Oct 24, 2021
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Front Page, Industry News

Canadian TV production rises 21.3% to all-time high of $2.58 billion

Canadian television production had a landmark year in 2011/12 with the volume of productions hitting an all-time high and several Canadian prime-time drama series surpassing the one million audience threshold. After a decade of relatively modest growth and some instances of year-over-year declines, the Canadian television sub-sector experienced broadly based gains in production in both of the major language markets. This according to the latest figures released today in “Profile 2012: An Economic Report on the Screen-based Production Industry in Canada,” published by the Canadian Media Production Association (CMPA).

Canadian television production increased 21.3% in 2011/12, to a ten-year high of just under $2.6 billion. While both the English- and French-language markets contributed to this increase, it was English-language fiction television production that fuelled the rise in activity. In 2011/12, the volume of English-language fiction television production climbed by 41.4% to just under $1.1 billion. A large portion of this increase was due to higher average hourly budgets, rather than more projects.

Home grown Canadian productions also were the key driver in growing the screen-based production industry in 2011/12 by 5.6% to a ten-year high of $5.9 billion. In contrast, foreign location and service (FLS) production fell 10.6% in 2010/11 to $1.68 billion.

The increased level of Canadian film and television production in 2011/12 was fuelled by higher levels of both foreign financing and other private Canadian financing. The former increased by $73 million in 2011/12 and accounted for 9% of total financing, while the latter grew by $41 million and accounted for 10% of total financing. Canadian distributors also increased their investment in Canadian films and television programs, with a view to international sales. In total, these three sources added $265 million in financing to Canadian film and television production, bringing the total value of their combined annual investment to $943 million.

The report found that broadcaster in-house productions increased slightly by 1.1% in 2011/12 to $1.26 billion. Of that, $725 million was for conventional television expenditures and $537 million for specialty and pay television.

The sharp growth in 2011/12 came from a trend in producing higher-budget television series. The report notes that while the annual number of television series fluctuated from a low of 631 to a high of 724 during the last ten-year period, the funding of television series production rose 61% from $1.37 billion in 2002/03 to $2.21 billion in 2011/12.

The sharp rise in television-fiction production in 2011/12 was due less to higher numbers of television series than to higher average budgets in the English-language market. Between 2007/08 and 2011/12 nearly three-quarters of the overall increase in volume of Canadian television ($448 million) was in the fiction genre. In 2011/12, the volume of lifestyle production also grew by 29.7% to reach $297 million.

“The production of prime-time Canadian dramas such as Saving Hope, Rookie Blue and Bomb Girls underpinned the higher levels of Canadian television production, which, in turn, helped attract greater numbers of Canadian television viewers to Canadian programming, and offered the potential for increased exports of Canadian programming to other markets.”

In some genres, the higher levels of production were accompanied by higher average budgets. The average budget of English-language fiction programming climbed in the last few years. By 2011/12, it was back to $1.5 million per hour, a level it last reached in 2008/09. Average budgets for English-language children’s and youth programming also climbed steadily over the last six years. They rose from a ten-year low of $556,000 per hour in 2005/06 to $1 million per hour in 2010/11, before dipping back to $927,000 in 2011/12. In the French-language market, the average budgets in most genres were relatively stable over the past decade and “fluctuated within relatively tight ranges, rather than displaying any clear upward or downward trends.”

The increased level of Canadian film and television production in 2011/12 was fuelled by higher levels of both foreign financing and other private Canadian financing. The former increased by $73 million in 2011/12 and accounted for 9% of total financing, while the latter grew by $41 million and accounted for 10% of total financing. Canadian distributors also increased their investment in Canadian films and television programs, with a view to international sales. In total, these three sources added $265 million in financing to Canadian film and television production, bringing the total value of their combined annual investment to $943 million.

Canadian theatrical production also reached a ten-year high, climbing by 14.1% to $381 million. As was the case with Canadian television production, both language markets contributed to the increase: English-language production increased by 15.4%, while French-language production rose by 11.2%. Most of the increase in the volume of Canadian theatrical production was due to higher budgets, since the number of projects actually decreased in 2011/12. With these higher budgets came an influx of foreign financing, with the increase in production volume ($47 million) in 2011/12 nearly equivalent to the increase in the level of foreign financing of Canadian theatrical production ($55 million).

