Oct 16, 2021
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Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Taking on a packaged good, a communications company, and a financial institution

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

1. When life throws you lemons, make Florida Orange Juice.
Florida Orange Juice fortifies you with more than Vitamin C, it gets you through the day, no matter what your day may bring. At least that’s what the Florida Orange Juice campaign would have you entertain. One glass in the morning will brace you from the evils of teenagers, unforeseen chaos at work, and dating wackos. The net/net of the campaign is that drinking a glass of Florida Orange Juice in the morning will support you with the equanimity suggestive of weed, coupled with the physical stamina of speed.

Like snake oil, a gulp in the morning will give you everything you need to take on all the pulp life has to offer. Isn’t that wonderful?

Challenges such as turning on your TV and being subjected to the new Rogers’ campaign.

2. Like it or not, Rogers is your partner in life. With a new and ubiquitous campaign that uses slice of life commercials that also break the fourth wall, the communications company attempts to show how interwoven their products and services are with every facet of our life. A curious conceit was the casting of the same boorish red-haired* actor throughout each spot for continuity. Very risky business if you don’t cast properly. Perhaps you saw him in Rogers’ Christmas commercial every 15 minutes like I did? If not, I paraphrase the spot below:

A 30-something red-haired husband and his wife are sitting at their dining room table. He is playing orgasmically with a new tablet (which comes free with two new mobile phones from Rogers). The wife is idly fiddling around with a ribbon on a gift she just wrapped. 

HUSBAND

(playing with a free tablet)

Thanks to the kids getting two Rogers’ mobile phones that THEY always wanted, Dad gets the free tablet he always wanted.

MOM

(defensively)

Or, Mom.

HUSBAND

(laying it on thick)

Of course! Absolutely! You can have it.

The husband turns to the camera, breaks the fourth wall and smirks an ‘as if’ to us.

I’m thinking about how to find Mom a good divorce attorney when I remember it’s only a Rogers commercial. Then I wonder why on earth a slice-of-life commercial breaks the fourth wall? It’s a poor technique that makes one feel like the husband is omnipotent. (Keep that notion in mind.)

One more from Rogers. Again, I paraphrase.

In a generic office, an officious boss (the same red- haired blowhard) walks past the work cubicles and stops for a split moment to leer at an underling who is watching a hockey game on his computer. The employee is noticeably shaken.

RED-HAIRED BOSS

(sternly)

[Name] get in my office. 

RED HAIRED BOSS

And bring your computer.

Breaking the fourth wall, the boss smirks straight to camera.

The Brief hates this campaign and there are so many more spots in this series to disparage. But to Rogers’ credit, The Brief believes this campaign is nothing if not honest. 

The protagonist is an omnipotent bully. Just like Rogers. 

Herein lies the perfect example of a brand being too true to its essence.

3. Scotiabank says I’m richer than I think. I’m so happy? This great expectations campaign has been running throughout this not-so-great depression and has the gall to insist: “You’re richer than you think.”

Even while they nickel and dime you with hidden fees, Scotiabank personifies itself as the bank that finds you hidden cash. Please.

On Scotiabank’s homepage is the visual of an autumn leaf. (At my age I take that to be a metaphor.) The headline reads – Richness is: All around you. Look under the bed and come back. 

Not surprisingly, the copy squirms like an eel, like a Wall Street con, out of the premise. 

You have to read the copy. 

“You define richness. Not us, that’s for sure. We do know that everyone’s definition of richness is different and it’s rarely about money. Let’s talk about what richness means to you, starting with your next five years.” 

“Rarely about money”! ARE THEY INSANE? 

We all know what our idea of “richer” means in the context of banking. But, Scotiabank isn’t discussing how to get richer, or even rich; they’ve slyly replaced the idea of “rich”, which we understand as the accumulation of wealth, with the nature of “richness.”

A Deepak Chopra kind of richness. Good luck buying a house with that. 

Thank God I started my day with Florida Orange Juice.

Sources:

  • Rogers Communications has continued to cast red-haired actors in their new campaigns. Your guess is as good as mine. Write in.

Please send me feedback about what you feel about the climate of creativity and strategy. Always eager to hear from you.

