Sep 22, 2019
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Q will go on, guest host says after Jian Ghomeshi fired by CBC

One day after Jian Ghomeshi, the popular host of the cultural affairs radio program Q, was dismissed by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. as allegations surfaced about his sexual behaviour, the show’s guest host said the program must go on and urged listeners to keep tuning in.

From Mr. Ghomeshi’s former chair, substitute host Brent Bambury began Monday’s program first with a large sigh, then with an address to those listening. Fans of the show flooded social media on Sunday with expressions of shock, disappointment and confusion at his firing.

“I know for the many of you who love and look forward to this show, this is a very hard day,” Mr. Bambury said.

He reminded his audience that while Q has lost its host, and its public face, there are “dozens of people” who work to produce the program and who are “still here,” and “still committed.”

“Today we’re doing what we do as producers, as broadcasters, and as people: We move forward. I hope you’ll come with us,” Mr. Bambury said, adding one of Mr. Ghomeshi’s trademark taglines: “This is Q.”

Within hours of losing his job on Sunday night, Mr. Ghomeshi turned to his personal Facebook page to issue a 1,586-word statement in which he claimed he was fired due to fears of a scandal if details of his “adventurous” sexual behaviour were revealed publicly.

Mr. Ghomeshi has hired Navigator, a prominent company that describes itself as a “high-stakes public strategy and communications firm,” and his lawyers announced Sunday that he intends to sue the CBC for $50-million.

In the statement, Mr. Ghomeshi claims he’s been hounded by false allegations from an ex-girlfriend. “I’ve done nothing wrong,” he said. Warning readers that what follows “may be shocking to some,” he details a relationship in which he engaged in dominance and submission, which he describes as “a mild form of Fifty Shades of Grey.”

His statement also raises the prospect of allegations of abuse, saying, “the implication may be made that this happens non-consensually. And that will be a lie.”

The Toronto Star reported late Sunday that three women have made allegations of violent, non-consensual assaults by Mr. Ghomeshi, while noting that none had reported their claims to police. The Star further reported that a former employee of the CBC claimed to have been sexually harassed by Mr. Ghomeshi.

The CBC, which did not provide details on the information that prompted its decision to part ways with the popular host, said the move “was not made without serious deliberation and careful consideration.”

In an e-mail, CBC spokesman Chuck Thompson said: “Information came to our attention recently, that in CBC’s judgment, precludes us from continuing our relationship with Jian Ghomeshi.”

The sudden departure of such a high-profile host from the CBC’s airwaves will be a major blow to the public broadcaster. At 47, Mr. Ghomeshi had broad appeal with a range of demographics, particularly hard-to-reach younger listeners, not only within Canada but outside the country as well. The fallout will affect impact Q, but perhaps also the future of the CBC more broadly at a trying time in the corporation’s history.

Q drew an average of 282,000 listeners in September and is now also distributed on 172 U.S. stations through Public Radio International, according to the CBC’s website. Those stations pay a licence fee to the CBC to carry the show.

The difficult questions raised by Mr. Ghomeshi’s dismissal surround not only the details of his conduct, but what CBC executives knew of it and when, and lines are being drawn in the battle to frame the public’s understanding of his departure.

Last Friday, the corporation announced Mr. Ghomeshi would take an indefinite leave to deal with “personal issues.” That same day, he tweeted that “I’m ok” and “taking some much needed personal time.”

The law firm Dentons Canada LLP is representing Mr. Ghomeshi. In a statement on Sunday, the firm said the lawsuit “will claim general and punitive damages for among other things, breach of confidence and bad faith in the amount of $50-million.” He also plans to file a grievance for reinstatement under the CBC’s collective agreement, according to his lawyers.

The CBC had not been served on Sunday, “however, if we are, as the public broadcaster, we will contest the lawsuit vigorously,” Mr. Thompson said.

Toronto Police spokeswoman Meaghan Gray told The Globe in an e-mail that “I have no information on any police involvement” with Mr. Ghomeshi.

