Jun 17, 2021
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Front Page, Industry News

B.C.’s overall ranking drops despite rise in 2011 film and TV spending

Ontario has overtaken B.C. as a film and television production centre in Canada for the first time in many years despite overall spending on the west coast increasing 16 per cent in 2011 to nearly $1.2 billion.

Community, sport and Cultural Development Minister Ida Chong painted a rosy picture of the industry in a release issued Monday that said production spending last year was up $167 million over 2010.

“B.C. shines as a hub for film and TV production,” said Chong in a statement. “The industry provides good jobs for British Columbians and helps promote B.C.’s unique identity as a great place to live, work and invest.

“We will continue to support the success of film and TV through strategic tax credits, as well as funding for organizations that help filmmakers do business in our province.”

However, B.C.’s overall ranking as a North American production centre dropped from third to fourth place last year, with Ontario beating out B.C. in the rankings for the first time since 1997, except for 2004 when it also beat out B.C.

“It was a decent year for foreign production, but domestic production continues to decrease,” said Peter Leitch, chair of the Motion Picture Production Industry Association of B.C. “And we’re fighting against a more competitive tax credit in Ontario.

“We’re seeing the results of that in 2011 and that’s why we’re No. 4 now instead of No. 3.

Leitch said Ontario’s production spending of $1.265 billion was slightly higher than B.C.’s. New York’s spending totalled $14 billion in 2011, while spending in Los Angeles was $40 billion.

Leitch’s take on the industry, which employs 20,000 people directly in B.C., was less rosy than that painted by Chong, whose ministry cited BC Film Commission data showing film and television expenditures in 2011 topped $1.188 billion.

It said a total of 281 productions were undertaken in B.C. in 2011 (35 more than in 2010), including 134 foreign productions, with 58 feature films, 24 television series, 25 television projects and 27 animated series or projects; and 147 domestic productions including 19 feature films, 45 television series, 74 television projects and nine animated series or projects.

According to Chong’s release, television series ($504 million) and feature films ($447 million) provided the most production activity for 2011.

The ministry said foreign feature film activity for 2011 increased 55 per cent over 2010 to $430 million, but that domestic production spending decreased to $209 million in 2011 from $244 million in 2010.

Leitch said that while the industry is committed to working with government to ensure B.C. success, Ontario and Quebec have been “very aggressive” in terms of adding new tax incentives in 2010 that B.C. didn’t match. He said overall credits in Eastern Canada are 20 to 25 per cent higher than B.C.

Then again, he added: “We’ve got fantastic locations, a great crew base, over $1 billion in infrastructure and the top visual effects companies are located here.”

The ministry said that film, television and animation projects produced in B.C. in 2011 include: Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn; Superman: Man of Steel; Elysium; Foreverland; The Grey; Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol; Arctic Air; Alcatraz; Sanctuary S.4; Once Upon a Time; Real Housewives of Vancouver; Consumed; Bob’s Burgers; League of Super Evil S.3; and Thomas and Friends.

As well, B.C. has more than 600 digital media companies employing 16,000 people and generating $2.3 billion in annual sales.

Chong said the government promotes B.C.’s film industry with nearly $200 million in tax credits and funding for the BC Film Commission, which is part of her ministry, BC Film + Media and regional film commissions.

Meanwhile, Spencer Chandra Herbert, NDP critic for tourism, culture and the arts whose responsibilities include the film industry, said there’s been a steady decline in domestic productions in B.C.

“Losing out as Canada’s top film production destination is a big concern. We know Ontario has been very aggressive. I’ve called for action, as has the industry, but [the government] hasn’t responded.”

Although Chong couldn’t be reached for further comment Monday, BC Film Commissioner Susan Croome agreed that Ontario’s tax credits are more generous because, unlike B.C., that province pays tax incentives on things other than local labour costs.

“We have a really good tax credit system,” added Croome, “and we have great clients who come back again and again.”

