Dec 04, 2020
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Talented filmmakers leaving P.E.I. without film labour rebate, says IMAC

The head of the Island Media Arts Cooperative is frustrated the province hasn’t re-established a labour rebate for film and TV production.

Nils Ling told CBC News millions of dollars in federal funding is being lost and talented Island filmmakers are moving to work elsewhere. The P.E.I. government cut its film support program more than a decade ago.

Ling said proposal was submitted almost two years ago asking for a 25 per cent labour rebate. With economic spins offs and tax generation, he said, the rebate wouldn’t cost taxpayers a cent.

“There’s no reason for a delay. This isn’t going to cost anybody any money, and the benefits in terms of retaining youth, and the benefits in terms of training, the benefits in terms of high tech jobs, all those things are there, with no cost to the taxpayer,” said Ling.

“How is this not something you jump all over? We’re losing really, really talented people. There’s no excuse for it. It’s a drain that we can’t afford.”

In an emailed statement, the Department of Economic Development said it’s provided $2.4 million in funding for filmmakers over the last eight years on a case-by-case basis.

The department says it is aiming to produce a sustainable industry, less reliant on producers who shop around for the best tax credits available.

Officials say what role government should play in terms of funding for the film industry will be explored in the development of a Culture Strategy. Work on that is planned to start soon.

Source: CBC

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Front Page, Industry News

Talented filmmakers leaving P.E.I. without film labour rebate, says IMAC

The head of the Island Media Arts Cooperative is frustrated the province hasn’t re-established a labour rebate for film and TV production.

Nils Ling told CBC News millions of dollars in federal funding is being lost and talented Island filmmakers are moving to work elsewhere. The P.E.I. government cut its film support program more than a decade ago.

Ling said proposal was submitted almost two years ago asking for a 25 per cent labour rebate. With economic spins offs and tax generation, he said, the rebate wouldn’t cost taxpayers a cent.

“There’s no reason for a delay. This isn’t going to cost anybody any money, and the benefits in terms of retaining youth, and the benefits in terms of training, the benefits in terms of high tech jobs, all those things are there, with no cost to the taxpayer,” said Ling.

“How is this not something you jump all over? We’re losing really, really talented people. There’s no excuse for it. It’s a drain that we can’t afford.”

In an emailed statement, the Department of Economic Development said it’s provided $2.4 million in funding for filmmakers over the last eight years on a case-by-case basis.

The department says it is aiming to produce a sustainable industry, less reliant on producers who shop around for the best tax credits available.

Officials say what role government should play in terms of funding for the film industry will be explored in the development of a Culture Strategy. Work on that is planned to start soon.

Source: CBC

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Industry News

Talented filmmakers leaving P.E.I. without film labour rebate, says IMAC

The head of the Island Media Arts Cooperative is frustrated the province hasn’t re-established a labour rebate for film and TV production.

Nils Ling told CBC News millions of dollars in federal funding is being lost and talented Island filmmakers are moving to work elsewhere. The P.E.I. government cut its film support program more than a decade ago.

Ling said proposal was submitted almost two years ago asking for a 25 per cent labour rebate. With economic spins offs and tax generation, he said, the rebate wouldn’t cost taxpayers a cent.

“There’s no reason for a delay. This isn’t going to cost anybody any money, and the benefits in terms of retaining youth, and the benefits in terms of training, the benefits in terms of high tech jobs, all those things are there, with no cost to the taxpayer,” said Ling.

“How is this not something you jump all over? We’re losing really, really talented people. There’s no excuse for it. It’s a drain that we can’t afford.”

In an emailed statement, the Department of Economic Development said it’s provided $2.4 million in funding for filmmakers over the last eight years on a case-by-case basis.

The department says it is aiming to produce a sustainable industry, less reliant on producers who shop around for the best tax credits available.

Officials say what role government should play in terms of funding for the film industry will be explored in the development of a Culture Strategy. Work on that is planned to start soon.

Source: CBC

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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