Sep 20, 2019
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THE BRIEF: Guerillas in the midst

The Brief wanted to feature Out-of-Home marketing because it has the potential to enrich your relationships with your clients and their brand advocates. The nature of the media also allows your creative teams to colour. Like the potential sizzle of a Saturday night, guerilla sets the stage for unexpected fun and outcome. And, of course, there’s also the bottom line vast savings versus traditional media. So, all in all, grass roots medias and their toolbox of new technologies have finally made it to the adult table.

By its ephemeral nature, grassroots marketing has to have immediate impact and cause buzz. Think of immediate gratification this way: thrilled customers can hit any one of their estimated 940 million social networks. Comment over the week on their 7 billion Facebooks accounts. And proffer over 200 million tweets*. As you can imagine, this is fertile ground you’re setting your grassroots guerrilla campaign in.

Michael Gillissie, VP Sales & Operations, Grassroots Advertising says grassroots advertising, “…is the gateway to an on-line relationship.” And according to the latest Nielsen’s latest Global Trust in Advertising report, word-of-mouth recommendations and reviews, either from someone they know or a stranger’s opinions online, are the most trusted sources of information for buying decisions. The findings speak highly for information gathered through social media or other forms of user-generated content.”* Often generated from your out-of-home experiences.

So let’s explore some of your grassroots options and maybe while you’re reading the muse will arrive.

Projection Campaigns. The following is an MIA Award Winning Projections campaign Grassroots Advertising and Optiamedia did for Doritos. Basically, they “toured streets in 7 markets in Canada with 2 projectors mounted on vehicles blasting these larger than life images in high traffic locations. The projected characters were triggered by TXT messaging from consumers passing by. [Grassroots] paired up with a sampling team to give the consumer a ‘real’ taste of the product while entertaining them.”*

Unless you have been inspired with a brilliant idea, please come back. http://www.grassrootsadvertising.com/projections/doritos/

Gesture Projection: Sapporo became the buzz when Grassroots and Optiad Wall Projections created this Night Projection and Gesture Projection System that works, somewhat, like a gigantic Wii. The content will respond to triggers, (similar to Wii). Gillissie says it’s about setting up these large projectors in just the right location and then having the right Brand Ambassadors to guide people through the experience. And of course, the payoff has to be quick. Interactivity must be linked digitally so people can share their experience in real time on their social networks. Grab a Sapporo and enjoy.

The Brief encourages you to look into all the Out-Of-Home options available to your your clients. Gillissie of Grassroots Advertisings speaks of such things as Interactive Windows, Mobile Billboards, Street Teams, Chalk Art and Stencils. Just about any guerilla event you can imagine. “Campaigns can incorporate SMS & Interactive, Street Teams & Collateral Handouts, Photo Walls & Live Streaming, Large Format Gaming, Bluetooth, Portable Flags & Banners, Mobile Billboards, Sound & Vehicle Branding. Wild Postings: Looks who’s moved into the neighborhood, 50′ Dominations, Wild Tears, (which allow the consumer to tear a poster and take it home.)

Smart posters with QR codes (Quick Response codes) and NFC (Near Field Communication), SMS (Short Message Service) triggered wild projections and gesture activated window FX are what [Grassroots Advertising] is currently focusing on,” reports Gillissie, who believes that “technology will create new opportunities for out-of- home to become more personal and more accountable too.” The words ‘More accountable’ should stand out like a mermaid in a desert. Metrics that matter to the client make guerilla tactics easier to sell. And as 91% of the U.S. has a cell phone, * and 95% of cell phones have SMS capabilities, and, on average, text messages are read within four minutes.

Three more minutes, please. Please stick around and see Ralph Lauren’s London 4D virtual Fashion Show. Watch, enjoy and speak to you soon.

Sources of inspiration

Many, many thanks to Michael Gillissie of Grassroots Advertising

FYI: Parker writes: “…though traditional paid media still are trusted by a great number of consumers, their influence is on the decline. Nearly half of consumers around the world say the trust ads on TV (47%), in magazines (47%) and in newspapers (46%), but those numbers dropped by 24%, 20% and 25% respectively, in a relatively short period of time – between 2009 and 2011. 

