Dec 01, 2020
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Rob Stewart’s sister says film community will rally to finish second shark doc

The sister of the late Toronto-based filmmaker Rob Stewart says she has received tremendous support from the Canadian film community since her brother’s passing, and the family intends to honour his memory by continuing his work to raise awareness of ocean conservation on the silver screen.

Stewart had been in Florida shooting a follow-up to his 2006 documentary “Sharkwater,” called “Sharkwater: Extinction,” when he disappeared while scuba diving with friends on Jan. 31. His body was recovered by the U.S. Coast Guard three days later. He was 37 years old.

“My family and I are committed to carrying Rob’s work forward. We will certainly do everything in our power to make sure that film continues in the spirit Rob was aiming for,” Alexandra Stewart told CTV News Channel ahead of a funeral service on Saturday.

Friends and family filled the pews at the Bloor Street United Church in downtown Toronto. Local politicians, including Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, also attended. During the funeral, Alexandra shared a list of 37 things she loved about her brother with those at the service.

Stewart was remembered for his positive outlook on life, a quality he is said to have shared with those around him. His friend Morgan Chapman said many attending the funeral wore blue in Stewart’s honour.

“He was a loveable guy, a great spirit and just always happy. I actually don’t ever recall Rob being unhappy,” said Chapman. “Not only was he saving our oceans and so passionate about sharks, he was a really great friend.”

“I’ve known Rob for 15 years, and what I told his parents is that he was a gift of light, of energy and of calm,” said Elaine Dembe. “He had a beautiful presence and that indicated he was a spiritual person. He didn’t need much to be happy.”

During the funeral, another friend read a letter that Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki had sent to the filmmaker’s family.

“If it provides any solace, please be assured that Rob had a huge effect in his life,” Stuart Townsend read. “Not only educating large numbers of people and saving countless lives of sharks, he has inspired a whole generation of young people, many of whom will go on and amplify Rob’s work.”

Professionally, Stewart was known for getting up close and personal with sharks of numerous species, at times free diving next to them with no oxygen tank. He was equally willing to risk his personal safety in order to expose the shark killing industry fueled by global demand for products such as fins for soup and parts for wellness remedies.

“He found them beautiful,” Alexandra told CTV Toronto. “I think he thought that he was such an incredible diver that he could get close to them and then, therefore, show the world they’ve been misrepresented.”

Alexandra said her brother’s work touched countless people throughout his award-winning career.

“We know that Rob’s work was really far from being over. There is still so much more work to done,” said Alexandra.

“We have had tremendous support from all his partners, including those in the Canadian film community and the international film community, in coming forward to say they will help out in finishing this work, which we are tremendously grateful for.”
“Sharkwater” won more than 40 international awards, and was named one of the top ten Canadian films of 2006 by the Toronto International Film Festival. A Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign for “Sharkwater: Extinction” raised more than $200,000, surpassing its goal of $150,000.

“There is still so much more work to be done in terms of saving the oceans and saving our planet,” said Alexandra. “Everyone out there who was touched by Rob is really at the heart of his legacy.”

Source: CTV

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Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Rob Stewart’s sister says film community will rally to finish second shark doc

The sister of the late Toronto-based filmmaker Rob Stewart says she has received tremendous support from the Canadian film community since her brother’s passing, and the family intends to honour his memory by continuing his work to raise awareness of ocean conservation on the silver screen.

Stewart had been in Florida shooting a follow-up to his 2006 documentary “Sharkwater,” called “Sharkwater: Extinction,” when he disappeared while scuba diving with friends on Jan. 31. His body was recovered by the U.S. Coast Guard three days later. He was 37 years old.

“My family and I are committed to carrying Rob’s work forward. We will certainly do everything in our power to make sure that film continues in the spirit Rob was aiming for,” Alexandra Stewart told CTV News Channel ahead of a funeral service on Saturday.

Friends and family filled the pews at the Bloor Street United Church in downtown Toronto. Local politicians, including Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, also attended. During the funeral, Alexandra shared a list of 37 things she loved about her brother with those at the service.

Stewart was remembered for his positive outlook on life, a quality he is said to have shared with those around him. His friend Morgan Chapman said many attending the funeral wore blue in Stewart’s honour.

“He was a loveable guy, a great spirit and just always happy. I actually don’t ever recall Rob being unhappy,” said Chapman. “Not only was he saving our oceans and so passionate about sharks, he was a really great friend.”

“I’ve known Rob for 15 years, and what I told his parents is that he was a gift of light, of energy and of calm,” said Elaine Dembe. “He had a beautiful presence and that indicated he was a spiritual person. He didn’t need much to be happy.”

