Oct 23, 2019
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Drop in foreign film production in B.C. made up for by increased domestic activity

The value of foreign feature film activity in B.C. fell by $105 million last year to $324 million but increasing domestic production caused total film and television production to rise by 2.3 per cent to $1.216 billion, according to BC Film Commission data released today.

Total domestic production in the province rose by 55 per cent to $324.2 million, offsetting a nine-per-cent decline in foreign production to $891.7 million.

Domestic and foreign television series production increased 22 per last year cent to $614 million.

While U.S. feature film production in B.C. slowed in 2012, more than 30 digital visual effects projects, worth $121 million, took place in the province.

Anxious B.C. industry officials want the province to boost tax breaks to attract more film and television production.

They feel Ontario and Quebec have clearly taken business away from B.C. by offering better tax credits. B.C. offers a 33-per-cent tax credit on labour costs only but Ontario and Quebec offer a 25-per-cent credit on all production costs.

The return of the B.C. provincial sales tax on April 1 means the industry will lose the roughly $20 million in annual tax refunds it received under the harmonized sales tax. It has been estimated the PST will add $100,000 to $200,000 to the cost of a $10-million production in B.C.

A recent Canadian Media Production Association report said B.C. lost 3,500 direct and spinoff film and television production jobs during the year ended March 31, 2012, with the total number falling from 39,500 to 36,000.

Ontario’s industry gained nearly 8,000 jobs during the same period – rising from 43,400 to 51,300, the report said.

Source: Vancouver Sun

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Front Page, Industry News

Drop in foreign film production in B.C. made up for by increased domestic activity

The value of foreign feature film activity in B.C. fell by $105 million last year to $324 million but increasing domestic production caused total film and television production to rise by 2.3 per cent to $1.216 billion, according to BC Film Commission data released today.

Total domestic production in the province rose by 55 per cent to $324.2 million, offsetting a nine-per-cent decline in foreign production to $891.7 million.

Domestic and foreign television series production increased 22 per last year cent to $614 million.

While U.S. feature film production in B.C. slowed in 2012, more than 30 digital visual effects projects, worth $121 million, took place in the province.

Anxious B.C. industry officials want the province to boost tax breaks to attract more film and television production.

They feel Ontario and Quebec have clearly taken business away from B.C. by offering better tax credits. B.C. offers a 33-per-cent tax credit on labour costs only but Ontario and Quebec offer a 25-per-cent credit on all production costs.

The return of the B.C. provincial sales tax on April 1 means the industry will lose the roughly $20 million in annual tax refunds it received under the harmonized sales tax. It has been estimated the PST will add $100,000 to $200,000 to the cost of a $10-million production in B.C.

A recent Canadian Media Production Association report said B.C. lost 3,500 direct and spinoff film and television production jobs during the year ended March 31, 2012, with the total number falling from 39,500 to 36,000.

Ontario’s industry gained nearly 8,000 jobs during the same period – rising from 43,400 to 51,300, the report said.

Source: Vancouver Sun

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Industry News

Drop in foreign film production in B.C. made up for by increased domestic activity

The value of foreign feature film activity in B.C. fell by $105 million last year to $324 million but increasing domestic production caused total film and television production to rise by 2.3 per cent to $1.216 billion, according to BC Film Commission data released today.

Total domestic production in the province rose by 55 per cent to $324.2 million, offsetting a nine-per-cent decline in foreign production to $891.7 million.

Domestic and foreign television series production increased 22 per last year cent to $614 million.

While U.S. feature film production in B.C. slowed in 2012, more than 30 digital visual effects projects, worth $121 million, took place in the province.

Anxious B.C. industry officials want the province to boost tax breaks to attract more film and television production.

They feel Ontario and Quebec have clearly taken business away from B.C. by offering better tax credits. B.C. offers a 33-per-cent tax credit on labour costs only but Ontario and Quebec offer a 25-per-cent credit on all production costs.

The return of the B.C. provincial sales tax on April 1 means the industry will lose the roughly $20 million in annual tax refunds it received under the harmonized sales tax. It has been estimated the PST will add $100,000 to $200,000 to the cost of a $10-million production in B.C.

A recent Canadian Media Production Association report said B.C. lost 3,500 direct and spinoff film and television production jobs during the year ended March 31, 2012, with the total number falling from 39,500 to 36,000.

Ontario’s industry gained nearly 8,000 jobs during the same period – rising from 43,400 to 51,300, the report said.

Source: Vancouver Sun

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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