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TIFF announces 2012 docs, Midnight Madness, kids lineup

Docs ‘n’ shocks were front and centre as the Toronto International Film Festival unveiled its documentary and Midnight Madness line-ups.

TIFF also rolled out program announcements involving mind trips, moppets, masterpieces and Mumbai, all part of the 37th annual festival running Sept. 6-16.

TIFF Docs is the new handle for the popular Real to Reel program. This year it presents new works by Ken Burns, Alex Gibney and Julien Temple, as well as exposes about the Olympics, the Roman Catholic Church, the Middle East and entertainment figures ranging from Garth Drabinsky to Roman Polanski to Snoop Dogg.

The Central Park Five, coming to Toronto by way of Cannes, has pop documentarian Burns leading a serious investigation into the notorious case of five black and Latino teenagers who were wrongly convicted of raping a woman known as the Central Park Jogger.

Oscar winner Alex Gibney comes to Toronto with Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, his world-premiering probe into the abuse of power within the Catholic Church. He tracks a cover-up trail that winds from Milwaukee to Ireland right to the highest Vatican office.

Sex Pistols’ chronicler Julien Temple aims his blood-shot eye and witty mind at his English hometown in London – The Modern Babylon. Featuring musicians, writers, artists and “dangerous thinkers,” it’s a time-travelling saga billed as “the story of London’s immigrants, its bohemians and how together they changed the city forever.”

Three docs dip into the cauldron of Middle East politics: Dror Moreh’s The Gatekeepers, Dan Setton’s State 194 and Mahdi Fleifel’s A World Not Ours.

A very timely TIFF Docs entry is 9.79*, by Daniel Gordon, which examines Ben Johnson’s controversial 100-metre sprint at the 1988 Seoul Olympics, which briefly earned the runner a gold medal and world record before a steroid ruling led him to scandal. All eight athletes in the race tell their story for the first time.

Show Stopper: The Theatrical Life of Garth Drabinsky continues Toronto documentarian Barry Avrich’s series of close-ups of entertainment moguls who usually don’t like having the lens aimed their way. Other arty types getting the documentary gaze include director Roman Polanski (Roman Polanski: Odd Man Out, Marina Zenovich), rapper Snoop Dogg (Reincarnated, Andrew Capper) and playwright Sam Shepard (Shepard and Dark, Treva Wurmfeld).

Such eclectic topics as mass murderers (The Act of Killing, Joshua Oppenheimer), drug dealers (How to Make Money Selling Drugs, Matthew Cooke), moon worshippers (Lunarcy!, Simon Ennis), disco dancers (The Secret Disco Revolution, Jamie Kastner), underground dwellers (No Place on Earth, Janet Tobias) and wild surfers (Storm Surfers 3D, Christopher Nelius and Justin McMillan) help round out the docs schedule.

Two well-known Canadian directors have docs in other sections: Denis Cote brings Bestiaire, a “filmic picture book,” to the free-form Wavelengths program; while Peter Mettler’s essays The End of Time are in the Masters lineup.

Genre freaks and geeks of every age and orientation always thrill to the Midnight Madness program, once again curated by Colin Geddes, TIFF’s nabob of nightmares.

His blood-spattered board includes such highlights as world-premiering The ABCs of Death, a 26-director anthology in which each letter of the alphabet sparks invitations to mayhem. This “alphabetical arsenal of destruction” includes such MM-approved directors as Ben Wheatley (Kill List), Ti West (House of the Devil), Jason Eisener (Hobo With A Shotgun), Adam Wingard (You’re Next) and Xavier Gens (Frontières).

Big Hollywood names enliven Seven Psychopaths, Martin McDonagh’s comedy about a struggling screenwriter (Colin Farrell) caught in L.A.’s underworld, after his goofball pals (Christopher Walken and Sam Rockwell) kidnap the pet doggie of a gangster (Woody Harrelson).

Seven Psychopaths is world premiering, as are earthquake chiller Aftershock (Nicolas Lopez) and disease thriller The Bay (Barry Levinson).

Geddes this year also curates the Vanguard program, “a bold and dangerous world where genre meets art house cinema.”

He sees it as the place where Midnight Madness devotees graduate to:

“Vanguard is for the audience that has grown up with Midnight Madness and need something a little more sophisticated, but still edgy, dark, dangerous and sometimes sexy . . . I like to describe the series as being like Midnight Madness’s cool older mature sister!”

Featured titles year include the Sundance and Cannes sensation Room 237, Rodney Ascher’s exploration of fan obsessions that Stanley Kubrick hid secret messages in The Shining, his 1980 horror film.