There was also a sharp rise in the percentage of Canadians using the Internet to watch video (e.g., television programs or video clips) in 2011. At the same time, the percentage of Canadians watching television over the Internet or using their cellphones to watch video also increased in 2011.

In the English-language market, the usage of the Internet for watching television programming was on par with the use of personal video recorders (PVRs) in Canada in 2011. While the share of Canadians watching video on their cellphones was above 8% in 2011, the share watching television programming on their cellphones was much lower: 3% in the French-language market and 4% in the English-language market. The use of tablet devices for watching television programming was also still quite low in 2011 at fewer than 3%.

Despite the fact that Netflix only launched its service in Canada in September 2010, by fall 2011, 10% of Canadians reported that they already held a subscription to the over-the-top video streaming service for films and television programming.

While convergent digital media production was not measured in the report the report found that there are “signs of vibrant industry activity.”

“For example, the games-development portion of the digital media production industry alone – which comprised some 348 companies – generated over $1.7 billion in economic activity and employed 15,700 Canadians in 2011.6 Convergent digital media production, as a segment of the wider digital media industry, yielded $34.6 million in production volume in 2011/12.”

Source: Cartt

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Front Page, Industry News

Canadian TV production rises 21.3% to all-time high of $2.58 billion

Canadian television production had a landmark year in 2011/12 with the volume of productions hitting an all-time high and several Canadian prime-time drama series surpassing the one million audience threshold. After a decade of relatively modest growth and some instances of year-over-year declines, the Canadian television sub-sector experienced broadly based gains in production in both of the major language markets. This according to the latest figures released today in “Profile 2012: An Economic Report on the Screen-based Production Industry in Canada,” published by the Canadian Media Production Association (CMPA).

Canadian television production increased 21.3% in 2011/12, to a ten-year high of just under $2.6 billion. While both the English- and French-language markets contributed to this increase, it was English-language fiction television production that fuelled the rise in activity. In 2011/12, the volume of English-language fiction television production climbed by 41.4% to just under $1.1 billion. A large portion of this increase was due to higher average hourly budgets, rather than more projects.

Home grown Canadian productions also were the key driver in growing the screen-based production industry in 2011/12 by 5.6% to a ten-year high of $5.9 billion. In contrast, foreign location and service (FLS) production fell 10.6% in 2010/11 to $1.68 billion.

The increased level of Canadian film and television production in 2011/12 was fuelled by higher levels of both foreign financing and other private Canadian financing. The former increased by $73 million in 2011/12 and accounted for 9% of total financing, while the latter grew by $41 million and accounted for 10% of total financing. Canadian distributors also increased their investment in Canadian films and television programs, with a view to international sales. In total, these three sources added $265 million in financing to Canadian film and television production, bringing the total value of their combined annual investment to $943 million.

The report found that broadcaster in-house productions increased slightly by 1.1% in 2011/12 to $1.26 billion. Of that, $725 million was for conventional television expenditures and $537 million for specialty and pay television.

The sharp growth in 2011/12 came from a trend in producing higher-budget television series. The report notes that while the annual number of television series fluctuated from a low of 631 to a high of 724 during the last ten-year period, the funding of television series production rose 61% from $1.37 billion in 2002/03 to $2.21 billion in 2011/12.

The sharp rise in television-fiction production in 2011/12 was due less to higher numbers of television series than to higher average budgets in the English-language market. Between 2007/08 and 2011/12 nearly three-quarters of the overall increase in volume of Canadian television ($448 million) was in the fiction genre. In 2011/12, the volume of lifestyle production also grew by 29.7% to reach $297 million.

“The production of prime-time Canadian dramas such as Saving Hope, Rookie Blue and Bomb Girls underpinned the higher levels of Canadian television production, which, in turn, helped attract greater numbers of Canadian television viewers to Canadian programming, and offered the potential for increased exports of Canadian programming to other markets.”

