Apr 12, 2021
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Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Music Production – you deserve a break today.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Music anchors private moments in our life. Like a photograph but with keener focus. Who can forget the perfect coupling of Gershwin and Gene Hackman for Continental Airlines? Or, more recently Feist for Apple? Or, back again, McDonald’s brilliantly insightful “You Deserve a Break Today.”

Advertisers try their best to find just the right music to invoke your life into their brand and vice verse. It’s a request for enchantment. For intuition. And we’ll find out why it’s difficult for a client to make up their mind and more. 

For answers to this, The Brief turned to a quartet of commercial music pros. Brendan Quinn, composer/director at Pirate Toronto; Creighton Doane and Danny LeBlanc, owners, composers, directors, musicians at Doane LeBlanc; Steve Convery, audio producer/director at Tattoo Sound + Music; and Dave Sorbara, owner, composer, music director at Grayson Matthews. 

For clarity’s sake, The Brief substituted production companies for individual names.

The Brief: Are clients more demanding in the digital, iPod, iTunes era?

Pirate: The ‘commodification’ of music, in general, has put enormous pressure on music writers and producers in the commercial world. 

Grayson Matthews: Agreed. As the internet has created infinite access to music, virtually for free, or at least that’s how it’s perceived, you sometimes get the sense that even when someone hears something they like they still ask to hear more as it feels like the world of music is endless and can provide endless options. While the amount of music seems endless, quality is few and far between especially when you consider that something has to fit a project like a glove.

Pirate Music: The expectation is that the pieces of music will sound as good as those collections of songs on a client’s iPod that they listen to on their way to work – I can’t count the number of times the brief includes the saying “it should sound like it came off a record.” (but it’s not unrealistic because people are doing it.)

Doane LeBlanc: At the same time, it’s also cheaper to license indie tracks because there’s so much available. You can see an indie musician giving away their original work for exposure. Artists can win if it’s a successful ad. That Chevy Cruise commercial with that cool track by Janelle Monae. She probably got paid, but not merely as much as she got exposure and fame. Feist is another great example. 

Pirate: I think the biggest change that has altered the landscape of Canadian music, both for commercials and otherwise, is the decline of the traditional model for the ways in which artists and bands generate income. As a result, artists/bands have had to reconsider the ways in which they are prepared to make money. That has led to a much greater willingness amongst artists/bands to license their music for commercials. (Unlike in years past, many artists/bands would now jump at the chance to license a piece of their music for a commercial, both for the license fee and for the exposure.) 

The Brief: So who came first Feist or the Apple?

Pirate: …the way I see it, Feist came first, followed by Apple licensing one of her hits, which set a huge precedent, and then some unknown band wrote a :30 piece that sounds as cool as Feist, got licensed by Joe Fresh and suddenly became wildly popular overnight.

The Brief: Are there new sexy digital tools for creating music today? Like 3D or 4D music?

Grayson Matthews: Computers just keep getting better at doing more which has heavily increased a producer’s arsenal but still the best sounds and track we ever do always come from going back to the traditional way of playing and recoding instruments and collaborating as artists. Creating a real experience in the playing and producing as opposed to crafting on a computer.

Doane LeBlanc: The digital age changed everything in audio production but the basic tools have plateaued. There are newer versions of everything released everyday but newer is not always better. Quality audio production is being done using classic recording techniques and the powerful editing and processing available in the DAW domain.

Pirate: The use of autotune as a musical instrument came and went pretty quickly. I’ve heard Melodyne can do some pretty amazing stuff to alter and correct single notes in a wall of stereo sound, though I don’t use it. But I also think a return to old school vintage gear, textures and production techniques to be back in a big way with the writers I know and work with.

The Brief: One-offs. Do they put a lot of extra burden on the music?

Doane LeBlanc:
There seems to be more one-offs in Toronto. Don’t have to stay with the same music… and repetition carries a brand forward… but… kids are buying singles. Not albums. With kid culture you need to change it up. Also, people everywhere expect results quickly. It’s the nature of the beast. They abandon a good idea too soon to marinate. 

