Sep 22, 2019
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Headline, Industry News

Saskatchewan film wins big

For only the second time, a Saskatchewan film picked up top prize at the Golden Sheaf Awards in Yorkton on Saturday night.

In what is both an historic 65th anniversary year for the Yorkton Film Festival (YFF), and a challenging year for the industry with the government’s scrapping of the Film Employment Tax Credit, it was an extra sweet victory for the people behind the winning film, To Make a Farm.

Film editor Jackie Dzuba was in Yorkton to accept the award on behalf of director Steve Suderman.

To Make a Farm tells the story of five young people who, without any agricultural background and in an age of industrial farming, decide to become small-scale farmers.

“I’m so proud of the film Steve made (and) his passion and commitment to getting the message out to the public about the environment, food and farming,” Dzuba told reporters after the win.

“What went into (this film) was this very soulful, thoughtful passion about the subject, the story, the people. It’s so thoughtful and beautiful and relevant to where we are in the word right now.”

The YFF win was particularly poignant, she said, because of the huge hit the provincial film industry has taken.

“It’s a really big deal, because there’s so much heart in the festival – because the industry is such a strong industry, and the community is such a strong base here, so to have your peers select a Saskatchewan production to be the top award in this festival is tremendous,” Dzuba said.

To Make a Farm also picked up best nature/environment documentary and the Best of Saskatchewan award.

Other winners included Lucy van Oldenbarneveld and Laura Cabott, who took home the Founder’s Award for North Boys: The Story of Jimmy and Charlie, and Ryan Mullins and Omar Majeed, who received the NFB Kathleen Shannon Award for The Frog Princes.

As expected, the awards ceremony wasn’t without its critics of the Saskatchewan government’s decision to cut the tax credit – winners and award presenters from across the country used the stage to voice their disapproval of the move. They also pledged solidarity with this province’s industry as it works to reinstate the credit or develop another solution.

Despite the shaky future for the film industry in Saskacthewan, YFF executive director Randy Goulden hailed the festival a success.

“Our goal was to celebrate and recognize what got us here, but also to provide us with the impetus for the next 65 years,” she said on Sunday as the final film screenings wound down.

“We’ll be looking at how we can move on, how we can grow- and ways to make sure Yorkton stays relevant for filmmakers.”

Source: Leader Post

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Headline, Industry News

Saskatchewan film wins big

For only the second time, a Saskatchewan film picked up top prize at the Golden Sheaf Awards in Yorkton on Saturday night.

In what is both an historic 65th anniversary year for the Yorkton Film Festival (YFF), and a challenging year for the industry with the government’s scrapping of the Film Employment Tax Credit, it was an extra sweet victory for the people behind the winning film, To Make a Farm.

Film editor Jackie Dzuba was in Yorkton to accept the award on behalf of director Steve Suderman.

To Make a Farm tells the story of five young people who, without any agricultural background and in an age of industrial farming, decide to become small-scale farmers.

“I’m so proud of the film Steve made (and) his passion and commitment to getting the message out to the public about the environment, food and farming,” Dzuba told reporters after the win.

“What went into (this film) was this very soulful, thoughtful passion about the subject, the story, the people. It’s so thoughtful and beautiful and relevant to where we are in the word right now.”

The YFF win was particularly poignant, she said, because of the huge hit the provincial film industry has taken.

“It’s a really big deal, because there’s so much heart in the festival – because the industry is such a strong industry, and the community is such a strong base here, so to have your peers select a Saskatchewan production to be the top award in this festival is tremendous,” Dzuba said.

To Make a Farm also picked up best nature/environment documentary and the Best of Saskatchewan award.

Other winners included Lucy van Oldenbarneveld and Laura Cabott, who took home the Founder’s Award for North Boys: The Story of Jimmy and Charlie, and Ryan Mullins and Omar Majeed, who received the NFB Kathleen Shannon Award for The Frog Princes.

As expected, the awards ceremony wasn’t without its critics of the Saskatchewan government’s decision to cut the tax credit – winners and award presenters from across the country used the stage to voice their disapproval of the move. They also pledged solidarity with this province’s industry as it works to reinstate the credit or develop another solution.

Despite the shaky future for the film industry in Saskacthewan, YFF executive director Randy Goulden hailed the festival a success.

“Our goal was to celebrate and recognize what got us here, but also to provide us with the impetus for the next 65 years,” she said on Sunday as the final film screenings wound down.

“We’ll be looking at how we can move on, how we can grow- and ways to make sure Yorkton stays relevant for filmmakers.”

Source: Leader Post

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Headline, Industry News

Saskatchewan film wins big

For only the second time, a Saskatchewan film picked up top prize at the Golden Sheaf Awards in Yorkton on Saturday night.

In what is both an historic 65th anniversary year for the Yorkton Film Festival (YFF), and a challenging year for the industry with the government’s scrapping of the Film Employment Tax Credit, it was an extra sweet victory for the people behind the winning film, To Make a Farm.

Film editor Jackie Dzuba was in Yorkton to accept the award on behalf of director Steve Suderman.

To Make a Farm tells the story of five young people who, without any agricultural background and in an age of industrial farming, decide to become small-scale farmers.

“I’m so proud of the film Steve made (and) his passion and commitment to getting the message out to the public about the environment, food and farming,” Dzuba told reporters after the win.

“What went into (this film) was this very soulful, thoughtful passion about the subject, the story, the people. It’s so thoughtful and beautiful and relevant to where we are in the word right now.”

The YFF win was particularly poignant, she said, because of the huge hit the provincial film industry has taken.

“It’s a really big deal, because there’s so much heart in the festival – because the industry is such a strong industry, and the community is such a strong base here, so to have your peers select a Saskatchewan production to be the top award in this festival is tremendous,” Dzuba said.

To Make a Farm also picked up best nature/environment documentary and the Best of Saskatchewan award.

Other winners included Lucy van Oldenbarneveld and Laura Cabott, who took home the Founder’s Award for North Boys: The Story of Jimmy and Charlie, and Ryan Mullins and Omar Majeed, who received the NFB Kathleen Shannon Award for The Frog Princes.

As expected, the awards ceremony wasn’t without its critics of the Saskatchewan government’s decision to cut the tax credit – winners and award presenters from across the country used the stage to voice their disapproval of the move. They also pledged solidarity with this province’s industry as it works to reinstate the credit or develop another solution.

Despite the shaky future for the film industry in Saskacthewan, YFF executive director Randy Goulden hailed the festival a success.

“Our goal was to celebrate and recognize what got us here, but also to provide us with the impetus for the next 65 years,” she said on Sunday as the final film screenings wound down.

“We’ll be looking at how we can move on, how we can grow- and ways to make sure Yorkton stays relevant for filmmakers.”

Source: Leader Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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