Oct 22, 2021
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Front Page, Industry News

Cream of Calgary’s film and TV crop vie for Rosies

It’s gearing up to be a battle between deadly burlesque dancers, aboriginal comedians, earnest ranchers and a troubled native community when the Rosies return to Calgary for the first time in a decade this May.

Finalists for the 2012 Alberta Film & Television Awards were announced Wednesday in downtown Calgary, celebrating the best in homegrown Alberta film, television and new media.

Calgary productions and industry workers earned the usual impressive haul this year, but the Edmonton-shot, half-hour series Caution: May Contain Nuts, reigned with 12 nominations.

The Calgary-based CBC family drama Heartland and Edmonton-shot Blackstone reeled in 10 nominations each, as did the as-yet unre-leased Calgary-shot campy comedy The Burlesque Assassins, directed by Jonathan Joffe.

Hell on Wheels, the AMC western series that begins shooting its second season this month, received five nominations, including a nod for best dramatic series.

Entries were up this year, with 256 for class categories that cover Alberta productions and 382 craft entries for film professionals. They were whittled down to finalists in 22 class and 29 craft categories.

“The film and television industry is basically feast or famine,” said Bill Evans, executive director of the Alberta Media Production Industries Association.

“It’s been a couple years of famine, but we’re starting to see things come back. We’re really encouraged to see shows like Hell on Wheels being shot here. That show is a very expensive show and has a whole lot of spinoff in terms of jobs, hotel rooms and restaurants. So it has a lot of economic benefit for Calgary.”

Hell on Wheels’ five nominations helped Calgary based production company Nomadic Picture tie in its lead for the most nominations at 16. Calgary-based Joe Media also received 16. Nomadic Pictures dominated the made-fortv movie or miniseries category with all three nominations, including Dear Santa, Hannah’s Law and The Truth Below.

Calgary set designer John Blackie got a nod for Hannah’s Law, but not for his stunning work on Hell on Wheels, where he helped transform parts of the Tsuu T’ina Nation into a filthy tent city. Alberta actors Gerald Auger and Duncan Ollerenshaw were both nominated for best performance by an Alberta actor for their work in Hell on Wheels. Wendy Partridge received a nod for best-costume design and a best editor nomination was received by Bridget Durnford for their work on the show.

The Calgary nominations this year featured both Rosie mainstays and newcomers. The former included 10 nods for CBC’s Heartland, which has now run for five seasons. CBC has yet to confirm whether there will be a sixth, said producer Jordy Randall.

Nevertheless, the show’s haul of nominations included nods for best dramatic series, best actor for Shaun Johnston and best director nods for Dean Bennett and Grant Harvey.

“If you can keep getting those kind of nominations and operating at a high level, that’s our mission,” Randall says. “There’s so talented people on the show that are talented on a national level, but we are lucky to have them because they live here.”

The Burlesque Assassins, an ambitious Calgary-shot period comedy that has yet to be released, netted an impressive 10 nominations, including for best feature, director and screenwriting nods for Joffe.

“It’s great to see all of those people who busted their butts for not-competitive wages (get recognized),” Joffe said. “What we couldn’t pay in wages, we hopefully made up for with the challenge of the work and ownership of the project. To see all those people get nominated and for a lot of them the first time they were in that position, that’s a good sign.

“It’s a sign that we trusted the right people.”

Lloyd the Conqueror, another Calgary comedy, received seven nominations, including for best feature, best director and best screenplay for Mike Peterson.

To qualify for a Rosie, a production must be at least co-produced by a Alberta production company. A craftsperson must have been a resident of Alberta for the 2011 calendar year.

Two additional awards will also be presented. The Friend of the Industry Award will be given to William F. White’s Paul Roscorla and Paul Bronfman and an Award of Distinction will be presented to former Premier Peter Lougheed and his wife, Jeanne. The Alberta Film Commission was created in 1973 under Lougheed’s premiership.