Still, Nielsen notes that global advertising spend increased 7 percent from 2010 to 2011, driven by a 10% increase in television advertising.

Among the more marketer-driven sources for online information and advertising, company websites and permission-based emails fared well. Fifty-eight percent of global online consumers trusted information they found on a company website, and 50% trust emails they signed up to receive. 

Next up on the trust scale are search engine ads, which are trusted by 40% of those surveyed. Thirty-six percent trust online video ads, and 30% believe banner ad messages. Notably, the banner ad number has increased 27% since 2007. Sponsored ads on social networks are trusted by 36% of respondents. 

Mobile ads of various types have increased trust levels 61 percent since 2007 and 21 percent since 2009. The most trusted are display ads – both videos and banners – on tablets or smartphones, which are trusted by 30% of global respondents. Text ads on mobile phones are slightly less trusted, at 29%.

Interestingly, Nielsen found that relevance often correlated strongly with trust, suggesting that online marketers could raise trust levels by making ads more relevant

* Canadians are a smaller population and slower to adopt with over 26 m. cell phones.

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

http://to411daily.com/catalog/the-brief/

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Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Guerillas in the midst

The Brief wanted to feature Out-of-Home marketing because it has the potential to enrich your relationships with your clients and their brand advocates. The nature of the media also allows your creative teams to colour. Like the potential sizzle of a Saturday night, guerilla sets the stage for unexpected fun and outcome. And, of course, there’s also the bottom line vast savings versus traditional media. So, all in all, grass roots medias and their toolbox of new technologies have finally made it to the adult table.

By its ephemeral nature, grassroots marketing has to have immediate impact and cause buzz. Think of immediate gratification this way: thrilled customers can hit any one of their estimated 940 million social networks. Comment over the week on their 7 billion Facebooks accounts. And proffer over 200 million tweets*. As you can imagine, this is fertile ground you’re setting your grassroots guerrilla campaign in.

Michael Gillissie, VP Sales & Operations, Grassroots Advertising says grassroots advertising, “…is the gateway to an on-line relationship.” And according to the latest Nielsen’s latest Global Trust in Advertising report, word-of-mouth recommendations and reviews, either from someone they know or a stranger’s opinions online, are the most trusted sources of information for buying decisions. The findings speak highly for information gathered through social media or other forms of user-generated content.”* Often generated from your out-of-home experiences.

So let’s explore some of your grassroots options and maybe while you’re reading the muse will arrive.

Projection Campaigns. The following is an MIA Award Winning Projections campaign Grassroots Advertising and Optiamedia did for Doritos. Basically, they “toured streets in 7 markets in Canada with 2 projectors mounted on vehicles blasting these larger than life images in high traffic locations. The projected characters were triggered by TXT messaging from consumers passing by. [Grassroots] paired up with a sampling team to give the consumer a ‘real’ taste of the product while entertaining them.”*

Unless you have been inspired with a brilliant idea, please come back. http://www.grassrootsadvertising.com/projections/doritos/

Gesture Projection: Sapporo became the buzz when Grassroots and Optiad Wall Projections created this Night Projection and Gesture Projection System that works, somewhat, like a gigantic Wii. The content will respond to triggers, (similar to Wii). Gillissie says it’s about setting up these large projectors in just the right location and then having the right Brand Ambassadors to guide people through the experience. And of course, the payoff has to be quick. Interactivity must be linked digitally so people can share their experience in real time on their social networks. Grab a Sapporo and enjoy.