Pirate: When Juno came out, every other music brief was for a quirky folk song with off beat lyrics, like that strangely infectious Moldy Peaches song. Then that got old and briefs turned to Vampire Weekend or more recently, Florence and the Machine. I definitely think commercial music is heavily influenced by the trends and fads in popular music and what’s cool and hip at any given time. But perhaps that’s for good reason, since fresh sounds and new exciting music has a powerful influence on catching people’s attention and making them feel a certain way. Right now, the “indie” sound is very popular, but I view the very definition of that term as a continually moving target, with the coming and passing of fads and trends.

The Brief: How has scoring for the web effected you? 

Pirate: At first, we all expected the web to drastically change what we do, even at the risk of making us sound people obsolete. What we’e discovering now is that online-based projects have a lot of the same requirements as traditional TV. And in truth, a lot of “online videos” currently being produced are really just extended TV commercials or mini films, with full blown music tracks, voiceover, and sound design. 

Doane LeBlanc: In some cases advertisers launch spots for web only. These usually run longer than 30 or 60 sec and can allow time and space for more creative music and SFX. Web content can be a very different and creative beast.

The Brief: Speaking of SFX, how has sound design evolved?

Grayson Matthews: The marriage of sound design and music is very popular and catching my ear these days. When it’s done well you can’t tell what is music and what is a sound effect. They work in harmony to create a very visceral experience that can be very cinematic. We worked on the latest Canadian Sapporo campaign that we are very proud of and we think we’ve done just that in this case. The new civilization Adidas ads using the new Justice single is another shining example.

Tattoo: The Toronto ad community seems to lean towards a minimalist approach to sound design. We’re a bit unique because we continue to hear spots out of the US and Europe that treat sound design much like a feature film. Very creative and sophisticated approaches.

Pirate: I’ve noticed the transition of the medium to HD and the implications that has on sound design and levels in mixing overall. HD brings sound to life in such a big, more impactful way that, when we have to do a fold down mix from HD to SD, it’s a bit of a tug of war. The depth and clarity of great sound design can be lost in an SD fold down mix and, vice versa, a sound effect that sits comfortably in the mix in SD, can sometimes be too bombastic and explosive in an HD context – you’re forced to find a middle ground somewhere, a compromise. The better alternative, though often cost prohibitive, is to do separate SD and HD mixes. I have yet to see a client take that route though.

The Brief: Has the post-recession played havoc with budgets. (I hear the quartet groan in F-flat.)

Pirate: Yes. We’ve seen a fairly major contraction in the industry as a whole, and I think the recession played a pretty major role in that. Unfortunately, reduced budgets have set a precedent for what producers think the audio on any given job should cost, and it’s presented major challenges for us, the suppliers, to deliver the quality we strive to achieve, all the while working within our client’s budget. 

Also, the online world of advertising is a very new platform, and it will be very interesting to see how that story plays out, as the advertising revenue streams catch up with the technology and the ability to deliver high resolution content, with minimal lag time. To me, online commercials most often require the same amount of work as television commercials, and I believe they offer the same, if not more powerful potential to reach the consumer. However, the stigma that still lingers in the world of producing online commercials is that there isn’t the same opportunity for advertising revenue. I think we’ll see a great deal of change and innovation in this arena in the years to come.

The Brief: With all the above, is this a creative time in your discipline?

Pirate: Terry O’Reilly once told me that the periods of the greatest innovation tend to coincide with economic hardship. People are forced to work harder, think outside of the box, and come up with new ways to cut through the white noise. As we emerge from the recession, looking back over the past couple of years, I feel like there have been some very novel, artistic and creative projects. But even more so, there have been some really creative ways people have learned to do great work within the confinements of a really tight budget.

In closing, The Brief discovered that it’s difficult for music production houses to close. As it is in every discipline in advertising. And that success, as always, is fueled by those wonderful relationships built on trust. 

The Brief would like to thank the generous artists and experts who work tirelessly to make you stop, look and listen. Check out the websites below to find a selection of superb solutions for your clients’ business needs. 

Here’s an example of a great indie song. “Out with the old” Artist: Casa Di Mondo bought by Telus.