Source: Calgary Herald

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Front Page, Industry News

Cream of Calgary’s film and TV crop vie for Rosies

It’s gearing up to be a battle between deadly burlesque dancers, aboriginal comedians, earnest ranchers and a troubled native community when the Rosies return to Calgary for the first time in a decade this May.

Finalists for the 2012 Alberta Film & Television Awards were announced Wednesday in downtown Calgary, celebrating the best in homegrown Alberta film, television and new media.

Calgary productions and industry workers earned the usual impressive haul this year, but the Edmonton-shot, half-hour series Caution: May Contain Nuts, reigned with 12 nominations.

The Calgary-based CBC family drama Heartland and Edmonton-shot Blackstone reeled in 10 nominations each, as did the as-yet unre-leased Calgary-shot campy comedy The Burlesque Assassins, directed by Jonathan Joffe.

Hell on Wheels, the AMC western series that begins shooting its second season this month, received five nominations, including a nod for best dramatic series.

Entries were up this year, with 256 for class categories that cover Alberta productions and 382 craft entries for film professionals. They were whittled down to finalists in 22 class and 29 craft categories.

“The film and television industry is basically feast or famine,” said Bill Evans, executive director of the Alberta Media Production Industries Association.

“It’s been a couple years of famine, but we’re starting to see things come back. We’re really encouraged to see shows like Hell on Wheels being shot here. That show is a very expensive show and has a whole lot of spinoff in terms of jobs, hotel rooms and restaurants. So it has a lot of economic benefit for Calgary.”

Hell on Wheels’ five nominations helped Calgary based production company Nomadic Picture tie in its lead for the most nominations at 16. Calgary-based Joe Media also received 16. Nomadic Pictures dominated the made-fortv movie or miniseries category with all three nominations, including Dear Santa, Hannah’s Law and The Truth Below.

Calgary set designer John Blackie got a nod for Hannah’s Law, but not for his stunning work on Hell on Wheels, where he helped transform parts of the Tsuu T’ina Nation into a filthy tent city. Alberta actors Gerald Auger and Duncan Ollerenshaw were both nominated for best performance by an Alberta actor for their work in Hell on Wheels. Wendy Partridge received a nod for best-costume design and a best editor nomination was received by Bridget Durnford for their work on the show.

The Calgary nominations this year featured both Rosie mainstays and newcomers. The former included 10 nods for CBC’s Heartland, which has now run for five seasons. CBC has yet to confirm whether there will be a sixth, said producer Jordy Randall.

Nevertheless, the show’s haul of nominations included nods for best dramatic series, best actor for Shaun Johnston and best director nods for Dean Bennett and Grant Harvey.

“If you can keep getting those kind of nominations and operating at a high level, that’s our mission,” Randall says. “There’s so talented people on the show that are talented on a national level, but we are lucky to have them because they live here.”

The Burlesque Assassins, an ambitious Calgary-shot period comedy that has yet to be released, netted an impressive 10 nominations, including for best feature, director and screenwriting nods for Joffe.

“It’s great to see all of those people who busted their butts for not-competitive wages (get recognized),” Joffe said. “What we couldn’t pay in wages, we hopefully made up for with the challenge of the work and ownership of the project. To see all those people get nominated and for a lot of them the first time they were in that position, that’s a good sign.

“It’s a sign that we trusted the right people.”

Lloyd the Conqueror, another Calgary comedy, received seven nominations, including for best feature, best director and best screenplay for Mike Peterson.

To qualify for a Rosie, a production must be at least co-produced by a Alberta production company. A craftsperson must have been a resident of Alberta for the 2011 calendar year.

Two additional awards will also be presented. The Friend of the Industry Award will be given to William F. White’s Paul Roscorla and Paul Bronfman and an Award of Distinction will be presented to former Premier Peter Lougheed and his wife, Jeanne. The Alberta Film Commission was created in 1973 under Lougheed’s premiership.