The Brief encourages you to look into all the Out-Of-Home options available to your your clients. Gillissie of Grassroots Advertisings speaks of such things as Interactive Windows, Mobile Billboards, Street Teams, Chalk Art and Stencils. Just about any guerilla event you can imagine. “Campaigns can incorporate SMS & Interactive, Street Teams & Collateral Handouts, Photo Walls & Live Streaming, Large Format Gaming, Bluetooth, Portable Flags & Banners, Mobile Billboards, Sound & Vehicle Branding. Wild Postings: Looks who’s moved into the neighborhood, 50′ Dominations, Wild Tears, (which allow the consumer to tear a poster and take it home.)

Smart posters with QR codes (Quick Response codes) and NFC (Near Field Communication), SMS (Short Message Service) triggered wild projections and gesture activated window FX are what [Grassroots Advertising] is currently focusing on,” reports Gillissie, who believes that “technology will create new opportunities for out-of- home to become more personal and more accountable too.” The words ‘More accountable’ should stand out like a mermaid in a desert. Metrics that matter to the client make guerilla tactics easier to sell. And as 91% of the U.S. has a cell phone, * and 95% of cell phones have SMS capabilities, and, on average, text messages are read within four minutes.

Three more minutes, please. Please stick around and see Ralph Lauren’s London 4D virtual Fashion Show. Watch, enjoy and speak to you soon.

Sources of inspiration

Many, many thanks to Michael Gillissie of Grassroots Advertising

FYI: Parker writes: “…though traditional paid media still are trusted by a great number of consumers, their influence is on the decline. Nearly half of consumers around the world say the trust ads on TV (47%), in magazines (47%) and in newspapers (46%), but those numbers dropped by 24%, 20% and 25% respectively, in a relatively short period of time – between 2009 and 2011. 

Still, Nielsen notes that global advertising spend increased 7 percent from 2010 to 2011, driven by a 10% increase in television advertising.

Among the more marketer-driven sources for online information and advertising, company websites and permission-based emails fared well. Fifty-eight percent of global online consumers trusted information they found on a company website, and 50% trust emails they signed up to receive. 

Next up on the trust scale are search engine ads, which are trusted by 40% of those surveyed. Thirty-six percent trust online video ads, and 30% believe banner ad messages. Notably, the banner ad number has increased 27% since 2007. Sponsored ads on social networks are trusted by 36% of respondents. 

Mobile ads of various types have increased trust levels 61 percent since 2007 and 21 percent since 2009. The most trusted are display ads – both videos and banners – on tablets or smartphones, which are trusted by 30% of global respondents. Text ads on mobile phones are slightly less trusted, at 29%.

Interestingly, Nielsen found that relevance often correlated strongly with trust, suggesting that online marketers could raise trust levels by making ads more relevant

* Canadians are a smaller population and slower to adopt with over 26 m. cell phones.

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

http://to411daily.com/catalog/the-brief/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

THE BRIEF: Guerillas in the midst

The Brief wanted to feature Out-of-Home marketing because it has the potential to enrich your relationships with your clients and their brand advocates. The nature of the media also allows your creative teams to colour. Like the potential sizzle of a Saturday night, guerilla sets the stage for unexpected fun and outcome. And, of course, there’s also the bottom line vast savings versus traditional media. So, all in all, grass roots medias and their toolbox of new technologies have finally made it to the adult table.

By its ephemeral nature, grassroots marketing has to have immediate impact and cause buzz. Think of immediate gratification this way: thrilled customers can hit any one of their estimated 940 million social networks. Comment over the week on their 7 billion Facebooks accounts. And proffer over 200 million tweets*. As you can imagine, this is fertile ground you’re setting your grassroots guerrilla campaign in.

Michael Gillissie, VP Sales & Operations, Grassroots Advertising says grassroots advertising, “…is the gateway to an on-line relationship.” And according to the latest Nielsen’s latest Global Trust in Advertising report, word-of-mouth recommendations and reviews, either from someone they know or a stranger’s opinions online, are the most trusted sources of information for buying decisions. The findings speak highly for information gathered through social media or other forms of user-generated content.”* Often generated from your out-of-home experiences.

So let’s explore some of your grassroots options and maybe while you’re reading the muse will arrive.