Source: Globe and Mail

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Front Page, Industry News

Q will go on, guest host says after Jian Ghomeshi fired by CBC

One day after Jian Ghomeshi, the popular host of the cultural affairs radio program Q, was dismissed by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. as allegations surfaced about his sexual behaviour, the show’s guest host said the program must go on and urged listeners to keep tuning in.

From Mr. Ghomeshi’s former chair, substitute host Brent Bambury began Monday’s program first with a large sigh, then with an address to those listening. Fans of the show flooded social media on Sunday with expressions of shock, disappointment and confusion at his firing.

“I know for the many of you who love and look forward to this show, this is a very hard day,” Mr. Bambury said.

He reminded his audience that while Q has lost its host, and its public face, there are “dozens of people” who work to produce the program and who are “still here,” and “still committed.”

“Today we’re doing what we do as producers, as broadcasters, and as people: We move forward. I hope you’ll come with us,” Mr. Bambury said, adding one of Mr. Ghomeshi’s trademark taglines: “This is Q.”

Within hours of losing his job on Sunday night, Mr. Ghomeshi turned to his personal Facebook page to issue a 1,586-word statement in which he claimed he was fired due to fears of a scandal if details of his “adventurous” sexual behaviour were revealed publicly.

Mr. Ghomeshi has hired Navigator, a prominent company that describes itself as a “high-stakes public strategy and communications firm,” and his lawyers announced Sunday that he intends to sue the CBC for $50-million.

In the statement, Mr. Ghomeshi claims he’s been hounded by false allegations from an ex-girlfriend. “I’ve done nothing wrong,” he said. Warning readers that what follows “may be shocking to some,” he details a relationship in which he engaged in dominance and submission, which he describes as “a mild form of Fifty Shades of Grey.”

His statement also raises the prospect of allegations of abuse, saying, “the implication may be made that this happens non-consensually. And that will be a lie.”

The Toronto Star reported late Sunday that three women have made allegations of violent, non-consensual assaults by Mr. Ghomeshi, while noting that none had reported their claims to police. The Star further reported that a former employee of the CBC claimed to have been sexually harassed by Mr. Ghomeshi.

The CBC, which did not provide details on the information that prompted its decision to part ways with the popular host, said the move “was not made without serious deliberation and careful consideration.”

In an e-mail, CBC spokesman Chuck Thompson said: “Information came to our attention recently, that in CBC’s judgment, precludes us from continuing our relationship with Jian Ghomeshi.”

The sudden departure of such a high-profile host from the CBC’s airwaves will be a major blow to the public broadcaster. At 47, Mr. Ghomeshi had broad appeal with a range of demographics, particularly hard-to-reach younger listeners, not only within Canada but outside the country as well. The fallout will affect impact Q, but perhaps also the future of the CBC more broadly at a trying time in the corporation’s history.

Q drew an average of 282,000 listeners in September and is now also distributed on 172 U.S. stations through Public Radio International, according to the CBC’s website. Those stations pay a licence fee to the CBC to carry the show.

The difficult questions raised by Mr. Ghomeshi’s dismissal surround not only the details of his conduct, but what CBC executives knew of it and when, and lines are being drawn in the battle to frame the public’s understanding of his departure.

Last Friday, the corporation announced Mr. Ghomeshi would take an indefinite leave to deal with “personal issues.” That same day, he tweeted that “I’m ok” and “taking some much needed personal time.”

The law firm Dentons Canada LLP is representing Mr. Ghomeshi. In a statement on Sunday, the firm said the lawsuit “will claim general and punitive damages for among other things, breach of confidence and bad faith in the amount of $50-million.” He also plans to file a grievance for reinstatement under the CBC’s collective agreement, according to his lawyers.

The CBC had not been served on Sunday, “however, if we are, as the public broadcaster, we will contest the lawsuit vigorously,” Mr. Thompson said.

Toronto Police spokeswoman Meaghan Gray told The Globe in an e-mail that “I have no information on any police involvement” with Mr. Ghomeshi.