Other Vanguard highlights include Berberian Sound Studio (Peter Strickland), a set-in-1976 story of horror movie sound mix that gets all too real; and Sightseers (Ben Wheatley), a caravan trip through the British Isles that also becomes an erotic odyssey and killing spree.

TIFF Kids often features smaller films from around the world for small fry, but there’s a distinctly Hollywood feel this year. Two world premieres amongst the offerings including Hotel Transylvania, an animated comedy about a hotel run by Count Dracula for his fellow monsters, without human interference – until one dumb mortal stumbles in. Much of it was filmed in Vancouver, and voice talent includes Adam Sandler, Andy Samberg, Selena Gomez, Kevin James and Fran Drescher. Another hot kidpic is Finding Nemo 3D, the big Pixar aquatic splash, now in the third dimension.

The festival always features vault classics. This year it expands the idea with the new TIFF Cinematheque program, which will feature such masterpieces as Alfred Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, Roman Polanski’s Tess, and also such rarities as Roberto Rossellini’s Stromboli and the multi-director Vietnam dialectic Loin du Vietnam (Joris Ivens, William Klein, Claude Lelouch, Agnès Varda, Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, Alain Resnais).

Mumbai is the focus of the City to City program, curated by TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey, and a big two-part crime saga dominates the 10-feature line-up: Gangs of Wasseypur, a decades-spanning gangster epic set during the riotous era of Indian independence and industrialization. It stars Manoj Bajpayee, Richa Chadda and Reema Sen, and comes to Toronto by way of the Director’s Fortnight at Cannes.

Source: The Toronto Star

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Front Page, Industry News

TIFF announces 2012 docs, Midnight Madness, kids lineup

Docs ‘n’ shocks were front and centre as the Toronto International Film Festival unveiled its documentary and Midnight Madness line-ups.

TIFF also rolled out program announcements involving mind trips, moppets, masterpieces and Mumbai, all part of the 37th annual festival running Sept. 6-16.

TIFF Docs is the new handle for the popular Real to Reel program. This year it presents new works by Ken Burns, Alex Gibney and Julien Temple, as well as exposes about the Olympics, the Roman Catholic Church, the Middle East and entertainment figures ranging from Garth Drabinsky to Roman Polanski to Snoop Dogg.

The Central Park Five, coming to Toronto by way of Cannes, has pop documentarian Burns leading a serious investigation into the notorious case of five black and Latino teenagers who were wrongly convicted of raping a woman known as the Central Park Jogger.

Oscar winner Alex Gibney comes to Toronto with Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, his world-premiering probe into the abuse of power within the Catholic Church. He tracks a cover-up trail that winds from Milwaukee to Ireland right to the highest Vatican office.

Sex Pistols’ chronicler Julien Temple aims his blood-shot eye and witty mind at his English hometown in London – The Modern Babylon. Featuring musicians, writers, artists and “dangerous thinkers,” it’s a time-travelling saga billed as “the story of London’s immigrants, its bohemians and how together they changed the city forever.”

Three docs dip into the cauldron of Middle East politics: Dror Moreh’s The Gatekeepers, Dan Setton’s State 194 and Mahdi Fleifel’s A World Not Ours.

A very timely TIFF Docs entry is 9.79*, by Daniel Gordon, which examines Ben Johnson’s controversial 100-metre sprint at the 1988 Seoul Olympics, which briefly earned the runner a gold medal and world record before a steroid ruling led him to scandal. All eight athletes in the race tell their story for the first time.

Show Stopper: The Theatrical Life of Garth Drabinsky continues Toronto documentarian Barry Avrich’s series of close-ups of entertainment moguls who usually don’t like having the lens aimed their way. Other arty types getting the documentary gaze include director Roman Polanski (Roman Polanski: Odd Man Out, Marina Zenovich), rapper Snoop Dogg (Reincarnated, Andrew Capper) and playwright Sam Shepard (Shepard and Dark, Treva Wurmfeld).

Such eclectic topics as mass murderers (The Act of Killing, Joshua Oppenheimer), drug dealers (How to Make Money Selling Drugs, Matthew Cooke), moon worshippers (Lunarcy!, Simon Ennis), disco dancers (The Secret Disco Revolution, Jamie Kastner), underground dwellers (No Place on Earth, Janet Tobias) and wild surfers (Storm Surfers 3D, Christopher Nelius and Justin McMillan) help round out the docs schedule.

Two well-known Canadian directors have docs in other sections: Denis Cote brings Bestiaire, a “filmic picture book,” to the free-form Wavelengths program; while Peter Mettler’s essays The End of Time are in the Masters lineup.

Genre freaks and geeks of every age and orientation always thrill to the Midnight Madness program, once again curated by Colin Geddes, TIFF’s nabob of nightmares.