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Taking on a packaged good, a communications company, and a financial institution

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

1. When life throws you lemons, make Florida Orange Juice.
Florida Orange Juice fortifies you with more than Vitamin C, it gets you through the day, no matter what your day may bring. At least that’s what the Florida Orange Juice campaign would have you entertain. One glass in the morning will brace you from the evils of teenagers, unforeseen chaos at work, and dating wackos. The net/net of the campaign is that drinking a glass of Florida Orange Juice in the morning will support you with the equanimity suggestive of weed, coupled with the physical stamina of speed.

Like snake oil, a gulp in the morning will give you everything you need to take on all the pulp life has to offer. Isn’t that wonderful?

Challenges such as turning on your TV and being subjected to the new Rogers’ campaign.

2. Like it or not, Rogers is your partner in life. With a new and ubiquitous campaign that uses slice of life commercials that also break the fourth wall, the communications company attempts to show how interwoven their products and services are with every facet of our life. A curious conceit was the casting of the same boorish red-haired* actor throughout each spot for continuity. Very risky business if you don’t cast properly. Perhaps you saw him in Rogers’ Christmas commercial every 15 minutes like I did? If not, I paraphrase the spot below:

A 30-something red-haired husband and his wife are sitting at their dining room table. He is playing orgasmically with a new tablet (which comes free with two new mobile phones from Rogers). The wife is idly fiddling around with a ribbon on a gift she just wrapped. 

HUSBAND

(playing with a free tablet)

Thanks to the kids getting two Rogers’ mobile phones that THEY always wanted, Dad gets the free tablet he always wanted.

MOM

(defensively)

Or, Mom.

HUSBAND

(laying it on thick)

Of course! Absolutely! You can have it.

The husband turns to the camera, breaks the fourth wall and smirks an ‘as if’ to us.

I’m thinking about how to find Mom a good divorce attorney when I remember it’s only a Rogers commercial. Then I wonder why on earth a slice-of-life commercial breaks the fourth wall? It’s a poor technique that makes one feel like the husband is omnipotent. (Keep that notion in mind.)

One more from Rogers. Again, I paraphrase.

In a generic office, an officious boss (the same red- haired blowhard) walks past the work cubicles and stops for a split moment to leer at an underling who is watching a hockey game on his computer. The employee is noticeably shaken.

RED-HAIRED BOSS

(sternly)

[Name] get in my office. 

RED HAIRED BOSS

And bring your computer.

Breaking the fourth wall, the boss smirks straight to camera.

The Brief hates this campaign and there are so many more spots in this series to disparage. But to Rogers’ credit, The Brief believes this campaign is nothing if not honest. 

The protagonist is an omnipotent bully. Just like Rogers. 

Herein lies the perfect example of a brand being too true to its essence.

3. Scotiabank says I’m richer than I think. I’m so happy? This great expectations campaign has been running throughout this not-so-great depression and has the gall to insist: “You’re richer than you think.”

Even while they nickel and dime you with hidden fees, Scotiabank personifies itself as the bank that finds you hidden cash. Please.

On Scotiabank’s homepage is the visual of an autumn leaf. (At my age I take that to be a metaphor.) The headline reads – Richness is: All around you. Look under the bed and come back. 

Not surprisingly, the copy squirms like an eel, like a Wall Street con, out of the premise. 

You have to read the copy. 

“You define richness. Not us, that’s for sure. We do know that everyone’s definition of richness is different and it’s rarely about money. Let’s talk about what richness means to you, starting with your next five years.” 

“Rarely about money”! ARE THEY INSANE? 

We all know what our idea of “richer” means in the context of banking. But, Scotiabank isn’t discussing how to get richer, or even rich; they’ve slyly replaced the idea of “rich”, which we understand as the accumulation of wealth, with the nature of “richness.”

A Deepak Chopra kind of richness. Good luck buying a house with that. 

Thank God I started my day with Florida Orange Juice.

Sources:

  • Rogers Communications has continued to cast red-haired actors in their new campaigns. Your guess is as good as mine. Write in.

Please send me feedback about what you feel about the climate of creativity and strategy. Always eager to hear from you.