Croome said Ontario moved ahead of B.C. because its share of domestic production spending grew significantly in 2011.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Front Page, Industry News

B.C.’s overall ranking drops despite rise in 2011 film and TV spending

Ontario has overtaken B.C. as a film and television production centre in Canada for the first time in many years despite overall spending on the west coast increasing 16 per cent in 2011 to nearly $1.2 billion.

Community, sport and Cultural Development Minister Ida Chong painted a rosy picture of the industry in a release issued Monday that said production spending last year was up $167 million over 2010.

“B.C. shines as a hub for film and TV production,” said Chong in a statement. “The industry provides good jobs for British Columbians and helps promote B.C.’s unique identity as a great place to live, work and invest.

“We will continue to support the success of film and TV through strategic tax credits, as well as funding for organizations that help filmmakers do business in our province.”

However, B.C.’s overall ranking as a North American production centre dropped from third to fourth place last year, with Ontario beating out B.C. in the rankings for the first time since 1997, except for 2004 when it also beat out B.C.

“It was a decent year for foreign production, but domestic production continues to decrease,” said Peter Leitch, chair of the Motion Picture Production Industry Association of B.C. “And we’re fighting against a more competitive tax credit in Ontario.

“We’re seeing the results of that in 2011 and that’s why we’re No. 4 now instead of No. 3.

Leitch said Ontario’s production spending of $1.265 billion was slightly higher than B.C.’s. New York’s spending totalled $14 billion in 2011, while spending in Los Angeles was $40 billion.

Leitch’s take on the industry, which employs 20,000 people directly in B.C., was less rosy than that painted by Chong, whose ministry cited BC Film Commission data showing film and television expenditures in 2011 topped $1.188 billion.

It said a total of 281 productions were undertaken in B.C. in 2011 (35 more than in 2010), including 134 foreign productions, with 58 feature films, 24 television series, 25 television projects and 27 animated series or projects; and 147 domestic productions including 19 feature films, 45 television series, 74 television projects and nine animated series or projects.

According to Chong’s release, television series ($504 million) and feature films ($447 million) provided the most production activity for 2011.

The ministry said foreign feature film activity for 2011 increased 55 per cent over 2010 to $430 million, but that domestic production spending decreased to $209 million in 2011 from $244 million in 2010.

Leitch said that while the industry is committed to working with government to ensure B.C. success, Ontario and Quebec have been “very aggressive” in terms of adding new tax incentives in 2010 that B.C. didn’t match. He said overall credits in Eastern Canada are 20 to 25 per cent higher than B.C.

Then again, he added: “We’ve got fantastic locations, a great crew base, over $1 billion in infrastructure and the top visual effects companies are located here.”

The ministry said that film, television and animation projects produced in B.C. in 2011 include: Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn; Superman: Man of Steel; Elysium; Foreverland; The Grey; Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol; Arctic Air; Alcatraz; Sanctuary S.4; Once Upon a Time; Real Housewives of Vancouver; Consumed; Bob’s Burgers; League of Super Evil S.3; and Thomas and Friends.

As well, B.C. has more than 600 digital media companies employing 16,000 people and generating $2.3 billion in annual sales.

Chong said the government promotes B.C.’s film industry with nearly $200 million in tax credits and funding for the BC Film Commission, which is part of her ministry, BC Film + Media and regional film commissions.

Meanwhile, Spencer Chandra Herbert, NDP critic for tourism, culture and the arts whose responsibilities include the film industry, said there’s been a steady decline in domestic productions in B.C.

“Losing out as Canada’s top film production destination is a big concern. We know Ontario has been very aggressive. I’ve called for action, as has the industry, but [the government] hasn’t responded.”

Although Chong couldn’t be reached for further comment Monday, BC Film Commissioner Susan Croome agreed that Ontario’s tax credits are more generous because, unlike B.C., that province pays tax incentives on things other than local labour costs.

“We have a really good tax credit system,” added Croome, “and we have great clients who come back again and again.”

