Oct 24, 2017
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Joe Sutherland (owner-operator Joe Sutherland Rentals) provides his thoughts on the future of HDR

Hardly a day goes by when someone doesn’t ask me where is our industry going? Is it 4K, 8K, HDR or some combination?

Answering this question is made difficult by the plethora of near-misinformation that buries the most likely answer in constant self interest.

Let me give you my answer: In the near future, I believe broadcast will be “4K HDR” and theatrical “8K HDR” but not the HDR being pushed today! The technology already exists to produce images that are subjectively the same as looking through a window or door and even beyond that. 

We have become so accustomed to bland, flat, non-dimensional images that we have all but ceased to imagine what a truly realistic image should be. Look at any TV set or monitor and ask yourself is this the same image I see when looking through that door or window? If it is, then you have reached the peak of your vision and there is no need for you to read further.

Some experts have said, “the human eye can only see roughly 15 stops of latitude and modern cameras give us that, we just need to preserve it throughout the process”. Well those experts have very limited imaginations and I think they are completely wrong! It’s not what the human eye sees it’s what the “mind” thinks it sees.

When a person looks at a scene they scan the dark areas and the light areas creating a mental image of what they are looking at and not a technical image. We mentally see as many stops as are needed to form our mental image. True HDR can, should, must do the same.

“Experts” have also said, “HDR can be or is (too) surreal”. Oddly I think that is the whole point. When sound came to moving pictures we created soundscapes, when colour came we used it to portray mood etc.. All of which is to enhance the narrative experience.

Talking movies and colour film were an evolution and didn’t happen overnight. True HDR will also be an evolution likely taking years mainly because the developers and manufacturers need gradual development in order to maximize profits.

True HDR should be compared to the “Turing Test”, when we cannot tell the difference between a monitor or a window, only then we will have the ability to create and exhibit images equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, those seen by the human imagination. 

The first steps in True HDR have already happened and HDR will be and will soon become, an indispensable tool for every filmmakers pallet.

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Front Page, Headline, Industry News, Technology News

Joe Sutherland (owner-operator Joe Sutherland Rentals) provides his thoughts on the future of HDR

Hardly a day goes by when someone doesn’t ask me where is our industry going? Is it 4K, 8K, HDR or some combination?

Answering this question is made difficult by the plethora of near-misinformation that buries the most likely answer in constant self interest.

Let me give you my answer: In the near future, I believe broadcast will be “4K HDR” and theatrical “8K HDR” but not the HDR being pushed today! The technology already exists to produce images that are subjectively the same as looking through a window or door and even beyond that. 

We have become so accustomed to bland, flat, non-dimensional images that we have all but ceased to imagine what a truly realistic image should be. Look at any TV set or monitor and ask yourself is this the same image I see when looking through that door or window? If it is, then you have reached the peak of your vision and there is no need for you to read further.

Some experts have said, “the human eye can only see roughly 15 stops of latitude and modern cameras give us that, we just need to preserve it throughout the process”. Well those experts have very limited imaginations and I think they are completely wrong! It’s not what the human eye sees it’s what the “mind” thinks it sees.

When a person looks at a scene they scan the dark areas and the light areas creating a mental image of what they are looking at and not a technical image. We mentally see as many stops as are needed to form our mental image. True HDR can, should, must do the same.

“Experts” have also said, “HDR can be or is (too) surreal”. Oddly I think that is the whole point. When sound came to moving pictures we created soundscapes, when colour came we used it to portray mood etc.. All of which is to enhance the narrative experience.

Talking movies and colour film were an evolution and didn’t happen overnight. True HDR will also be an evolution likely taking years mainly because the developers and manufacturers need gradual development in order to maximize profits.

True HDR should be compared to the “Turing Test”, when we cannot tell the difference between a monitor or a window, only then we will have the ability to create and exhibit images equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, those seen by the human imagination. 

The first steps in True HDR have already happened and HDR will be and will soon become, an indispensable tool for every filmmakers pallet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Front Page, Headline, Industry News, Technology News

Joe Sutherland (owner-operator Joe Sutherland Rentals) provides his thoughts on the future of HDR

Hardly a day goes by when someone doesn’t ask me where is our industry going? Is it 4K, 8K, HDR or some combination?

Answering this question is made difficult by the plethora of near-misinformation that buries the most likely answer in constant self interest.

Let me give you my answer: In the near future, I believe broadcast will be “4K HDR” and theatrical “8K HDR” but not the HDR being pushed today! The technology already exists to produce images that are subjectively the same as looking through a window or door and even beyond that. 

We have become so accustomed to bland, flat, non-dimensional images that we have all but ceased to imagine what a truly realistic image should be. Look at any TV set or monitor and ask yourself is this the same image I see when looking through that door or window? If it is, then you have reached the peak of your vision and there is no need for you to read further.

Some experts have said, “the human eye can only see roughly 15 stops of latitude and modern cameras give us that, we just need to preserve it throughout the process”. Well those experts have very limited imaginations and I think they are completely wrong! It’s not what the human eye sees it’s what the “mind” thinks it sees.

When a person looks at a scene they scan the dark areas and the light areas creating a mental image of what they are looking at and not a technical image. We mentally see as many stops as are needed to form our mental image. True HDR can, should, must do the same.

“Experts” have also said, “HDR can be or is (too) surreal”. Oddly I think that is the whole point. When sound came to moving pictures we created soundscapes, when colour came we used it to portray mood etc.. All of which is to enhance the narrative experience.

Talking movies and colour film were an evolution and didn’t happen overnight. True HDR will also be an evolution likely taking years mainly because the developers and manufacturers need gradual development in order to maximize profits.

True HDR should be compared to the “Turing Test”, when we cannot tell the difference between a monitor or a window, only then we will have the ability to create and exhibit images equivalent to, or indistinguishable from, those seen by the human imagination. 

The first steps in True HDR have already happened and HDR will be and will soon become, an indispensable tool for every filmmakers pallet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

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