Source: Calgary Herald

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Cream of Calgary’s film and TV crop vie for Rosies

It’s gearing up to be a battle between deadly burlesque dancers, aboriginal comedians, earnest ranchers and a troubled native community when the Rosies return to Calgary for the first time in a decade this May.

Finalists for the 2012 Alberta Film & Television Awards were announced Wednesday in downtown Calgary, celebrating the best in homegrown Alberta film, television and new media.

Calgary productions and industry workers earned the usual impressive haul this year, but the Edmonton-shot, half-hour series Caution: May Contain Nuts, reigned with 12 nominations.

The Calgary-based CBC family drama Heartland and Edmonton-shot Blackstone reeled in 10 nominations each, as did the as-yet unre-leased Calgary-shot campy comedy The Burlesque Assassins, directed by Jonathan Joffe.

Hell on Wheels, the AMC western series that begins shooting its second season this month, received five nominations, including a nod for best dramatic series.

Entries were up this year, with 256 for class categories that cover Alberta productions and 382 craft entries for film professionals. They were whittled down to finalists in 22 class and 29 craft categories.

“The film and television industry is basically feast or famine,” said Bill Evans, executive director of the Alberta Media Production Industries Association.

“It’s been a couple years of famine, but we’re starting to see things come back. We’re really encouraged to see shows like Hell on Wheels being shot here. That show is a very expensive show and has a whole lot of spinoff in terms of jobs, hotel rooms and restaurants. So it has a lot of economic benefit for Calgary.”

Hell on Wheels’ five nominations helped Calgary based production company Nomadic Picture tie in its lead for the most nominations at 16. Calgary-based Joe Media also received 16. Nomadic Pictures dominated the made-fortv movie or miniseries category with all three nominations, including Dear Santa, Hannah’s Law and The Truth Below.

Calgary set designer John Blackie got a nod for Hannah’s Law, but not for his stunning work on Hell on Wheels, where he helped transform parts of the Tsuu T’ina Nation into a filthy tent city. Alberta actors Gerald Auger and Duncan Ollerenshaw were both nominated for best performance by an Alberta actor for their work in Hell on Wheels. Wendy Partridge received a nod for best-costume design and a best editor nomination was received by Bridget Durnford for their work on the show.

The Calgary nominations this year featured both Rosie mainstays and newcomers. The former included 10 nods for CBC’s Heartland, which has now run for five seasons. CBC has yet to confirm whether there will be a sixth, said producer Jordy Randall.

Nevertheless, the show’s haul of nominations included nods for best dramatic series, best actor for Shaun Johnston and best director nods for Dean Bennett and Grant Harvey.

“If you can keep getting those kind of nominations and operating at a high level, that’s our mission,” Randall says. “There’s so talented people on the show that are talented on a national level, but we are lucky to have them because they live here.”

The Burlesque Assassins, an ambitious Calgary-shot period comedy that has yet to be released, netted an impressive 10 nominations, including for best feature, director and screenwriting nods for Joffe.

“It’s great to see all of those people who busted their butts for not-competitive wages (get recognized),” Joffe said. “What we couldn’t pay in wages, we hopefully made up for with the challenge of the work and ownership of the project. To see all those people get nominated and for a lot of them the first time they were in that position, that’s a good sign.

“It’s a sign that we trusted the right people.”

Lloyd the Conqueror, another Calgary comedy, received seven nominations, including for best feature, best director and best screenplay for Mike Peterson.

To qualify for a Rosie, a production must be at least co-produced by a Alberta production company. A craftsperson must have been a resident of Alberta for the 2011 calendar year.

Two additional awards will also be presented. The Friend of the Industry Award will be given to William F. White’s Paul Roscorla and Paul Bronfman and an Award of Distinction will be presented to former Premier Peter Lougheed and his wife, Jeanne. The Alberta Film Commission was created in 1973 under Lougheed’s premiership.

Source: Calgary Herald

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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