During the funeral, another friend read a letter that Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki had sent to the filmmaker’s family.

“If it provides any solace, please be assured that Rob had a huge effect in his life,” Stuart Townsend read. “Not only educating large numbers of people and saving countless lives of sharks, he has inspired a whole generation of young people, many of whom will go on and amplify Rob’s work.”

Professionally, Stewart was known for getting up close and personal with sharks of numerous species, at times free diving next to them with no oxygen tank. He was equally willing to risk his personal safety in order to expose the shark killing industry fueled by global demand for products such as fins for soup and parts for wellness remedies.

“He found them beautiful,” Alexandra told CTV Toronto. “I think he thought that he was such an incredible diver that he could get close to them and then, therefore, show the world they’ve been misrepresented.”

Alexandra said her brother’s work touched countless people throughout his award-winning career.

“We know that Rob’s work was really far from being over. There is still so much more work to done,” said Alexandra.

“We have had tremendous support from all his partners, including those in the Canadian film community and the international film community, in coming forward to say they will help out in finishing this work, which we are tremendously grateful for.”
“Sharkwater” won more than 40 international awards, and was named one of the top ten Canadian films of 2006 by the Toronto International Film Festival. A Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign for “Sharkwater: Extinction” raised more than $200,000, surpassing its goal of $150,000.

“There is still so much more work to be done in terms of saving the oceans and saving our planet,” said Alexandra. “Everyone out there who was touched by Rob is really at the heart of his legacy.”

Source: CTV

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Front Page, Headline, Industry News

Rob Stewart’s sister says film community will rally to finish second shark doc

The sister of the late Toronto-based filmmaker Rob Stewart says she has received tremendous support from the Canadian film community since her brother’s passing, and the family intends to honour his memory by continuing his work to raise awareness of ocean conservation on the silver screen.

Stewart had been in Florida shooting a follow-up to his 2006 documentary “Sharkwater,” called “Sharkwater: Extinction,” when he disappeared while scuba diving with friends on Jan. 31. His body was recovered by the U.S. Coast Guard three days later. He was 37 years old.

“My family and I are committed to carrying Rob’s work forward. We will certainly do everything in our power to make sure that film continues in the spirit Rob was aiming for,” Alexandra Stewart told CTV News Channel ahead of a funeral service on Saturday.

Friends and family filled the pews at the Bloor Street United Church in downtown Toronto. Local politicians, including Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, also attended. During the funeral, Alexandra shared a list of 37 things she loved about her brother with those at the service.

Stewart was remembered for his positive outlook on life, a quality he is said to have shared with those around him. His friend Morgan Chapman said many attending the funeral wore blue in Stewart’s honour.

“He was a loveable guy, a great spirit and just always happy. I actually don’t ever recall Rob being unhappy,” said Chapman. “Not only was he saving our oceans and so passionate about sharks, he was a really great friend.”

“I’ve known Rob for 15 years, and what I told his parents is that he was a gift of light, of energy and of calm,” said Elaine Dembe. “He had a beautiful presence and that indicated he was a spiritual person. He didn’t need much to be happy.”

During the funeral, another friend read a letter that Canadian environmentalist David Suzuki had sent to the filmmaker’s family.

“If it provides any solace, please be assured that Rob had a huge effect in his life,” Stuart Townsend read. “Not only educating large numbers of people and saving countless lives of sharks, he has inspired a whole generation of young people, many of whom will go on and amplify Rob’s work.”

Professionally, Stewart was known for getting up close and personal with sharks of numerous species, at times free diving next to them with no oxygen tank. He was equally willing to risk his personal safety in order to expose the shark killing industry fueled by global demand for products such as fins for soup and parts for wellness remedies.

“He found them beautiful,” Alexandra told CTV Toronto. “I think he thought that he was such an incredible diver that he could get close to them and then, therefore, show the world they’ve been misrepresented.”

Alexandra said her brother’s work touched countless people throughout his award-winning career.

“We know that Rob’s work was really far from being over. There is still so much more work to done,” said Alexandra.

“We have had tremendous support from all his partners, including those in the Canadian film community and the international film community, in coming forward to say they will help out in finishing this work, which we are tremendously grateful for.”
“Sharkwater” won more than 40 international awards, and was named one of the top ten Canadian films of 2006 by the Toronto International Film Festival. A Kickstarter crowd-funding campaign for “Sharkwater: Extinction” raised more than $200,000, surpassing its goal of $150,000.

“There is still so much more work to be done in terms of saving the oceans and saving our planet,” said Alexandra. “Everyone out there who was touched by Rob is really at the heart of his legacy.”

Source: CTV

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Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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