His blood-spattered board includes such highlights as world-premiering The ABCs of Death, a 26-director anthology in which each letter of the alphabet sparks invitations to mayhem. This “alphabetical arsenal of destruction” includes such MM-approved directors as Ben Wheatley (Kill List), Ti West (House of the Devil), Jason Eisener (Hobo With A Shotgun), Adam Wingard (You’re Next) and Xavier Gens (Frontières).

Big Hollywood names enliven Seven Psychopaths, Martin McDonagh’s comedy about a struggling screenwriter (Colin Farrell) caught in L.A.’s underworld, after his goofball pals (Christopher Walken and Sam Rockwell) kidnap the pet doggie of a gangster (Woody Harrelson).

Seven Psychopaths is world premiering, as are earthquake chiller Aftershock (Nicolas Lopez) and disease thriller The Bay (Barry Levinson).

Geddes this year also curates the Vanguard program, “a bold and dangerous world where genre meets art house cinema.”

He sees it as the place where Midnight Madness devotees graduate to:

“Vanguard is for the audience that has grown up with Midnight Madness and need something a little more sophisticated, but still edgy, dark, dangerous and sometimes sexy . . . I like to describe the series as being like Midnight Madness’s cool older mature sister!”

Featured titles year include the Sundance and Cannes sensation Room 237, Rodney Ascher’s exploration of fan obsessions that Stanley Kubrick hid secret messages in The Shining, his 1980 horror film.

Other Vanguard highlights include Berberian Sound Studio (Peter Strickland), a set-in-1976 story of horror movie sound mix that gets all too real; and Sightseers (Ben Wheatley), a caravan trip through the British Isles that also becomes an erotic odyssey and killing spree.

TIFF Kids often features smaller films from around the world for small fry, but there’s a distinctly Hollywood feel this year. Two world premieres amongst the offerings including Hotel Transylvania, an animated comedy about a hotel run by Count Dracula for his fellow monsters, without human interference – until one dumb mortal stumbles in. Much of it was filmed in Vancouver, and voice talent includes Adam Sandler, Andy Samberg, Selena Gomez, Kevin James and Fran Drescher. Another hot kidpic is Finding Nemo 3D, the big Pixar aquatic splash, now in the third dimension.

The festival always features vault classics. This year it expands the idea with the new TIFF Cinematheque program, which will feature such masterpieces as Alfred Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, Roman Polanski’s Tess, and also such rarities as Roberto Rossellini’s Stromboli and the multi-director Vietnam dialectic Loin du Vietnam (Joris Ivens, William Klein, Claude Lelouch, Agnès Varda, Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, Alain Resnais).

Mumbai is the focus of the City to City program, curated by TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey, and a big two-part crime saga dominates the 10-feature line-up: Gangs of Wasseypur, a decades-spanning gangster epic set during the riotous era of Indian independence and industrialization. It stars Manoj Bajpayee, Richa Chadda and Reema Sen, and comes to Toronto by way of the Director’s Fortnight at Cannes.

Source: The Toronto Star

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You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

TIFF announces 2012 docs, Midnight Madness, kids lineup

Docs ‘n’ shocks were front and centre as the Toronto International Film Festival unveiled its documentary and Midnight Madness line-ups.

TIFF also rolled out program announcements involving mind trips, moppets, masterpieces and Mumbai, all part of the 37th annual festival running Sept. 6-16.

TIFF Docs is the new handle for the popular Real to Reel program. This year it presents new works by Ken Burns, Alex Gibney and Julien Temple, as well as exposes about the Olympics, the Roman Catholic Church, the Middle East and entertainment figures ranging from Garth Drabinsky to Roman Polanski to Snoop Dogg.

The Central Park Five, coming to Toronto by way of Cannes, has pop documentarian Burns leading a serious investigation into the notorious case of five black and Latino teenagers who were wrongly convicted of raping a woman known as the Central Park Jogger.

Oscar winner Alex Gibney comes to Toronto with Mea Maxima Culpa: Silence in the House of God, his world-premiering probe into the abuse of power within the Catholic Church. He tracks a cover-up trail that winds from Milwaukee to Ireland right to the highest Vatican office.

Sex Pistols’ chronicler Julien Temple aims his blood-shot eye and witty mind at his English hometown in London – The Modern Babylon. Featuring musicians, writers, artists and “dangerous thinkers,” it’s a time-travelling saga billed as “the story of London’s immigrants, its bohemians and how together they changed the city forever.”

Three docs dip into the cauldron of Middle East politics: Dror Moreh’s The Gatekeepers, Dan Setton’s State 194 and Mahdi Fleifel’s A World Not Ours.

