funds available to pull off something like that and then that would fall back on the richer nations.

This year we went to the Arctic as well as the Antarctic, and once again our timing was very good, in that we came back at the end of October with this new information and the conference started at the end of November, so they said come back down here again and we presented. 

They saw the big ice chunks, which we didn’t have a problem with last year, but now we do, so the urgency really escalated and they were able to introduce the resolution. Its called the Enhanced Action on Adaptation, section 2, sub-section 25. That resolution is based on the information we provided in this film. Now of course we didn’t have the film finished then, we put together basically a highlight reel. We put all the good stuff in there and kind of slammed it together quickly and that’s what we presented, about 45 minutes, but it was good because we didn’t have a lot of narrative manipulation in there, it was just: here are the facts.

What is happening to the sea levels?

Mark: It’s being monitored daily and it changes everyday too, because in addition to a gradual increase that we’re seeing, there is also the occasional period of time where it actually goes down. That’s just a natural occurrence in the flow of the earth, but what we are concerned about is the fact that the gradual increase is being compounded by chunks of ice that are now breaking off. This didn’t happen before. Glacial collapse was very rare in the early days of global warming because the ice was simply melting and trickling drips of water into the world seas. The reason it’s changing now is because tons of those glaciers have receded and the rock underneath is now exposed. And now that the rock of the shores that the glaciers are on are exposed, the sun hits it and heats the rock. You ever put your hand on the road in the summer, feel how hot the stone is? Well that carries the heat underneath. It’s called an endothermic reaction. It carries the heat under the ice and melts it from underneath as well as on top. And so when you get that crack [in the Glacier] it just literally slides down like a water slide. And so that is a huge additional increase in volume instantly not gradually.

Two months before it happened, when I’m addressing the UN you hear me talk about Tsunamis coming. It’s actually in the film. I don’t want to be a harbinger, but what the scientists explained to me is that when you have these large sudden contributions of fresh water into the world seas, it creates an extra density in weight on the oceanic fault lines that are on the sea bed of the oceans. That happens instantly. So pressure of the water puts pressure on the fault and then an earthquake happens and the earthquake itself sucks in the water and causes a tsunami. So that was one of the greatest concerns the scientists have is that its not just rising sea levels and flooding. And what happened in Japan, a lot of scientists believe, are directly related to the glacier collapse in Christchurch in New Zealand, because that was a similar huge chunk of ice that fell into the ocean and followed the fault line to Japan. It wiped out most of Christchurch. Pine Island glacier is the largest ice ranged basin in the world and that thing is about to break in half. It’s about the size of the state of Connecticut, not the whole thing, just the piece that they expect to collapse any second now.


Today, Mark is one of only 166 Canadian members of the prestigious Explorers’ Club, a 104- year-old organization comprised of the world’s greatest explorers and you will be able to learn more fascinating facts about our rapidly-changing poles presented for the first time in The Polar Explorer, when its finished, on CBC.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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