Aug 01, 2021
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Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: From anthems to tantrums

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

GE’s new brief is an American idea whose time has come. Again. GE’s dancing elephants were a delightful metaphor for innovation. But these are not delightful times. These tough times call for big stories and a strong dose of American heroism here and there. And here comes GE to save the day. GE says they polled their employees last year – manufacturing workers, researchers, and corporate managers, over 130,000 people in the U.S. – and asked them to describe the work they do at GE. The employees rose in unison and said. “…the work [we] do builds, powers, moves and cures the world.”

The Brief wonders, is that all?

Clearly, GE wants to show us what a role model they are for these times. Co-branding its television commercials with several companies from healthcare to product goods is an example of innovation – but really, who comes out on top? Watch and decide for yourself.

GE’s commercial has all those human elements of pride and glory, right? But The Brief has seen this strategy before. It’s not innovative. It’s what Boeing has done. And United Airlines has done. And financial institutions have done during past hard times. Because hard times call for this tone of campaign. It’s expected that everyman rises up and roars. Making this GE campaign, likely only for The Brief, too transparent and ho-hum. I miss that dancing elephant. But the elephant can’t illustrate GE putting people back to work.

And Work is the operative word for these times. When I watch this campaign I hear this. Perhaps you do too.

GE co-brands with Budweiser for the Super Bowl. An economic touchdown. Co-branding as GE did with Budweiser is likely to encourage copycats. It makes the buy so much easier to buy. But because there’s more to what brings these disparate brands together than you’d imagine – it takes a full 46-seconds to explain it and a full 31-seconds before a mention of Budweiser. In this commercial, GE comes out the winner. If this were also a Bud commercial, wouldn’t there be some babes?

But don’t let The Brief blur your enthusiasm. Watch GE’s commercial with Budweiser which opens in the GE Turbine Manufacturing plant in Schenectady, New York…

Again, (hardly sub-text), all those images of people back to work and enjoying life. Over a Bud. But this co-branding commercial only imparts that GE is America’s harbinger of hope. Excuse me, is this a political year?

The Brief wonders, is this heart-manipulating campaign of real American people just a well-made piece of propaganda for GE? Should Budweiser get its money back? It feels that way to me.

But maybe I’m angry at getting ripped off. Read on.

Do you have one of those mediocre babies?

What does your baby do? Burp? Poop? Laugh when you make funny faces?

Don’t you just hate that? You got stuck with a mediocre baby like me. I had three of them. Not a one I could roller blade and drink Evian Water with.



Or, discuss my investments and financial future on E*TRADE. *



In hard times, leave ’em laughing.


Sources of Inspiration:
* http://www.ge.com/ca/en/

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

http://to411daily.com/catalog/the-brief/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: From anthems to tantrums

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

GE’s new brief is an American idea whose time has come. Again. GE’s dancing elephants were a delightful metaphor for innovation. But these are not delightful times. These tough times call for big stories and a strong dose of American heroism here and there. And here comes GE to save the day. GE says they polled their employees last year – manufacturing workers, researchers, and corporate managers, over 130,000 people in the U.S. – and asked them to describe the work they do at GE. The employees rose in unison and said. “…the work [we] do builds, powers, moves and cures the world.”

The Brief wonders, is that all?

Clearly, GE wants to show us what a role model they are for these times. Co-branding its television commercials with several companies from healthcare to product goods is an example of innovation – but really, who comes out on top? Watch and decide for yourself.

GE’s commercial has all those human elements of pride and glory, right? But The Brief has seen this strategy before. It’s not innovative. It’s what Boeing has done. And United Airlines has done. And financial institutions have done during past hard times. Because hard times call for this tone of campaign. It’s expected that everyman rises up and roars. Making this GE campaign, likely only for The Brief, too transparent and ho-hum. I miss that dancing elephant. But the elephant can’t illustrate GE putting people back to work.

And Work is the operative word for these times. When I watch this campaign I hear this. Perhaps you do too.