Sources of inspiration

Creighton Doane and Daniel LeBlanc, www.doaneleblanc.com

Brendan Quinn, www.piratetoronto.com

Steve Convery, www.ta2music.com

Dave Sorbara, www.graysonmatthews.com

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Music Production – you deserve a break today.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Music anchors private moments in our life. Like a photograph but with keener focus. Who can forget the perfect coupling of Gershwin and Gene Hackman for Continental Airlines? Or, more recently Feist for Apple? Or, back again, McDonald’s brilliantly insightful “You Deserve a Break Today.”

Advertisers try their best to find just the right music to invoke your life into their brand and vice verse. It’s a request for enchantment. For intuition. And we’ll find out why it’s difficult for a client to make up their mind and more. 

For answers to this, The Brief turned to a quartet of commercial music pros. Brendan Quinn, composer/director at Pirate Toronto; Creighton Doane and Danny LeBlanc, owners, composers, directors, musicians at Doane LeBlanc; Steve Convery, audio producer/director at Tattoo Sound + Music; and Dave Sorbara, owner, composer, music director at Grayson Matthews. 

For clarity’s sake, The Brief substituted production companies for individual names.

The Brief: Are clients more demanding in the digital, iPod, iTunes era?

Pirate: The ‘commodification’ of music, in general, has put enormous pressure on music writers and producers in the commercial world. 

Grayson Matthews: Agreed. As the internet has created infinite access to music, virtually for free, or at least that’s how it’s perceived, you sometimes get the sense that even when someone hears something they like they still ask to hear more as it feels like the world of music is endless and can provide endless options. While the amount of music seems endless, quality is few and far between especially when you consider that something has to fit a project like a glove.

Pirate Music: The expectation is that the pieces of music will sound as good as those collections of songs on a client’s iPod that they listen to on their way to work – I can’t count the number of times the brief includes the saying “it should sound like it came off a record.” (but it’s not unrealistic because people are doing it.)

Doane LeBlanc: At the same time, it’s also cheaper to license indie tracks because there’s so much available. You can see an indie musician giving away their original work for exposure. Artists can win if it’s a successful ad. That Chevy Cruise commercial with that cool track by Janelle Monae. She probably got paid, but not merely as much as she got exposure and fame. Feist is another great example. 

Pirate: I think the biggest change that has altered the landscape of Canadian music, both for commercials and otherwise, is the decline of the traditional model for the ways in which artists and bands generate income. As a result, artists/bands have had to reconsider the ways in which they are prepared to make money. That has led to a much greater willingness amongst artists/bands to license their music for commercials. (Unlike in years past, many artists/bands would now jump at the chance to license a piece of their music for a commercial, both for the license fee and for the exposure.) 

The Brief: So who came first Feist or the Apple?

Pirate: …the way I see it, Feist came first, followed by Apple licensing one of her hits, which set a huge precedent, and then some unknown band wrote a :30 piece that sounds as cool as Feist, got licensed by Joe Fresh and suddenly became wildly popular overnight.

The Brief: Are there new sexy digital tools for creating music today? Like 3D or 4D music?

Grayson Matthews: Computers just keep getting better at doing more which has heavily increased a producer’s arsenal but still the best sounds and track we ever do always come from going back to the traditional way of playing and recoding instruments and collaborating as artists. Creating a real experience in the playing and producing as opposed to crafting on a computer.

Doane LeBlanc: The digital age changed everything in audio production but the basic tools have plateaued. There are newer versions of everything released everyday but newer is not always better. Quality audio production is being done using classic recording techniques and the powerful editing and processing available in the DAW domain.

Pirate: The use of autotune as a musical instrument came and went pretty quickly. I’ve heard Melodyne can do some pretty amazing stuff to alter and correct single notes in a wall of stereo sound, though I don’t use it. But I also think a return to old school vintage gear, textures and production techniques to be back in a big way with the writers I know and work with.

The Brief: One-offs. Do they put a lot of extra burden on the music?

Doane LeBlanc:
There seems to be more one-offs in Toronto. Don’t have to stay with the same music… and repetition carries a brand forward… but… kids are buying singles. Not albums. With kid culture you need to change it up. Also, people everywhere expect results quickly. It’s the nature of the beast. They abandon a good idea too soon to marinate. 

