May 27, 2019
Visit our sister site:

Headline, Industry News

Boyhood takes best picture from Toronto film critics with nods for Richard Linklater’s direction and Patricia Arquette as supporting actress

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood was the big winner as the Toronto Film Critics Association (TFCA) named its choices for the best films and performances of 2014. The movie was named best picture; Linklater took the directing prize; and Patricia Arquette was named best supporting actress.

Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel had also been in the running for best picture and best director. It picked up best screenplay for its script, written by Anderson and Hugo Guinness, and inspired by the writings of Stefan Zweig.

The Paul Thomas Anderson movie Inherent Vice, which opens in Canada on Christmas Day, had led the pack going into the voting, with five nominations for best picture, director, screenplay, supporting actor (Josh Brolin) and supporting actress (Katherine Waterston). It was shut out in all categories.

Toronto’s Boyhood awards match those of the New York Film Critics Circle and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. The film is also heavily represented at the Golden Globes (five nominations) and the Critics Choice Awards (eight nods), and is likely to be a serious Oscar contender for best picture.

In the other acting categories, Toronto critics picked Tom Hardy in Locke as the best actor; Marion Cotillard from The Immigrant as best actress; and J.K. Simmons from Whiplash as best supporting actor.

Rounding out the awards, the best first feature prize went to Ritesh Batra’s romantic drama The Lunchbox. The Tale of Princess Kaguya by Isao Takahata was named best animated feature. Force Majeure from Sweden’s Ruben Östlund took the best foreign-language feature prize. And best documentary went to The Overnighters by Jesse Moss. Albert Shin (In Her Place) is the winner of the Jay Scott prize for an emerging artist.

The awards will be handed out at the TFCA’s annual gala on Jan. 6. The evening’s event will also reveal the winner of the 2014 Rogers Best Canadian Film Award, worth $100,000. The three nominees for the prize are Enemy (Denis Villeneuve), The F Word (Michael Dowse) and Mommy (Xavier Dolan).

Source: National Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Headline, Industry News

Boyhood takes best picture from Toronto film critics with nods for Richard Linklater’s direction and Patricia Arquette as supporting actress

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood was the big winner as the Toronto Film Critics Association (TFCA) named its choices for the best films and performances of 2014. The movie was named best picture; Linklater took the directing prize; and Patricia Arquette was named best supporting actress.

Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel had also been in the running for best picture and best director. It picked up best screenplay for its script, written by Anderson and Hugo Guinness, and inspired by the writings of Stefan Zweig.

The Paul Thomas Anderson movie Inherent Vice, which opens in Canada on Christmas Day, had led the pack going into the voting, with five nominations for best picture, director, screenplay, supporting actor (Josh Brolin) and supporting actress (Katherine Waterston). It was shut out in all categories.

Toronto’s Boyhood awards match those of the New York Film Critics Circle and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. The film is also heavily represented at the Golden Globes (five nominations) and the Critics Choice Awards (eight nods), and is likely to be a serious Oscar contender for best picture.

In the other acting categories, Toronto critics picked Tom Hardy in Locke as the best actor; Marion Cotillard from The Immigrant as best actress; and J.K. Simmons from Whiplash as best supporting actor.

Rounding out the awards, the best first feature prize went to Ritesh Batra’s romantic drama The Lunchbox. The Tale of Princess Kaguya by Isao Takahata was named best animated feature. Force Majeure from Sweden’s Ruben Östlund took the best foreign-language feature prize. And best documentary went to The Overnighters by Jesse Moss. Albert Shin (In Her Place) is the winner of the Jay Scott prize for an emerging artist.

The awards will be handed out at the TFCA’s annual gala on Jan. 6. The evening’s event will also reveal the winner of the 2014 Rogers Best Canadian Film Award, worth $100,000. The three nominees for the prize are Enemy (Denis Villeneuve), The F Word (Michael Dowse) and Mommy (Xavier Dolan).

Source: National Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Headline, Industry News

Boyhood takes best picture from Toronto film critics with nods for Richard Linklater’s direction and Patricia Arquette as supporting actress

Richard Linklater’s Boyhood was the big winner as the Toronto Film Critics Association (TFCA) named its choices for the best films and performances of 2014. The movie was named best picture; Linklater took the directing prize; and Patricia Arquette was named best supporting actress.

Wes Anderson’s The Grand Budapest Hotel had also been in the running for best picture and best director. It picked up best screenplay for its script, written by Anderson and Hugo Guinness, and inspired by the writings of Stefan Zweig.

The Paul Thomas Anderson movie Inherent Vice, which opens in Canada on Christmas Day, had led the pack going into the voting, with five nominations for best picture, director, screenplay, supporting actor (Josh Brolin) and supporting actress (Katherine Waterston). It was shut out in all categories.

Toronto’s Boyhood awards match those of the New York Film Critics Circle and the Los Angeles Film Critics Association. The film is also heavily represented at the Golden Globes (five nominations) and the Critics Choice Awards (eight nods), and is likely to be a serious Oscar contender for best picture.

In the other acting categories, Toronto critics picked Tom Hardy in Locke as the best actor; Marion Cotillard from The Immigrant as best actress; and J.K. Simmons from Whiplash as best supporting actor.

Rounding out the awards, the best first feature prize went to Ritesh Batra’s romantic drama The Lunchbox. The Tale of Princess Kaguya by Isao Takahata was named best animated feature. Force Majeure from Sweden’s Ruben Östlund took the best foreign-language feature prize. And best documentary went to The Overnighters by Jesse Moss. Albert Shin (In Her Place) is the winner of the Jay Scott prize for an emerging artist.

The awards will be handed out at the TFCA’s annual gala on Jan. 6. The evening’s event will also reveal the winner of the 2014 Rogers Best Canadian Film Award, worth $100,000. The three nominees for the prize are Enemy (Denis Villeneuve), The F Word (Michael Dowse) and Mommy (Xavier Dolan).

Source: National Post

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Advertisements