GE co-brands with Budweiser for the Super Bowl. An economic touchdown. Co-branding as GE did with Budweiser is likely to encourage copycats. It makes the buy so much easier to buy. But because there’s more to what brings these disparate brands together than you’d imagine – it takes a full 46-seconds to explain it and a full 31-seconds before a mention of Budweiser. In this commercial, GE comes out the winner. If this were also a Bud commercial, wouldn’t there be some babes?

But don’t let The Brief blur your enthusiasm. Watch GE’s commercial with Budweiser which opens in the GE Turbine Manufacturing plant in Schenectady, New York…

Again, (hardly sub-text), all those images of people back to work and enjoying life. Over a Bud. But this co-branding commercial only imparts that GE is America’s harbinger of hope. Excuse me, is this a political year?

The Brief wonders, is this heart-manipulating campaign of real American people just a well-made piece of propaganda for GE? Should Budweiser get its money back? It feels that way to me.

But maybe I’m angry at getting ripped off. Read on.

Do you have one of those mediocre babies?

What does your baby do? Burp? Poop? Laugh when you make funny faces?

Don’t you just hate that? You got stuck with a mediocre baby like me. I had three of them. Not a one I could roller blade and drink Evian Water with.



Or, discuss my investments and financial future on E*TRADE. *



In hard times, leave ’em laughing.


Sources of Inspiration:
* http://www.ge.com/ca/en/

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

http://to411daily.com/catalog/the-brief/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: From anthems to tantrums

By TO411Daily Columnist
Linda Chandler

GE’s new brief is an American idea whose time has come. Again. GE’s dancing elephants were a delightful metaphor for innovation. But these are not delightful times. These tough times call for big stories and a strong dose of American heroism here and there. And here comes GE to save the day. GE says they polled their employees last year – manufacturing workers, researchers, and corporate managers, over 130,000 people in the U.S. – and asked them to describe the work they do at GE. The employees rose in unison and said. “…the work [we] do builds, powers, moves and cures the world.”

The Brief wonders, is that all?

Clearly, GE wants to show us what a role model they are for these times. Co-branding its television commercials with several companies from healthcare to product goods is an example of innovation – but really, who comes out on top? Watch and decide for yourself.

GE’s commercial has all those human elements of pride and glory, right? But The Brief has seen this strategy before. It’s not innovative. It’s what Boeing has done. And United Airlines has done. And financial institutions have done during past hard times. Because hard times call for this tone of campaign. It’s expected that everyman rises up and roars. Making this GE campaign, likely only for The Brief, too transparent and ho-hum. I miss that dancing elephant. But the elephant can’t illustrate GE putting people back to work.

And Work is the operative word for these times. When I watch this campaign I hear this. Perhaps you do too.

GE co-brands with Budweiser for the Super Bowl. An economic touchdown. Co-branding as GE did with Budweiser is likely to encourage copycats. It makes the buy so much easier to buy. But because there’s more to what brings these disparate brands together than you’d imagine – it takes a full 46-seconds to explain it and a full 31-seconds before a mention of Budweiser. In this commercial, GE comes out the winner. If this were also a Bud commercial, wouldn’t there be some babes?

But don’t let The Brief blur your enthusiasm. Watch GE’s commercial with Budweiser which opens in the GE Turbine Manufacturing plant in Schenectady, New York…

Again, (hardly sub-text), all those images of people back to work and enjoying life. Over a Bud. But this co-branding commercial only imparts that GE is America’s harbinger of hope. Excuse me, is this a political year?

The Brief wonders, is this heart-manipulating campaign of real American people just a well-made piece of propaganda for GE? Should Budweiser get its money back? It feels that way to me.

But maybe I’m angry at getting ripped off. Read on.

Do you have one of those mediocre babies?

What does your baby do? Burp? Poop? Laugh when you make funny faces?

Don’t you just hate that? You got stuck with a mediocre baby like me. I had three of them. Not a one I could roller blade and drink Evian Water with.



Or, discuss my investments and financial future on E*TRADE. *



In hard times, leave ’em laughing.


Sources of Inspiration:
* http://www.ge.com/ca/en/

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

http://to411daily.com/catalog/the-brief/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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