Croome said Ontario moved ahead of B.C. because its share of domestic production spending grew significantly in 2011.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

B.C.’s overall ranking drops despite rise in 2011 film and TV spending

Ontario has overtaken B.C. as a film and television production centre in Canada for the first time in many years despite overall spending on the west coast increasing 16 per cent in 2011 to nearly $1.2 billion.

Community, sport and Cultural Development Minister Ida Chong painted a rosy picture of the industry in a release issued Monday that said production spending last year was up $167 million over 2010.

“B.C. shines as a hub for film and TV production,” said Chong in a statement. “The industry provides good jobs for British Columbians and helps promote B.C.’s unique identity as a great place to live, work and invest.

“We will continue to support the success of film and TV through strategic tax credits, as well as funding for organizations that help filmmakers do business in our province.”

However, B.C.’s overall ranking as a North American production centre dropped from third to fourth place last year, with Ontario beating out B.C. in the rankings for the first time since 1997, except for 2004 when it also beat out B.C.

“It was a decent year for foreign production, but domestic production continues to decrease,” said Peter Leitch, chair of the Motion Picture Production Industry Association of B.C. “And we’re fighting against a more competitive tax credit in Ontario.

“We’re seeing the results of that in 2011 and that’s why we’re No. 4 now instead of No. 3.

Leitch said Ontario’s production spending of $1.265 billion was slightly higher than B.C.’s. New York’s spending totalled $14 billion in 2011, while spending in Los Angeles was $40 billion.

Leitch’s take on the industry, which employs 20,000 people directly in B.C., was less rosy than that painted by Chong, whose ministry cited BC Film Commission data showing film and television expenditures in 2011 topped $1.188 billion.

It said a total of 281 productions were undertaken in B.C. in 2011 (35 more than in 2010), including 134 foreign productions, with 58 feature films, 24 television series, 25 television projects and 27 animated series or projects; and 147 domestic productions including 19 feature films, 45 television series, 74 television projects and nine animated series or projects.

According to Chong’s release, television series ($504 million) and feature films ($447 million) provided the most production activity for 2011.

The ministry said foreign feature film activity for 2011 increased 55 per cent over 2010 to $430 million, but that domestic production spending decreased to $209 million in 2011 from $244 million in 2010.

Leitch said that while the industry is committed to working with government to ensure B.C. success, Ontario and Quebec have been “very aggressive” in terms of adding new tax incentives in 2010 that B.C. didn’t match. He said overall credits in Eastern Canada are 20 to 25 per cent higher than B.C.

Then again, he added: “We’ve got fantastic locations, a great crew base, over $1 billion in infrastructure and the top visual effects companies are located here.”

The ministry said that film, television and animation projects produced in B.C. in 2011 include: Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn; Superman: Man of Steel; Elysium; Foreverland; The Grey; Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol; Arctic Air; Alcatraz; Sanctuary S.4; Once Upon a Time; Real Housewives of Vancouver; Consumed; Bob’s Burgers; League of Super Evil S.3; and Thomas and Friends.

As well, B.C. has more than 600 digital media companies employing 16,000 people and generating $2.3 billion in annual sales.

Chong said the government promotes B.C.’s film industry with nearly $200 million in tax credits and funding for the BC Film Commission, which is part of her ministry, BC Film + Media and regional film commissions.

Meanwhile, Spencer Chandra Herbert, NDP critic for tourism, culture and the arts whose responsibilities include the film industry, said there’s been a steady decline in domestic productions in B.C.

“Losing out as Canada’s top film production destination is a big concern. We know Ontario has been very aggressive. I’ve called for action, as has the industry, but [the government] hasn’t responded.”

Although Chong couldn’t be reached for further comment Monday, BC Film Commissioner Susan Croome agreed that Ontario’s tax credits are more generous because, unlike B.C., that province pays tax incentives on things other than local labour costs.

“We have a really good tax credit system,” added Croome, “and we have great clients who come back again and again.”

Croome said Ontario moved ahead of B.C. because its share of domestic production spending grew significantly in 2011.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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