Dec 04, 2020
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Movies

Bon Cop Bad Cop

Bon Cop Bad Cop does just what a good movie should do _ it leaves the viewer wanting more. It’s fast-paced, it’s funny, there’s real chemistry between the stars and it makes Quebec and Ontario just plain look good on film.

It’s the story of two cops _ one uptight, by-the-book Ontario detective (Colm Feore) and one rock’n’roll, ignore-the-book Quebec investigator (Patrick Huard) who get partnered to solve the murder of a hockey executive whose body is found draped across the welcome sign at the Ontario-Quebec border. OK, some have said the idea of hockey motivated murders is hokey but, hey, this is Canada, eh? And it works, in a loopy way. Huard and Feore are backed up by a first-rate supporting cast _ Lucie Laurier as Huard’s smouldering wife, Rick Mercer as a Don Cherryesque hockey commentator and two standouts _ Louis-Jose Houde as a trivia-obsessed pathologist and Pierre Lebeau as Huard’s suffering boss.

Bon Cop Bad Cop has the added twist of having dialogue pretty much in equal parts English and French, with subtitles. It’s not hard to follow despite the rapid-fire delivery and it gives a really good look at how Canada’s two main cultures co-exist in the 21st century. The film, which was made in Quebec where it continues to be a hot ticket, doesn’t set out to solve any national unity questions. But it may have provided an answer to what Canadian movie goers have been looking for in their homegrown cinema.

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Movies

Bon Cop Bad Cop

Bon Cop Bad Cop does just what a good movie should do _ it leaves the viewer wanting more. It’s fast-paced, it’s funny, there’s real chemistry between the stars and it makes Quebec and Ontario just plain look good on film.

It’s the story of two cops _ one uptight, by-the-book Ontario detective (Colm Feore) and one rock’n’roll, ignore-the-book Quebec investigator (Patrick Huard) who get partnered to solve the murder of a hockey executive whose body is found draped across the welcome sign at the Ontario-Quebec border. OK, some have said the idea of hockey motivated murders is hokey but, hey, this is Canada, eh? And it works, in a loopy way. Huard and Feore are backed up by a first-rate supporting cast _ Lucie Laurier as Huard’s smouldering wife, Rick Mercer as a Don Cherryesque hockey commentator and two standouts _ Louis-Jose Houde as a trivia-obsessed pathologist and Pierre Lebeau as Huard’s suffering boss.

Bon Cop Bad Cop has the added twist of having dialogue pretty much in equal parts English and French, with subtitles. It’s not hard to follow despite the rapid-fire delivery and it gives a really good look at how Canada’s two main cultures co-exist in the 21st century. The film, which was made in Quebec where it continues to be a hot ticket, doesn’t set out to solve any national unity questions. But it may have provided an answer to what Canadian movie goers have been looking for in their homegrown cinema.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Movies

Bon Cop Bad Cop

Bon Cop Bad Cop does just what a good movie should do _ it leaves the viewer wanting more. It’s fast-paced, it’s funny, there’s real chemistry between the stars and it makes Quebec and Ontario just plain look good on film.

It’s the story of two cops _ one uptight, by-the-book Ontario detective (Colm Feore) and one rock’n’roll, ignore-the-book Quebec investigator (Patrick Huard) who get partnered to solve the murder of a hockey executive whose body is found draped across the welcome sign at the Ontario-Quebec border. OK, some have said the idea of hockey motivated murders is hokey but, hey, this is Canada, eh? And it works, in a loopy way. Huard and Feore are backed up by a first-rate supporting cast _ Lucie Laurier as Huard’s smouldering wife, Rick Mercer as a Don Cherryesque hockey commentator and two standouts _ Louis-Jose Houde as a trivia-obsessed pathologist and Pierre Lebeau as Huard’s suffering boss.

Bon Cop Bad Cop has the added twist of having dialogue pretty much in equal parts English and French, with subtitles. It’s not hard to follow despite the rapid-fire delivery and it gives a really good look at how Canada’s two main cultures co-exist in the 21st century. The film, which was made in Quebec where it continues to be a hot ticket, doesn’t set out to solve any national unity questions. But it may have provided an answer to what Canadian movie goers have been looking for in their homegrown cinema.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

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