May 17, 2021
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A final roundup of this year’s CFC Worldwide Short Film Festival

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

Now in its 17th year, the Canadian Film Centre’s Worldwide Short Film Festival is the leading venue for the exhibition and promotion of short films in North America and is one of the premier short film festivals in the world. This year, the festival presented 275 films from 36 countries divided into easily accessible categories like Bromance, Slap ‘n’ Tickle and Creepy. While the entertainment and production value of the shorts can vary wildly in each program, the festival does offer one of the largest prize packages for short films in the world, and top WSFF winners are eligible for both the Academy Award (one of only four Canadian festivals accredited by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) and Genie Award consideration. The WSFF Short Films, BIG IDEAS Symposium offers renowned professional development for attendees, while the WSFF Business Centre is home to the largest short film marketplace in North America.

While a few of the selections would make anyone question the sanity and taste of the programmer, most of the films at the festival are a genuinely sumptuous cross section of the burgeoning creative talent throughout the world that we look forward to seeing more of in the future. The delightfully nostalgic viral video PIXELS made an appearance at the festival, opening its “Out There sci-fi program. New York City comes under attack by 8-bit invaders escaped from 80s arcade games. Amusing and skillfully executed with animation by Patrick Jean. Also worth mentioning was an equally amusing and well-shot film by Anthony Vouardoux, Yuri Lennon’s “Landing On Alpha 46,” which chronicled the investigation of a signal coming from unknown planet A46 and has some particularly appropriate and well-placed curse words.

This year’s Telus Audience Choice Award (cash prize of $5,000) went to “The Gruffalo”, directed by Jakob Schuh and Max Lang (UK, Germany). Based on the classic picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler, this Academy Award nominated animation tells the charming tale of a small mouse who concocts a ghastly creature known as The Gruffalo in order to hoodwink his predators. The short features the voices of Helen Bonham Carter and Robbie Coltrane and the quality of the animation work is a treat.

The Best Animated Short award (and Academy Award eligibility) went to Iain Gardner for “The Tannery” (UK). After their earthly lives are over, these forest friends and foes discover new and surprising fates await them in the afterlife. Gorgeous colour and style meets a soulful story in this rather bleak animated gem. The jury remarked: “This lovely parable about the mysteries of the cycle of life is as beautiful as it is touching. I believe this is a film that will stay with you long after viewing.”

The Deluxe Award for Best Live Action Short was awarded to Rudi Rosenberg’s “Aglaee” (France), garnering $2,500 in cash and eligibility for next year’s Academy Awards. Aglaee, a young girl with cerebral palsy, isn’t interested when Benoit asks her out, but upon discovering it was as a result of losing a bet, the tables begin to turn. An engrossing commentary on youth culture and power dynamics. The performances are natural and the story is disquieting and persuasive in its exploration of both the ugliness and beauty present in the teenage world.

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Headline, Industry News

A final roundup of this year’s CFC Worldwide Short Film Festival

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

Now in its 17th year, the Canadian Film Centre’s Worldwide Short Film Festival is the leading venue for the exhibition and promotion of short films in North America and is one of the premier short film festivals in the world. This year, the festival presented 275 films from 36 countries divided into easily accessible categories like Bromance, Slap ‘n’ Tickle and Creepy. While the entertainment and production value of the shorts can vary wildly in each program, the festival does offer one of the largest prize packages for short films in the world, and top WSFF winners are eligible for both the Academy Award (one of only four Canadian festivals accredited by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) and Genie Award consideration. The WSFF Short Films, BIG IDEAS Symposium offers renowned professional development for attendees, while the WSFF Business Centre is home to the largest short film marketplace in North America.

While a few of the selections would make anyone question the sanity and taste of the programmer, most of the films at the festival are a genuinely sumptuous cross section of the burgeoning creative talent throughout the world that we look forward to seeing more of in the future. The delightfully nostalgic viral video PIXELS made an appearance at the festival, opening its “Out There sci-fi program. New York City comes under attack by 8-bit invaders escaped from 80s arcade games. Amusing and skillfully executed with animation by Patrick Jean. Also worth mentioning was an equally amusing and well-shot film by Anthony Vouardoux, Yuri Lennon’s “Landing On Alpha 46,” which chronicled the investigation of a signal coming from unknown planet A46 and has some particularly appropriate and well-placed curse words.