In some genres, the higher levels of production were accompanied by higher average budgets. The average budget of English-language fiction programming climbed in the last few years. By 2011/12, it was back to $1.5 million per hour, a level it last reached in 2008/09. Average budgets for English-language children’s and youth programming also climbed steadily over the last six years. They rose from a ten-year low of $556,000 per hour in 2005/06 to $1 million per hour in 2010/11, before dipping back to $927,000 in 2011/12. In the French-language market, the average budgets in most genres were relatively stable over the past decade and “fluctuated within relatively tight ranges, rather than displaying any clear upward or downward trends.”

The increased level of Canadian film and television production in 2011/12 was fuelled by higher levels of both foreign financing and other private Canadian financing. The former increased by $73 million in 2011/12 and accounted for 9% of total financing, while the latter grew by $41 million and accounted for 10% of total financing. Canadian distributors also increased their investment in Canadian films and television programs, with a view to international sales. In total, these three sources added $265 million in financing to Canadian film and television production, bringing the total value of their combined annual investment to $943 million.

Canadian theatrical production also reached a ten-year high, climbing by 14.1% to $381 million. As was the case with Canadian television production, both language markets contributed to the increase: English-language production increased by 15.4%, while French-language production rose by 11.2%. Most of the increase in the volume of Canadian theatrical production was due to higher budgets, since the number of projects actually decreased in 2011/12. With these higher budgets came an influx of foreign financing, with the increase in production volume ($47 million) in 2011/12 nearly equivalent to the increase in the level of foreign financing of Canadian theatrical production ($55 million).

There was also a sharp rise in the percentage of Canadians using the Internet to watch video (e.g., television programs or video clips) in 2011. At the same time, the percentage of Canadians watching television over the Internet or using their cellphones to watch video also increased in 2011.

In the English-language market, the usage of the Internet for watching television programming was on par with the use of personal video recorders (PVRs) in Canada in 2011. While the share of Canadians watching video on their cellphones was above 8% in 2011, the share watching television programming on their cellphones was much lower: 3% in the French-language market and 4% in the English-language market. The use of tablet devices for watching television programming was also still quite low in 2011 at fewer than 3%.

Despite the fact that Netflix only launched its service in Canada in September 2010, by fall 2011, 10% of Canadians reported that they already held a subscription to the over-the-top video streaming service for films and television programming.

While convergent digital media production was not measured in the report the report found that there are “signs of vibrant industry activity.”

“For example, the games-development portion of the digital media production industry alone – which comprised some 348 companies – generated over $1.7 billion in economic activity and employed 15,700 Canadians in 2011.6 Convergent digital media production, as a segment of the wider digital media industry, yielded $34.6 million in production volume in 2011/12.”

Source: Cartt

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Canadian TV production rises 21.3% to all-time high of $2.58 billion

Canadian television production had a landmark year in 2011/12 with the volume of productions hitting an all-time high and several Canadian prime-time drama series surpassing the one million audience threshold. After a decade of relatively modest growth and some instances of year-over-year declines, the Canadian television sub-sector experienced broadly based gains in production in both of the major language markets. This according to the latest figures released today in “Profile 2012: An Economic Report on the Screen-based Production Industry in Canada,” published by the Canadian Media Production Association (CMPA).

Canadian television production increased 21.3% in 2011/12, to a ten-year high of just under $2.6 billion. While both the English- and French-language markets contributed to this increase, it was English-language fiction television production that fuelled the rise in activity. In 2011/12, the volume of English-language fiction television production climbed by 41.4% to just under $1.1 billion. A large portion of this increase was due to higher average hourly budgets, rather than more projects.

Home grown Canadian productions also were the key driver in growing the screen-based production industry in 2011/12 by 5.6% to a ten-year high of $5.9 billion. In contrast, foreign location and service (FLS) production fell 10.6% in 2010/11 to $1.68 billion.