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Taking on a packaged good, a communications company, and a financial institution

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

1. When life throws you lemons, make Florida Orange Juice.
Florida Orange Juice fortifies you with more than Vitamin C, it gets you through the day, no matter what your day may bring. At least that’s what the Florida Orange Juice campaign would have you entertain. One glass in the morning will brace you from the evils of teenagers, unforeseen chaos at work, and dating wackos. The net/net of the campaign is that drinking a glass of Florida Orange Juice in the morning will support you with the equanimity suggestive of weed, coupled with the physical stamina of speed.

Like snake oil, a gulp in the morning will give you everything you need to take on all the pulp life has to offer. Isn’t that wonderful?

Challenges such as turning on your TV and being subjected to the new Rogers’ campaign.

2. Like it or not, Rogers is your partner in life. With a new and ubiquitous campaign that uses slice of life commercials that also break the fourth wall, the communications company attempts to show how interwoven their products and services are with every facet of our life. A curious conceit was the casting of the same boorish red-haired* actor throughout each spot for continuity. Very risky business if you don’t cast properly. Perhaps you saw him in Rogers’ Christmas commercial every 15 minutes like I did? If not, I paraphrase the spot below:

A 30-something red-haired husband and his wife are sitting at their dining room table. He is playing orgasmically with a new tablet (which comes free with two new mobile phones from Rogers). The wife is idly fiddling around with a ribbon on a gift she just wrapped. 

HUSBAND

(playing with a free tablet)

Thanks to the kids getting two Rogers’ mobile phones that THEY always wanted, Dad gets the free tablet he always wanted.

MOM

(defensively)

Or, Mom.

HUSBAND

(laying it on thick)

Of course! Absolutely! You can have it.

The husband turns to the camera, breaks the fourth wall and smirks an ‘as if’ to us.

I’m thinking about how to find Mom a good divorce attorney when I remember it’s only a Rogers commercial. Then I wonder why on earth a slice-of-life commercial breaks the fourth wall? It’s a poor technique that makes one feel like the husband is omnipotent. (Keep that notion in mind.)

One more from Rogers. Again, I paraphrase.

In a generic office, an officious boss (the same red- haired blowhard) walks past the work cubicles and stops for a split moment to leer at an underling who is watching a hockey game on his computer. The employee is noticeably shaken.

RED-HAIRED BOSS

(sternly)

[Name] get in my office. 

RED HAIRED BOSS

And bring your computer.

Breaking the fourth wall, the boss smirks straight to camera.

The Brief hates this campaign and there are so many more spots in this series to disparage. But to Rogers’ credit, The Brief believes this campaign is nothing if not honest. 

The protagonist is an omnipotent bully. Just like Rogers. 

Herein lies the perfect example of a brand being too true to its essence.

3. Scotiabank says I’m richer than I think. I’m so happy? This great expectations campaign has been running throughout this not-so-great depression and has the gall to insist: “You’re richer than you think.”

Even while they nickel and dime you with hidden fees, Scotiabank personifies itself as the bank that finds you hidden cash. Please.

On Scotiabank’s homepage is the visual of an autumn leaf. (At my age I take that to be a metaphor.) The headline reads – Richness is: All around you. Look under the bed and come back. 

Not surprisingly, the copy squirms like an eel, like a Wall Street con, out of the premise. 

You have to read the copy. 

“You define richness. Not us, that’s for sure. We do know that everyone’s definition of richness is different and it’s rarely about money. Let’s talk about what richness means to you, starting with your next five years.” 

“Rarely about money”! ARE THEY INSANE? 

We all know what our idea of “richer” means in the context of banking. But, Scotiabank isn’t discussing how to get richer, or even rich; they’ve slyly replaced the idea of “rich”, which we understand as the accumulation of wealth, with the nature of “richness.”

A Deepak Chopra kind of richness. Good luck buying a house with that. 

Thank God I started my day with Florida Orange Juice.

Sources:

  • Rogers Communications has continued to cast red-haired actors in their new campaigns. Your guess is as good as mine. Write in.

Please send me feedback about what you feel about the climate of creativity and strategy. Always eager to hear from you.

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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