Oct 22, 2019
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Winnipeg filmmaker’s Keyhole named best Canadian feature

Keyhole, the latest feature film from Winnipeg auteur Guy Maddin, is the winner of the coveted Borsos Competition for best Canadian feature film at the 2011 Whistler Film Festival.

Shot in Maddin’s typical surrealist style, the film stars Isabella Rossellini, Jason Patric and Udo Kier in a tale of gangsters and ghosts, based loosely on Homer’s The Odyssey and James Joyce’s Ulysses.

The film was chosen from six in competition by a three-member panel of judges: actor and filmmaker Jacob Tierney (Good Neighbours, The Trotsky), producer Shirley Vercruysse (Radiant City, Waydowntown), and actress Sarah Gadon (A Dangerous Method), who praised Maddin’s film for its “inventiveness, audacity and humour.”

The award, named for late Canadian filmmaker Phillip Borsos, carries with it a $15,000 cash prize.

Maddin, who was not present to accept the award at the Whistler Conference Centre Sunday morning, sent a written statement that had those assembled laughing in their seats. “This has been my first virtual festival, I wish it didn’t have to be this way. Oh, how many times I’ve cracked my head on my monitor screen trying to dive into your company.

“Next year I shall come, at first to lurk beneath snowy boughs just outside fest headquarters, then maybe I’ll be drawn out to socialize. If so, watch out. I can be a bit sasquatch-y, and this award, great as it is, ain’t going to change me that much!”

The New Voices International Feature Competition was launched in 2010 to honour rising directors who are bringing their first or second feature to the screen this year, and carries a cash prize of $10,000. This year the honour went to Mexico’s Kyzza Terrazas for Machete Language, which tells the story of two angry and disillusioned youths whose push for social justice leads them into a dangerous downward spiral.

Actor Andrés Almeida accepted the award on Terrazas’ behalf. Almeida thanked the audience and hoisted the statuette, saying, “I think [Terrazas is] going to be super excited when I tell him [the film won]. He’s going to be crapping his pants because he’s got $10,000 in his bank account now.”

The MPPIA Short Film Award went to Mark Ratzlaff for his short film pitch project Beauty Mark. Ratzlaff will receive a total of $15,000 from award co-sponsors MPPIA and British Columbia Film + Media. He will also receive up to $100,000 of in-kind contributions of production services to develop and produce his short film.

Other awards included the Mountain Culture Award, which went to Richard Boyce for Rainforest: The Limit of Splendour; Best Student Shortwork to Ryan Flowers and Lisa Pham for No Words Came Down; and Best Shortwork, to director Benny Schuetze for The Paris Quintet in Practice Makes Perfect. Director Ben Addelman took the Best Documentary Award for his film Kivalina v. Exxon.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Front Page, Industry News

Winnipeg filmmaker’s Keyhole named best Canadian feature

Keyhole, the latest feature film from Winnipeg auteur Guy Maddin, is the winner of the coveted Borsos Competition for best Canadian feature film at the 2011 Whistler Film Festival.

Shot in Maddin’s typical surrealist style, the film stars Isabella Rossellini, Jason Patric and Udo Kier in a tale of gangsters and ghosts, based loosely on Homer’s The Odyssey and James Joyce’s Ulysses.

The film was chosen from six in competition by a three-member panel of judges: actor and filmmaker Jacob Tierney (Good Neighbours, The Trotsky), producer Shirley Vercruysse (Radiant City, Waydowntown), and actress Sarah Gadon (A Dangerous Method), who praised Maddin’s film for its “inventiveness, audacity and humour.”

The award, named for late Canadian filmmaker Phillip Borsos, carries with it a $15,000 cash prize.

Maddin, who was not present to accept the award at the Whistler Conference Centre Sunday morning, sent a written statement that had those assembled laughing in their seats. “This has been my first virtual festival, I wish it didn’t have to be this way. Oh, how many times I’ve cracked my head on my monitor screen trying to dive into your company.

“Next year I shall come, at first to lurk beneath snowy boughs just outside fest headquarters, then maybe I’ll be drawn out to socialize. If so, watch out. I can be a bit sasquatch-y, and this award, great as it is, ain’t going to change me that much!”

