Dec 02, 2020
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Youth in the spotlight of Canada’s Top 10 films

The majority of the Canadian movies picked for Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival feature a youthful perspective.

Guantanamo’s Child: Omar Khadr, by Patrick Reed and the Toronto Star’s Michelle Shephard; Patricia Rozema’s Into the Forest, starring Ellen Page and Evan Rachel Wood, and Andrew Cividino’s Sleeping Giant are among the seven films on the list that focus on young protagonists.

In the case of Alan Zweig’s HURT, about Steve Fonyo’s tumultuous life in the 30 years since his 1985 cancer fundraising run across Canada at age 19, the documentary forms a disturbing story of a tarnished legacy.

“The future is really bright for Canadian cinema,” said TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey. “For anyone who’s looking to see what’s going on right now in Canadian movies, I think I would look to young people.”

Bailey noted that Sleeping Giant and Closet Monster are both by first-time feature filmmakers.

“We always want a lot more young people to watch Canadian films,” Bailey added. “If this helps, then that’s great.”

The Top 10 features, shorts and student shorts for 2015 were chosen by panels of filmmakers and industry professionals and will screen at TIFF Bell Lightbox from Jan. 8 to 17. Filmmakers and guests provide introductions and do Q&A sessions with filmmakers. A selection of the movies then go on a cross-Canada tour.

“The shorts, I think, are certainly some of the best films we’ve got on our list this year and certainly some of the best films that have been made in this country this year,” said Bailey.

Rounding out the Top 10 feature list is Anne Émond’s Les êtres chers (Our Loved Ones), Guy Maddin and Evan Johnson’s The Forbidden Room and Philippe Falardeau’s My Internship in Canada.

The Lightbox will also host a feature conversation with Kiefer Sutherland on Jan. 16.
For a full list of Top 10 films and screening schedules, go to tiff.net.

Source: Toronto Star

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Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Youth in the spotlight of Canada’s Top 10 films

The majority of the Canadian movies picked for Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival feature a youthful perspective.

Guantanamo’s Child: Omar Khadr, by Patrick Reed and the Toronto Star’s Michelle Shephard; Patricia Rozema’s Into the Forest, starring Ellen Page and Evan Rachel Wood, and Andrew Cividino’s Sleeping Giant are among the seven films on the list that focus on young protagonists.

In the case of Alan Zweig’s HURT, about Steve Fonyo’s tumultuous life in the 30 years since his 1985 cancer fundraising run across Canada at age 19, the documentary forms a disturbing story of a tarnished legacy.

“The future is really bright for Canadian cinema,” said TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey. “For anyone who’s looking to see what’s going on right now in Canadian movies, I think I would look to young people.”

Bailey noted that Sleeping Giant and Closet Monster are both by first-time feature filmmakers.

“We always want a lot more young people to watch Canadian films,” Bailey added. “If this helps, then that’s great.”

The Top 10 features, shorts and student shorts for 2015 were chosen by panels of filmmakers and industry professionals and will screen at TIFF Bell Lightbox from Jan. 8 to 17. Filmmakers and guests provide introductions and do Q&A sessions with filmmakers. A selection of the movies then go on a cross-Canada tour.

“The shorts, I think, are certainly some of the best films we’ve got on our list this year and certainly some of the best films that have been made in this country this year,” said Bailey.

Rounding out the Top 10 feature list is Anne Émond’s Les êtres chers (Our Loved Ones), Guy Maddin and Evan Johnson’s The Forbidden Room and Philippe Falardeau’s My Internship in Canada.

The Lightbox will also host a feature conversation with Kiefer Sutherland on Jan. 16.
For a full list of Top 10 films and screening schedules, go to tiff.net.

Source: Toronto Star

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Youth in the spotlight of Canada’s Top 10 films

The majority of the Canadian movies picked for Canada’s Top Ten Film Festival feature a youthful perspective.

Guantanamo’s Child: Omar Khadr, by Patrick Reed and the Toronto Star’s Michelle Shephard; Patricia Rozema’s Into the Forest, starring Ellen Page and Evan Rachel Wood, and Andrew Cividino’s Sleeping Giant are among the seven films on the list that focus on young protagonists.

In the case of Alan Zweig’s HURT, about Steve Fonyo’s tumultuous life in the 30 years since his 1985 cancer fundraising run across Canada at age 19, the documentary forms a disturbing story of a tarnished legacy.

“The future is really bright for Canadian cinema,” said TIFF artistic director Cameron Bailey. “For anyone who’s looking to see what’s going on right now in Canadian movies, I think I would look to young people.”

Bailey noted that Sleeping Giant and Closet Monster are both by first-time feature filmmakers.

“We always want a lot more young people to watch Canadian films,” Bailey added. “If this helps, then that’s great.”

The Top 10 features, shorts and student shorts for 2015 were chosen by panels of filmmakers and industry professionals and will screen at TIFF Bell Lightbox from Jan. 8 to 17. Filmmakers and guests provide introductions and do Q&A sessions with filmmakers. A selection of the movies then go on a cross-Canada tour.

“The shorts, I think, are certainly some of the best films we’ve got on our list this year and certainly some of the best films that have been made in this country this year,” said Bailey.

Rounding out the Top 10 feature list is Anne Émond’s Les êtres chers (Our Loved Ones), Guy Maddin and Evan Johnson’s The Forbidden Room and Philippe Falardeau’s My Internship in Canada.

The Lightbox will also host a feature conversation with Kiefer Sutherland on Jan. 16.
For a full list of Top 10 films and screening schedules, go to tiff.net.

Source: Toronto Star

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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