Pirate: When Juno came out, every other music brief was for a quirky folk song with off beat lyrics, like that strangely infectious Moldy Peaches song. Then that got old and briefs turned to Vampire Weekend or more recently, Florence and the Machine. I definitely think commercial music is heavily influenced by the trends and fads in popular music and what’s cool and hip at any given time. But perhaps that’s for good reason, since fresh sounds and new exciting music has a powerful influence on catching people’s attention and making them feel a certain way. Right now, the “indie” sound is very popular, but I view the very definition of that term as a continually moving target, with the coming and passing of fads and trends.

The Brief: How has scoring for the web effected you? 

Pirate: At first, we all expected the web to drastically change what we do, even at the risk of making us sound people obsolete. What we’e discovering now is that online-based projects have a lot of the same requirements as traditional TV. And in truth, a lot of “online videos” currently being produced are really just extended TV commercials or mini films, with full blown music tracks, voiceover, and sound design. 

Doane LeBlanc: In some cases advertisers launch spots for web only. These usually run longer than 30 or 60 sec and can allow time and space for more creative music and SFX. Web content can be a very different and creative beast.

The Brief: Speaking of SFX, how has sound design evolved?

Grayson Matthews: The marriage of sound design and music is very popular and catching my ear these days. When it’s done well you can’t tell what is music and what is a sound effect. They work in harmony to create a very visceral experience that can be very cinematic. We worked on the latest Canadian Sapporo campaign that we are very proud of and we think we’ve done just that in this case. The new civilization Adidas ads using the new Justice single is another shining example.

Tattoo: The Toronto ad community seems to lean towards a minimalist approach to sound design. We’re a bit unique because we continue to hear spots out of the US and Europe that treat sound design much like a feature film. Very creative and sophisticated approaches.

Pirate: I’ve noticed the transition of the medium to HD and the implications that has on sound design and levels in mixing overall. HD brings sound to life in such a big, more impactful way that, when we have to do a fold down mix from HD to SD, it’s a bit of a tug of war. The depth and clarity of great sound design can be lost in an SD fold down mix and, vice versa, a sound effect that sits comfortably in the mix in SD, can sometimes be too bombastic and explosive in an HD context – you’re forced to find a middle ground somewhere, a compromise. The better alternative, though often cost prohibitive, is to do separate SD and HD mixes. I have yet to see a client take that route though.

The Brief: Has the post-recession played havoc with budgets. (I hear the quartet groan in F-flat.)

Pirate: Yes. We’ve seen a fairly major contraction in the industry as a whole, and I think the recession played a pretty major role in that. Unfortunately, reduced budgets have set a precedent for what producers think the audio on any given job should cost, and it’s presented major challenges for us, the suppliers, to deliver the quality we strive to achieve, all the while working within our client’s budget. 

Also, the online world of advertising is a very new platform, and it will be very interesting to see how that story plays out, as the advertising revenue streams catch up with the technology and the ability to deliver high resolution content, with minimal lag time. To me, online commercials most often require the same amount of work as television commercials, and I believe they offer the same, if not more powerful potential to reach the consumer. However, the stigma that still lingers in the world of producing online commercials is that there isn’t the same opportunity for advertising revenue. I think we’ll see a great deal of change and innovation in this arena in the years to come.

The Brief: With all the above, is this a creative time in your discipline?

Pirate: Terry O’Reilly once told me that the periods of the greatest innovation tend to coincide with economic hardship. People are forced to work harder, think outside of the box, and come up with new ways to cut through the white noise. As we emerge from the recession, looking back over the past couple of years, I feel like there have been some very novel, artistic and creative projects. But even more so, there have been some really creative ways people have learned to do great work within the confinements of a really tight budget.

In closing, The Brief discovered that it’s difficult for music production houses to close. As it is in every discipline in advertising. And that success, as always, is fueled by those wonderful relationships built on trust. 

The Brief would like to thank the generous artists and experts who work tirelessly to make you stop, look and listen. Check out the websites below to find a selection of superb solutions for your clients’ business needs. 

Here’s an example of a great indie song. “Out with the old” Artist: Casa Di Mondo bought by Telus.

Sources of inspiration

Creighton Doane and Daniel LeBlanc, www.doaneleblanc.com

Brendan Quinn, www.piratetoronto.com

Steve Convery, www.ta2music.com

Dave Sorbara, www.graysonmatthews.com

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Music Production – you deserve a break today.