The New Voices International Feature Competition was launched in 2010 to honour rising directors who are bringing their first or second feature to the screen this year, and carries a cash prize of $10,000. This year the honour went to Mexico’s Kyzza Terrazas for Machete Language, which tells the story of two angry and disillusioned youths whose push for social justice leads them into a dangerous downward spiral.

Actor Andrés Almeida accepted the award on Terrazas’ behalf. Almeida thanked the audience and hoisted the statuette, saying, “I think [Terrazas is] going to be super excited when I tell him [the film won]. He’s going to be crapping his pants because he’s got $10,000 in his bank account now.”

The MPPIA Short Film Award went to Mark Ratzlaff for his short film pitch project Beauty Mark. Ratzlaff will receive a total of $15,000 from award co-sponsors MPPIA and British Columbia Film + Media. He will also receive up to $100,000 of in-kind contributions of production services to develop and produce his short film.

Other awards included the Mountain Culture Award, which went to Richard Boyce for Rainforest: The Limit of Splendour; Best Student Shortwork to Ryan Flowers and Lisa Pham for No Words Came Down; and Best Shortwork, to director Benny Schuetze for The Paris Quintet in Practice Makes Perfect. Director Ben Addelman took the Best Documentary Award for his film Kivalina v. Exxon.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Winnipeg filmmaker’s Keyhole named best Canadian feature

Keyhole, the latest feature film from Winnipeg auteur Guy Maddin, is the winner of the coveted Borsos Competition for best Canadian feature film at the 2011 Whistler Film Festival.

Shot in Maddin’s typical surrealist style, the film stars Isabella Rossellini, Jason Patric and Udo Kier in a tale of gangsters and ghosts, based loosely on Homer’s The Odyssey and James Joyce’s Ulysses.

The film was chosen from six in competition by a three-member panel of judges: actor and filmmaker Jacob Tierney (Good Neighbours, The Trotsky), producer Shirley Vercruysse (Radiant City, Waydowntown), and actress Sarah Gadon (A Dangerous Method), who praised Maddin’s film for its “inventiveness, audacity and humour.”

The award, named for late Canadian filmmaker Phillip Borsos, carries with it a $15,000 cash prize.

Maddin, who was not present to accept the award at the Whistler Conference Centre Sunday morning, sent a written statement that had those assembled laughing in their seats. “This has been my first virtual festival, I wish it didn’t have to be this way. Oh, how many times I’ve cracked my head on my monitor screen trying to dive into your company.

“Next year I shall come, at first to lurk beneath snowy boughs just outside fest headquarters, then maybe I’ll be drawn out to socialize. If so, watch out. I can be a bit sasquatch-y, and this award, great as it is, ain’t going to change me that much!”

The New Voices International Feature Competition was launched in 2010 to honour rising directors who are bringing their first or second feature to the screen this year, and carries a cash prize of $10,000. This year the honour went to Mexico’s Kyzza Terrazas for Machete Language, which tells the story of two angry and disillusioned youths whose push for social justice leads them into a dangerous downward spiral.

Actor Andrés Almeida accepted the award on Terrazas’ behalf. Almeida thanked the audience and hoisted the statuette, saying, “I think [Terrazas is] going to be super excited when I tell him [the film won]. He’s going to be crapping his pants because he’s got $10,000 in his bank account now.”

The MPPIA Short Film Award went to Mark Ratzlaff for his short film pitch project Beauty Mark. Ratzlaff will receive a total of $15,000 from award co-sponsors MPPIA and British Columbia Film + Media. He will also receive up to $100,000 of in-kind contributions of production services to develop and produce his short film.

Other awards included the Mountain Culture Award, which went to Richard Boyce for Rainforest: The Limit of Splendour; Best Student Shortwork to Ryan Flowers and Lisa Pham for No Words Came Down; and Best Shortwork, to director Benny Schuetze for The Paris Quintet in Practice Makes Perfect. Director Ben Addelman took the Best Documentary Award for his film Kivalina v. Exxon.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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