A very timely TIFF Docs entry is 9.79*, by Daniel Gordon, which examines Ben Johnson’s controversial 100-metre sprint at the 1988 Seoul Olympics, which briefly earned the runner a gold medal and world record before a steroid ruling led him to scandal. All eight athletes in the race tell their story for the first time.

Show Stopper: The Theatrical Life of Garth Drabinsky continues Toronto documentarian Barry Avrich’s series of close-ups of entertainment moguls who usually don’t like having the lens aimed their way. Other arty types getting the documentary gaze include director Roman Polanski (Roman Polanski: Odd Man Out, Marina Zenovich), rapper Snoop Dogg (Reincarnated, Andrew Capper) and playwright Sam Shepard (Shepard and Dark, Treva Wurmfeld).

Such eclectic topics as mass murderers (The Act of Killing, Joshua Oppenheimer), drug dealers (How to Make Money Selling Drugs, Matthew Cooke), moon worshippers (Lunarcy!, Simon Ennis), disco dancers (The Secret Disco Revolution, Jamie Kastner), underground dwellers (No Place on Earth, Janet Tobias) and wild surfers (Storm Surfers 3D, Christopher Nelius and Justin McMillan) help round out the docs schedule.

Two well-known Canadian directors have docs in other sections: Denis Cote brings Bestiaire, a “filmic picture book,” to the free-form Wavelengths program; while Peter Mettler’s essays The End of Time are in the Masters lineup.

Genre freaks and geeks of every age and orientation always thrill to the Midnight Madness program, once again curated by Colin Geddes, TIFF’s nabob of nightmares.

His blood-spattered board includes such highlights as world-premiering The ABCs of Death, a 26-director anthology in which each letter of the alphabet sparks invitations to mayhem. This “alphabetical arsenal of destruction” includes such MM-approved directors as Ben Wheatley (Kill List), Ti West (House of the Devil), Jason Eisener (Hobo With A Shotgun), Adam Wingard (You’re Next) and Xavier Gens (Frontières).

Big Hollywood names enliven Seven Psychopaths, Martin McDonagh’s comedy about a struggling screenwriter (Colin Farrell) caught in L.A.’s underworld, after his goofball pals (Christopher Walken and Sam Rockwell) kidnap the pet doggie of a gangster (Woody Harrelson).

Seven Psychopaths is world premiering, as are earthquake chiller Aftershock (Nicolas Lopez) and disease thriller The Bay (Barry Levinson).

Geddes this year also curates the Vanguard program, “a bold and dangerous world where genre meets art house cinema.”

He sees it as the place where Midnight Madness devotees graduate to:

“Vanguard is for the audience that has grown up with Midnight Madness and need something a little more sophisticated, but still edgy, dark, dangerous and sometimes sexy . . . I like to describe the series as being like Midnight Madness’s cool older mature sister!”

Featured titles year include the Sundance and Cannes sensation Room 237, Rodney Ascher’s exploration of fan obsessions that Stanley Kubrick hid secret messages in The Shining, his 1980 horror film.

Other Vanguard highlights include Berberian Sound Studio (Peter Strickland), a set-in-1976 story of horror movie sound mix that gets all too real; and Sightseers (Ben Wheatley), a caravan trip through the British Isles that also becomes an erotic odyssey and killing spree.

TIFF Kids often features smaller films from around the world for small fry, but there’s a distinctly Hollywood feel this year. Two world premieres amongst the offerings including Hotel Transylvania, an animated comedy about a hotel run by Count Dracula for his fellow monsters, without human interference – until one dumb mortal stumbles in. Much of it was filmed in Vancouver, and voice talent includes Adam Sandler, Andy Samberg, Selena Gomez, Kevin James and Fran Drescher. Another hot kidpic is Finding Nemo 3D, the big Pixar aquatic splash, now in the third dimension.

The festival always features vault classics. This year it expands the idea with the new TIFF Cinematheque program, which will feature such masterpieces as Alfred Hitchcock’s Dial M for Murder, Roman Polanski’s Tess, and also such rarities as Roberto Rossellini’s Stromboli and the multi-director Vietnam dialectic Loin du Vietnam (Joris Ivens, William Klein, Claude Lelouch, Agnès Varda, Jean-Luc Godard, Chris Marker, Alain Resnais).

Mumbai is the focus of the City to City program, curated by TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey, and a big two-part crime saga dominates the 10-feature line-up: Gangs of Wasseypur, a decades-spanning gangster epic set during the riotous era of Indian independence and industrialization. It stars Manoj Bajpayee, Richa Chadda and Reema Sen, and comes to Toronto by way of the Director’s Fortnight at Cannes.

Source: The Toronto Star

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