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

Music anchors private moments in our life. Like a photograph but with keener focus. Who can forget the perfect coupling of Gershwin and Gene Hackman for Continental Airlines? Or, more recently Feist for Apple? Or, back again, McDonald’s brilliantly insightful “You Deserve a Break Today.”

Advertisers try their best to find just the right music to invoke your life into their brand and vice verse. It’s a request for enchantment. For intuition. And we’ll find out why it’s difficult for a client to make up their mind and more. 

For answers to this, The Brief turned to a quartet of commercial music pros. Brendan Quinn, composer/director at Pirate Toronto; Creighton Doane and Danny LeBlanc, owners, composers, directors, musicians at Doane LeBlanc; Steve Convery, audio producer/director at Tattoo Sound + Music; and Dave Sorbara, owner, composer, music director at Grayson Matthews. 

For clarity’s sake, The Brief substituted production companies for individual names.

The Brief: Are clients more demanding in the digital, iPod, iTunes era?

Pirate: The ‘commodification’ of music, in general, has put enormous pressure on music writers and producers in the commercial world. 

Grayson Matthews: Agreed. As the internet has created infinite access to music, virtually for free, or at least that’s how it’s perceived, you sometimes get the sense that even when someone hears something they like they still ask to hear more as it feels like the world of music is endless and can provide endless options. While the amount of music seems endless, quality is few and far between especially when you consider that something has to fit a project like a glove.

Pirate Music: The expectation is that the pieces of music will sound as good as those collections of songs on a client’s iPod that they listen to on their way to work – I can’t count the number of times the brief includes the saying “it should sound like it came off a record.” (but it’s not unrealistic because people are doing it.)

Doane LeBlanc: At the same time, it’s also cheaper to license indie tracks because there’s so much available. You can see an indie musician giving away their original work for exposure. Artists can win if it’s a successful ad. That Chevy Cruise commercial with that cool track by Janelle Monae. She probably got paid, but not merely as much as she got exposure and fame. Feist is another great example. 

Pirate: I think the biggest change that has altered the landscape of Canadian music, both for commercials and otherwise, is the decline of the traditional model for the ways in which artists and bands generate income. As a result, artists/bands have had to reconsider the ways in which they are prepared to make money. That has led to a much greater willingness amongst artists/bands to license their music for commercials. (Unlike in years past, many artists/bands would now jump at the chance to license a piece of their music for a commercial, both for the license fee and for the exposure.) 

The Brief: So who came first Feist or the Apple?

Pirate: …the way I see it, Feist came first, followed by Apple licensing one of her hits, which set a huge precedent, and then some unknown band wrote a :30 piece that sounds as cool as Feist, got licensed by Joe Fresh and suddenly became wildly popular overnight.

The Brief: Are there new sexy digital tools for creating music today? Like 3D or 4D music?

Grayson Matthews: Computers just keep getting better at doing more which has heavily increased a producer’s arsenal but still the best sounds and track we ever do always come from going back to the traditional way of playing and recoding instruments and collaborating as artists. Creating a real experience in the playing and producing as opposed to crafting on a computer.

Doane LeBlanc: The digital age changed everything in audio production but the basic tools have plateaued. There are newer versions of everything released everyday but newer is not always better. Quality audio production is being done using classic recording techniques and the powerful editing and processing available in the DAW domain.

Pirate: The use of autotune as a musical instrument came and went pretty quickly. I’ve heard Melodyne can do some pretty amazing stuff to alter and correct single notes in a wall of stereo sound, though I don’t use it. But I also think a return to old school vintage gear, textures and production techniques to be back in a big way with the writers I know and work with.

The Brief: One-offs. Do they put a lot of extra burden on the music?

Doane LeBlanc:
There seems to be more one-offs in Toronto. Don’t have to stay with the same music… and repetition carries a brand forward… but… kids are buying singles. Not albums. With kid culture you need to change it up. Also, people everywhere expect results quickly. It’s the nature of the beast. They abandon a good idea too soon to marinate. 