The increased level of Canadian film and television production in 2011/12 was fuelled by higher levels of both foreign financing and other private Canadian financing. The former increased by $73 million in 2011/12 and accounted for 9% of total financing, while the latter grew by $41 million and accounted for 10% of total financing. Canadian distributors also increased their investment in Canadian films and television programs, with a view to international sales. In total, these three sources added $265 million in financing to Canadian film and television production, bringing the total value of their combined annual investment to $943 million.

The report found that broadcaster in-house productions increased slightly by 1.1% in 2011/12 to $1.26 billion. Of that, $725 million was for conventional television expenditures and $537 million for specialty and pay television.

The sharp growth in 2011/12 came from a trend in producing higher-budget television series. The report notes that while the annual number of television series fluctuated from a low of 631 to a high of 724 during the last ten-year period, the funding of television series production rose 61% from $1.37 billion in 2002/03 to $2.21 billion in 2011/12.

The sharp rise in television-fiction production in 2011/12 was due less to higher numbers of television series than to higher average budgets in the English-language market. Between 2007/08 and 2011/12 nearly three-quarters of the overall increase in volume of Canadian television ($448 million) was in the fiction genre. In 2011/12, the volume of lifestyle production also grew by 29.7% to reach $297 million.

“The production of prime-time Canadian dramas such as Saving Hope, Rookie Blue and Bomb Girls underpinned the higher levels of Canadian television production, which, in turn, helped attract greater numbers of Canadian television viewers to Canadian programming, and offered the potential for increased exports of Canadian programming to other markets.”

In some genres, the higher levels of production were accompanied by higher average budgets. The average budget of English-language fiction programming climbed in the last few years. By 2011/12, it was back to $1.5 million per hour, a level it last reached in 2008/09. Average budgets for English-language children’s and youth programming also climbed steadily over the last six years. They rose from a ten-year low of $556,000 per hour in 2005/06 to $1 million per hour in 2010/11, before dipping back to $927,000 in 2011/12. In the French-language market, the average budgets in most genres were relatively stable over the past decade and “fluctuated within relatively tight ranges, rather than displaying any clear upward or downward trends.”

The increased level of Canadian film and television production in 2011/12 was fuelled by higher levels of both foreign financing and other private Canadian financing. The former increased by $73 million in 2011/12 and accounted for 9% of total financing, while the latter grew by $41 million and accounted for 10% of total financing. Canadian distributors also increased their investment in Canadian films and television programs, with a view to international sales. In total, these three sources added $265 million in financing to Canadian film and television production, bringing the total value of their combined annual investment to $943 million.

Canadian theatrical production also reached a ten-year high, climbing by 14.1% to $381 million. As was the case with Canadian television production, both language markets contributed to the increase: English-language production increased by 15.4%, while French-language production rose by 11.2%. Most of the increase in the volume of Canadian theatrical production was due to higher budgets, since the number of projects actually decreased in 2011/12. With these higher budgets came an influx of foreign financing, with the increase in production volume ($47 million) in 2011/12 nearly equivalent to the increase in the level of foreign financing of Canadian theatrical production ($55 million).

There was also a sharp rise in the percentage of Canadians using the Internet to watch video (e.g., television programs or video clips) in 2011. At the same time, the percentage of Canadians watching television over the Internet or using their cellphones to watch video also increased in 2011.

In the English-language market, the usage of the Internet for watching television programming was on par with the use of personal video recorders (PVRs) in Canada in 2011. While the share of Canadians watching video on their cellphones was above 8% in 2011, the share watching television programming on their cellphones was much lower: 3% in the French-language market and 4% in the English-language market. The use of tablet devices for watching television programming was also still quite low in 2011 at fewer than 3%.

Despite the fact that Netflix only launched its service in Canada in September 2010, by fall 2011, 10% of Canadians reported that they already held a subscription to the over-the-top video streaming service for films and television programming.

While convergent digital media production was not measured in the report the report found that there are “signs of vibrant industry activity.”

“For example, the games-development portion of the digital media production industry alone – which comprised some 348 companies – generated over $1.7 billion in economic activity and employed 15,700 Canadians in 2011.6 Convergent digital media production, as a segment of the wider digital media industry, yielded $34.6 million in production volume in 2011/12.”

Source: Cartt

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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