Projection Campaigns. The following is an MIA Award Winning Projections campaign Grassroots Advertising and Optiamedia did for Doritos. Basically, they “toured streets in 7 markets in Canada with 2 projectors mounted on vehicles blasting these larger than life images in high traffic locations. The projected characters were triggered by TXT messaging from consumers passing by. [Grassroots] paired up with a sampling team to give the consumer a ‘real’ taste of the product while entertaining them.”*

Unless you have been inspired with a brilliant idea, please come back. http://www.grassrootsadvertising.com/projections/doritos/

Gesture Projection: Sapporo became the buzz when Grassroots and Optiad Wall Projections created this Night Projection and Gesture Projection System that works, somewhat, like a gigantic Wii. The content will respond to triggers, (similar to Wii). Gillissie says it’s about setting up these large projectors in just the right location and then having the right Brand Ambassadors to guide people through the experience. And of course, the payoff has to be quick. Interactivity must be linked digitally so people can share their experience in real time on their social networks. Grab a Sapporo and enjoy.

The Brief encourages you to look into all the Out-Of-Home options available to your your clients. Gillissie of Grassroots Advertisings speaks of such things as Interactive Windows, Mobile Billboards, Street Teams, Chalk Art and Stencils. Just about any guerilla event you can imagine. “Campaigns can incorporate SMS & Interactive, Street Teams & Collateral Handouts, Photo Walls & Live Streaming, Large Format Gaming, Bluetooth, Portable Flags & Banners, Mobile Billboards, Sound & Vehicle Branding. Wild Postings: Looks who’s moved into the neighborhood, 50′ Dominations, Wild Tears, (which allow the consumer to tear a poster and take it home.)

Smart posters with QR codes (Quick Response codes) and NFC (Near Field Communication), SMS (Short Message Service) triggered wild projections and gesture activated window FX are what [Grassroots Advertising] is currently focusing on,” reports Gillissie, who believes that “technology will create new opportunities for out-of- home to become more personal and more accountable too.” The words ‘More accountable’ should stand out like a mermaid in a desert. Metrics that matter to the client make guerilla tactics easier to sell. And as 91% of the U.S. has a cell phone, * and 95% of cell phones have SMS capabilities, and, on average, text messages are read within four minutes.

Three more minutes, please. Please stick around and see Ralph Lauren’s London 4D virtual Fashion Show. Watch, enjoy and speak to you soon.

Sources of inspiration

Many, many thanks to Michael Gillissie of Grassroots Advertising

FYI: Parker writes: “…though traditional paid media still are trusted by a great number of consumers, their influence is on the decline. Nearly half of consumers around the world say the trust ads on TV (47%), in magazines (47%) and in newspapers (46%), but those numbers dropped by 24%, 20% and 25% respectively, in a relatively short period of time – between 2009 and 2011. 

Still, Nielsen notes that global advertising spend increased 7 percent from 2010 to 2011, driven by a 10% increase in television advertising.

Among the more marketer-driven sources for online information and advertising, company websites and permission-based emails fared well. Fifty-eight percent of global online consumers trusted information they found on a company website, and 50% trust emails they signed up to receive. 

Next up on the trust scale are search engine ads, which are trusted by 40% of those surveyed. Thirty-six percent trust online video ads, and 30% believe banner ad messages. Notably, the banner ad number has increased 27% since 2007. Sponsored ads on social networks are trusted by 36% of respondents. 

Mobile ads of various types have increased trust levels 61 percent since 2007 and 21 percent since 2009. The most trusted are display ads – both videos and banners – on tablets or smartphones, which are trusted by 30% of global respondents. Text ads on mobile phones are slightly less trusted, at 29%.

Interestingly, Nielsen found that relevance often correlated strongly with trust, suggesting that online marketers could raise trust levels by making ads more relevant

* Canadians are a smaller population and slower to adopt with over 26 m. cell phones.

—–

Comment to Linda at this address: thebrief@to411.com.
LinkedIn // Facebook // Twitter

http://to411daily.com/catalog/the-brief/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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