This year’s Telus Audience Choice Award (cash prize of $5,000) went to “The Gruffalo”, directed by Jakob Schuh and Max Lang (UK, Germany). Based on the classic picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler, this Academy Award nominated animation tells the charming tale of a small mouse who concocts a ghastly creature known as The Gruffalo in order to hoodwink his predators. The short features the voices of Helen Bonham Carter and Robbie Coltrane and the quality of the animation work is a treat.

The Best Animated Short award (and Academy Award eligibility) went to Iain Gardner for “The Tannery” (UK). After their earthly lives are over, these forest friends and foes discover new and surprising fates await them in the afterlife. Gorgeous colour and style meets a soulful story in this rather bleak animated gem. The jury remarked: “This lovely parable about the mysteries of the cycle of life is as beautiful as it is touching. I believe this is a film that will stay with you long after viewing.”

The Deluxe Award for Best Live Action Short was awarded to Rudi Rosenberg’s “Aglaee” (France), garnering $2,500 in cash and eligibility for next year’s Academy Awards. Aglaee, a young girl with cerebral palsy, isn’t interested when Benoit asks her out, but upon discovering it was as a result of losing a bet, the tables begin to turn. An engrossing commentary on youth culture and power dynamics. The performances are natural and the story is disquieting and persuasive in its exploration of both the ugliness and beauty present in the teenage world.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Headline, Industry News

A final roundup of this year’s CFC Worldwide Short Film Festival

By TO411 staff writer Daisy Maclean

Now in its 17th year, the Canadian Film Centre’s Worldwide Short Film Festival is the leading venue for the exhibition and promotion of short films in North America and is one of the premier short film festivals in the world. This year, the festival presented 275 films from 36 countries divided into easily accessible categories like Bromance, Slap ‘n’ Tickle and Creepy. While the entertainment and production value of the shorts can vary wildly in each program, the festival does offer one of the largest prize packages for short films in the world, and top WSFF winners are eligible for both the Academy Award (one of only four Canadian festivals accredited by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences) and Genie Award consideration. The WSFF Short Films, BIG IDEAS Symposium offers renowned professional development for attendees, while the WSFF Business Centre is home to the largest short film marketplace in North America.

While a few of the selections would make anyone question the sanity and taste of the programmer, most of the films at the festival are a genuinely sumptuous cross section of the burgeoning creative talent throughout the world that we look forward to seeing more of in the future. The delightfully nostalgic viral video PIXELS made an appearance at the festival, opening its “Out There sci-fi program. New York City comes under attack by 8-bit invaders escaped from 80s arcade games. Amusing and skillfully executed with animation by Patrick Jean. Also worth mentioning was an equally amusing and well-shot film by Anthony Vouardoux, Yuri Lennon’s “Landing On Alpha 46,” which chronicled the investigation of a signal coming from unknown planet A46 and has some particularly appropriate and well-placed curse words.

This year’s Telus Audience Choice Award (cash prize of $5,000) went to “The Gruffalo”, directed by Jakob Schuh and Max Lang (UK, Germany). Based on the classic picture book by Julia Donaldson and Axel Scheffler, this Academy Award nominated animation tells the charming tale of a small mouse who concocts a ghastly creature known as The Gruffalo in order to hoodwink his predators. The short features the voices of Helen Bonham Carter and Robbie Coltrane and the quality of the animation work is a treat.

The Best Animated Short award (and Academy Award eligibility) went to Iain Gardner for “The Tannery” (UK). After their earthly lives are over, these forest friends and foes discover new and surprising fates await them in the afterlife. Gorgeous colour and style meets a soulful story in this rather bleak animated gem. The jury remarked: “This lovely parable about the mysteries of the cycle of life is as beautiful as it is touching. I believe this is a film that will stay with you long after viewing.”

The Deluxe Award for Best Live Action Short was awarded to Rudi Rosenberg’s “Aglaee” (France), garnering $2,500 in cash and eligibility for next year’s Academy Awards. Aglaee, a young girl with cerebral palsy, isn’t interested when Benoit asks her out, but upon discovering it was as a result of losing a bet, the tables begin to turn. An engrossing commentary on youth culture and power dynamics. The performances are natural and the story is disquieting and persuasive in its exploration of both the ugliness and beauty present in the teenage world.

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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