Pirate: When Juno came out, every other music brief was for a quirky folk song with off beat lyrics, like that strangely infectious Moldy Peaches song. Then that got old and briefs turned to Vampire Weekend or more recently, Florence and the Machine. I definitely think commercial music is heavily influenced by the trends and fads in popular music and what’s cool and hip at any given time. But perhaps that’s for good reason, since fresh sounds and new exciting music has a powerful influence on catching people’s attention and making them feel a certain way. Right now, the “indie” sound is very popular, but I view the very definition of that term as a continually moving target, with the coming and passing of fads and trends.

The Brief: How has scoring for the web effected you? 

Pirate: At first, we all expected the web to drastically change what we do, even at the risk of making us sound people obsolete. What we’e discovering now is that online-based projects have a lot of the same requirements as traditional TV. And in truth, a lot of “online videos” currently being produced are really just extended TV commercials or mini films, with full blown music tracks, voiceover, and sound design. 

Doane LeBlanc: In some cases advertisers launch spots for web only. These usually run longer than 30 or 60 sec and can allow time and space for more creative music and SFX. Web content can be a very different and creative beast.

The Brief: Speaking of SFX, how has sound design evolved?

Grayson Matthews: The marriage of sound design and music is very popular and catching my ear these days. When it’s done well you can’t tell what is music and what is a sound effect. They work in harmony to create a very visceral experience that can be very cinematic. We worked on the latest Canadian Sapporo campaign that we are very proud of and we think we’ve done just that in this case. The new civilization Adidas ads using the new Justice single is another shining example.

Tattoo: The Toronto ad community seems to lean towards a minimalist approach to sound design. We’re a bit unique because we continue to hear spots out of the US and Europe that treat sound design much like a feature film. Very creative and sophisticated approaches.

Pirate: I’ve noticed the transition of the medium to HD and the implications that has on sound design and levels in mixing overall. HD brings sound to life in such a big, more impactful way that, when we have to do a fold down mix from HD to SD, it’s a bit of a tug of war. The depth and clarity of great sound design can be lost in an SD fold down mix and, vice versa, a sound effect that sits comfortably in the mix in SD, can sometimes be too bombastic and explosive in an HD context – you’re forced to find a middle ground somewhere, a compromise. The better alternative, though often cost prohibitive, is to do separate SD and HD mixes. I have yet to see a client take that route though.

The Brief: Has the post-recession played havoc with budgets. (I hear the quartet groan in F-flat.)

Pirate: Yes. We’ve seen a fairly major contraction in the industry as a whole, and I think the recession played a pretty major role in that. Unfortunately, reduced budgets have set a precedent for what producers think the audio on any given job should cost, and it’s presented major challenges for us, the suppliers, to deliver the quality we strive to achieve, all the while working within our client’s budget. 

Also, the online world of advertising is a very new platform, and it will be very interesting to see how that story plays out, as the advertising revenue streams catch up with the technology and the ability to deliver high resolution content, with minimal lag time. To me, online commercials most often require the same amount of work as television commercials, and I believe they offer the same, if not more powerful potential to reach the consumer. However, the stigma that still lingers in the world of producing online commercials is that there isn’t the same opportunity for advertising revenue. I think we’ll see a great deal of change and innovation in this arena in the years to come.

The Brief: With all the above, is this a creative time in your discipline?

Pirate: Terry O’Reilly once told me that the periods of the greatest innovation tend to coincide with economic hardship. People are forced to work harder, think outside of the box, and come up with new ways to cut through the white noise. As we emerge from the recession, looking back over the past couple of years, I feel like there have been some very novel, artistic and creative projects. But even more so, there have been some really creative ways people have learned to do great work within the confinements of a really tight budget.

In closing, The Brief discovered that it’s difficult for music production houses to close. As it is in every discipline in advertising. And that success, as always, is fueled by those wonderful relationships built on trust. 

The Brief would like to thank the generous artists and experts who work tirelessly to make you stop, look and listen. Check out the websites below to find a selection of superb solutions for your clients’ business needs. 

Here’s an example of a great indie song. “Out with the old” Artist: Casa Di Mondo bought by Telus.

Sources of inspiration

Creighton Doane and Daniel LeBlanc, www.doaneleblanc.com

Brendan Quinn, www.piratetoronto.com

Steve Convery, www.ta2music.com

Dave Sorbara, www.graysonmatthews.com

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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