Source: Globe and Mail

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Front Page, Industry News

Q will go on, guest host says after Jian Ghomeshi fired by CBC

One day after Jian Ghomeshi, the popular host of the cultural affairs radio program Q, was dismissed by the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. as allegations surfaced about his sexual behaviour, the show’s guest host said the program must go on and urged listeners to keep tuning in.

From Mr. Ghomeshi’s former chair, substitute host Brent Bambury began Monday’s program first with a large sigh, then with an address to those listening. Fans of the show flooded social media on Sunday with expressions of shock, disappointment and confusion at his firing.

“I know for the many of you who love and look forward to this show, this is a very hard day,” Mr. Bambury said.

He reminded his audience that while Q has lost its host, and its public face, there are “dozens of people” who work to produce the program and who are “still here,” and “still committed.”

“Today we’re doing what we do as producers, as broadcasters, and as people: We move forward. I hope you’ll come with us,” Mr. Bambury said, adding one of Mr. Ghomeshi’s trademark taglines: “This is Q.”

Within hours of losing his job on Sunday night, Mr. Ghomeshi turned to his personal Facebook page to issue a 1,586-word statement in which he claimed he was fired due to fears of a scandal if details of his “adventurous” sexual behaviour were revealed publicly.

Mr. Ghomeshi has hired Navigator, a prominent company that describes itself as a “high-stakes public strategy and communications firm,” and his lawyers announced Sunday that he intends to sue the CBC for $50-million.

In the statement, Mr. Ghomeshi claims he’s been hounded by false allegations from an ex-girlfriend. “I’ve done nothing wrong,” he said. Warning readers that what follows “may be shocking to some,” he details a relationship in which he engaged in dominance and submission, which he describes as “a mild form of Fifty Shades of Grey.”

His statement also raises the prospect of allegations of abuse, saying, “the implication may be made that this happens non-consensually. And that will be a lie.”

The Toronto Star reported late Sunday that three women have made allegations of violent, non-consensual assaults by Mr. Ghomeshi, while noting that none had reported their claims to police. The Star further reported that a former employee of the CBC claimed to have been sexually harassed by Mr. Ghomeshi.

The CBC, which did not provide details on the information that prompted its decision to part ways with the popular host, said the move “was not made without serious deliberation and careful consideration.”

In an e-mail, CBC spokesman Chuck Thompson said: “Information came to our attention recently, that in CBC’s judgment, precludes us from continuing our relationship with Jian Ghomeshi.”

The sudden departure of such a high-profile host from the CBC’s airwaves will be a major blow to the public broadcaster. At 47, Mr. Ghomeshi had broad appeal with a range of demographics, particularly hard-to-reach younger listeners, not only within Canada but outside the country as well. The fallout will affect impact Q, but perhaps also the future of the CBC more broadly at a trying time in the corporation’s history.

Q drew an average of 282,000 listeners in September and is now also distributed on 172 U.S. stations through Public Radio International, according to the CBC’s website. Those stations pay a licence fee to the CBC to carry the show.

The difficult questions raised by Mr. Ghomeshi’s dismissal surround not only the details of his conduct, but what CBC executives knew of it and when, and lines are being drawn in the battle to frame the public’s understanding of his departure.

Last Friday, the corporation announced Mr. Ghomeshi would take an indefinite leave to deal with “personal issues.” That same day, he tweeted that “I’m ok” and “taking some much needed personal time.”

The law firm Dentons Canada LLP is representing Mr. Ghomeshi. In a statement on Sunday, the firm said the lawsuit “will claim general and punitive damages for among other things, breach of confidence and bad faith in the amount of $50-million.” He also plans to file a grievance for reinstatement under the CBC’s collective agreement, according to his lawyers.

The CBC had not been served on Sunday, “however, if we are, as the public broadcaster, we will contest the lawsuit vigorously,” Mr. Thompson said.

Toronto Police spokeswoman Meaghan Gray told The Globe in an e-mail that “I have no information on any police involvement” with Mr. Ghomeshi.

Source: Globe and Mail

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